#1
Hey,

So this is my first thread and I have a question:
When I improvise I always play pentatonic in 12th position
But I need some help because every improvisation sounds like an echo of the other. I really wanna improvise better so my question is: What can I do to make it more variated?
#2
Here's something I did recently when I felt I just got stuck with the same old stuff..

Force yourself into starting from a different point in the scale. In this point, start at a different position and see where you end up?
Even better is to record a chord progression where you force the tonality into something different than what you are used to.
Then play over that and notice how you'll have a different feel when soloing over it.
#3
Quote by Shor
Here's something I did recently when I felt I just got stuck with the same old stuff..

Force yourself into starting from a different point in the scale. In this point, start at a different position and see where you end up?
Even better is to record a chord progression where you force the tonality into something different than what you are used to.
Then play over that and notice how you'll have a different feel when soloing over it.


Thanks
#5
Quote by Trollscience
Hey,

So this is my first thread and I have a question:
When I improvise I always play pentatonic in 12th position
But I need some help because every improvisation sounds like an echo of the other. I really wanna improvise better so my question is: What can I do to make it more variated?

Stop thinking about patterns - the guitar is a musical instrument, you use it to make music therefore your first thought should always be "What SOUND do I want?", not "Ok, it's time to improvise so I'll go to my 12th fret".

For starters that means you're attempting to play Em pentatonic regardless of what you're playing over so it's not going to work all the time, but the important thing is that thinking about where you're playing before you think about what you're playing is completely missing the point. At the moment you're just mindlessly letting yourself play the same things over and over again and hoping it sounds good - that's not playing the guitar, that's the guitar playing you!

You need to have an idea in your head of the sound you want to create, and that means first and foremost listening. Listen to the backing your playing over to see what it suggests to you, and listen to what you end up playing to decide if it's what you wanted, and if it isn't then play something else.

Theory allows you to organise your musical "nuts and bolts" in your mind so you can use them more effectively, and it helps to know what key you're in so you know what scales are likely to apply. However listening and thinking are what will help you improvise properly and those are the two things you aren't really doing. Once you have an idea of what you want to play then your fretboard knowledge is what will guide you and help you find the notes you want, but at the moment your just chucking a load of shit at a wall and hoping some of it sticks.

Best thing to do is forget about your guitar for a little while, don't pick it up, don't even look at it. Just listen to a backing track and see if you can come up with something over it - singing it out loud will help immensely, as will recording it. Once you've got an idea, then you can pick up the guitar and figure out how to play it. YOu need to force yourself into the habit of thinking musically, and sitting there with the guitar makes it too easy for you to fall back into your bad habits and start playing on autopilot again.
Actually called Mark!

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#6
Try and incorporate different lead techniques into your improv. Force yourself to use techniques that you would not normally use. This can help a bit and learn to play in key all over the fretboard.
#7
When I improvise I always play pentatonic in 12th position
But I need some help because every improvisation sounds like an echo of the other. I really wanna improvise better so my question is: What can I do to make it more variated?


... well, Mark has nailed it, but the essence of variation is doing things differently.

i.e., next time, don't play the pentatonic, don't play it in 12th position.

If it seems obvious that's because it is.
#8
some of the lessons in the link in my sig might help but i would also suggest you learn to play all over the neck and not just in one spot. utilizing all kinds of voicings and notes is key. you shouldn't focus so much on the "correct" way of doing things. let things flow out as naturally as you can. eventually it will just come to you.
#9
I have two techniques for soloing:

1. Solo as a variation of the original melody. (Chances are you're playing a lyrical song, and more often than not you're soloing over the verse progression; learn the melody and then fancy it up however you want.)

2. Solo while trying NOT to play the topical melody (but know the melody first.) Your mind will automatically want to play the actual melody, and it will sneak in when you're not looking. It becomes a mind game, and to me, that's fun

A lot of it also depends on the style of music you're playing. If you're playing the blues or classic rock, learn some SRV or even ZZ Top licks, and throw them in there. Learn some Santana solos and use some of his licks. You can always throw a piece here or a piece there that you've learned elsewhere and have it fit completely within the context of the song. There's no way you'll mimic SRV or Santana completely; you will always play it your own way - there's no shame in learning how the masters do it.

Substitute genre and examples to suit your needs, tastes and preferences.