#1
Using a lick from Paul Gilbert's video lesson to practice my speed and cordnation。
My max tempo that I am able to play evenly and within the beat is now at 100 bpm; in 1/8th notes (I hope my math is correct....)。

I am trying to increase the tempo in small amount now;can anyone with experience similar to me or from the past give me some advices? What should be my lifetime target BPM?

My first forum post and it won't be the last!!!
#2
1/8th notes would be 2 notes on every beat on your metronome - just to verify your maths

Don't try to go for a target bpm. That's just a number.
Other than that, if it's speed you are going for, just make sure you are playing every note evenly and controlled. Doing so will make sure it will sound great once you build up more speed as well.
Also, don't worry once progress comes a lot slower than it did at first...the faster you get, the harder it is to push further - but you'll get there if you stick with it!

Lastly..another tip to make exercises more interesting. Try playing around with dynamics - i.e. mix up hard and soft (loud/quiet) playing. Like play a couple of bars soft, and then a couple hard.
Palm muting is also not bad to throw in there to mix things up.

Lastly (again!) - I can't remember..but I think Paul Gilbert actually did this (maybe still does..or maybe I am mixing him up with someone else now):
Try to play each lick starting with both a downstroke and an upstroke.

Phew...this should keep you entertained a while I hope
Just remember..these are just ideas of things you can do...you can just ignore it all...or take some of them. Just have fun and keep it up!
#3
I would add that practice it with both hands separately and when they are both separately about 120-150% the target speed with a good technique slow down and start raising the speed with a metronome. If you make a mistake play through it, but if it comes again slow down. Stuttering isn't as big of a problem on guitar as on piano, but I would still reinforce the habit of playing through mistakes.

I prefer to practice hands separately, because it leaves less of a chance for bad habits, but I guess most people don't bother so it should be okay to not do it.
#4
Quote by Unrelaxed
I would add that practice it with both hands separately and when they are both separately about 120-150% the target speed with a good technique slow down and start raising the speed with a metronome. If you make a mistake play through it, but if it comes again slow down. Stuttering isn't as big of a problem on guitar as on piano, but I would still reinforce the habit of playing through mistakes.

I prefer to practice hands separately, because it leaves less of a chance for bad habits, but I guess most people don't bother so it should be okay to not do it.


not only that watching yourself helps you develop your muscle memory.
#5
Quote by Unrelaxed

I prefer to practice hands separately, because it leaves less of a chance for bad habits, but I guess most people don't bother so it should be okay to not do it.


Practice hands separately?

By that, did u mean left hand alt picking only without left hand on notes?
and left hand on notes without right hand picking?

Thanks for sharing this method, really appreciate it!!
#6
Quote by Shor
1/8th notes would be 2 notes on every beat on your metronome - just to verify your maths


My bad music theory grade goes for that;i am able to play 16th note (4 notes every beat in 100bpm) and on target。


Quote by Shor

Try to play each lick starting with both a downstroke and an upstroke.

That's a smart way to practice!! Thanks for telling me。


Quote by shor
Phew...this should keep you entertained a while I hope
Just remember..these are just ideas of things you can do...you can just ignore it all...or take some of them. Just have fun and keep it up!


Yes! IT's fun!! Otherwise I wouldn't do it!!
Last edited by pilotinsky at Mar 22, 2011,
#7
Quote by pilotinsky
Practice hands separately?

By that, did u mean left hand alt picking only without left hand on notes?
and left hand on notes without right hand picking?

Thanks for sharing this method, really appreciate it!!


Yeah, just picking or fretting, left hand is difficult though since you don't hear the strings enough, so before practicing left hand play the part and try to remember how it should look with your left hand. Be very aware of your muting with the left hand when it's necessary. And check with both hands occasionally.
Right hand is pretty easy after getting it down for the first time.