#1
How do i get a fat/big sound out of my guitar on recordings? I read something about like 4 overdubs one paned left one right, something like that can't remember! But if anyone could give me some good techniques it would be greatly appreciated
#3
Should I change the tone of the guitar too? on each double tracking or leave the same
#5
So put like 2 more tracks up the center with slightly different tone and im set? tysm
#7
you can also experiment with chord inversions and stuff. i just recorded a song and the chorus is mainly power chords but i added some more guitar tracks with open chords and it opened up the guitars a lot more. it works great. at one point i think i have like guitar 16 tracks going at one time.
#8
the big sound partially comes from having the guitars out of the way. doesnt make sense at first, but it does as you try it out. panning two takes with the same tone 100% to each side can actually sound kinda thin as just guitars. but once you add in bass and drums and whatever else, it starts to thicken up. things arent competing as much for space, and they have room to breathe. as you fill up the whole space and everything has a distinct sound, it actually sounds thicker.

if you want the guitar tracks themselves to sound thicker (and not the overall song), thats when i suggest layering guitars. inversions, octaves, doubling some notes, and stuff like that. or even recording the part multiple times with widely different tones. but the same idea applies, make sure everything has somewhere to sit so things dont clash too much.
#9
just do two tracks to the sides like Ethan said.
pan them 90-100ish to the left and right.

if you want an even more big sound then record two more and pan them around 60-75ish to each side.

just make sure your playing is real tight.
#10
Despite what the guy a few posts up said,definantly change the tones on each tracking.
Whilst there's nothing wrong with double tracking the same sound,doing a second track with a different sound turns out great.Works best when the tones complement each other,compensating for the others weak points.
I.E: An SG through a big muff panned to the left,then a strat into a marshall panned to the right can get a great sound.
Seagulls,the chicken of the ocean.

Originally posted by Gunpowder:
Everyone just jumps on the bandwagon and gives the same advice in these situations. You know what? I'm going to be different. Call the firemen.
#11
^ I disagree. Having too much of a different tone, or compensating for weak points (a bright tone on one side, a dark tone on the other) causes it to sound off balance it ruins it, especially when listening through headphones.

Maybe two slightly different mic positions or something. That might mix well.
#12
I like to have pretty similar tones cause two way different sounds sound ****ed.

Personally I pan each 80% (depending on what is being played). If its straight just an exact layer I usually do like 90 some but I like having slight differences.
#13
Quote by Ian hawkins
Despite what the guy a few posts up said,definantly change the tones on each tracking.
It's about personal preference. There's no right or wrong, but most people like to use the same tone when you double-track because you generally want it to sound like one huge guitar sound all around you. Changing the tones makes them too different and too distinguishable.
#14
Quote by Ignite
^ I disagree. Having too much of a different tone, or compensating for weak points (a bright tone on one side, a dark tone on the other) causes it to sound off balance it ruins it, especially when listening through headphones.

Maybe two slightly different mic positions or something. That might mix well.


Think he meant more like quad tracking, like recording bright guitars for the two far outside tracks, and then record dark guitars for the two inside tracks, which I've done this before, and it worked pretty good, but it kinda causes too much sonic information and the mix starts to become cluttered and muddy.

So I just keep 4 tracks of similar sound, pan them 100% right full volume, 80% right 30% less volume, 80% left 30% less volume, 100% left full volume.

Works for me when I quad track.
Last edited by ethan_hanus at Mar 22, 2011,
#15
There's some good advice in this thread, so I'm not going to say anyone is "wrong". However, here's what I do (generally): record the EXACT same guitar track twice, and pan them hard right and left. (80-100) Then, let's say you have your big hook coming in, track 2 more with a bit darker tone, and pan them to about 75 on each side. This gives you a fuller sound while allowing the vocals and/or lead guitar to occupy the higher frequencies and shine through the middle. Just something you might try