#1
Before any Ramones enthusiasts come in here, This is not the same model that Johnny Ramone was known to play. It has the same name but there were three designs under this name and this guitar is of the third design.

Anyway, Here's the story: I bought this 1966 Ventures II on eBay last week. It's missing these parts: Two Tuners; String Guide; Neck Plate; Neck Screws; Pickups; Pickup Rings; Electronics; Pickguard; Volume and Tone Knobs; And the Pickup Selector Switch Tip. It also either has a poor finish on top of the original finish or it's been refinished, I'm not yet sure which but there is some brighter yellow paint or body filler underneath the trem. I don't have any pictures of my own uploaded at the moment but here's one from the auction:



Whoever painted this didn't take off parts before painting; There's paint on the Bridge, Tremolo, Neck, Strap Pins and Pickguard Screws. Some parts look like they were painted with a brush, Also I think there's hide glue wiped on it and there's duct tape residue on it. Also, The truss rod was tightened far too much and it dug into the wood; Here's another pic taken by the seller, This is of the truss rod hole:



Looks bad, huh? That damage is from someone jamming a screwdriver in to try and pry the truss rod up to adjust it. I was able to loosen it and remove the end, The neck is no longer under a lot of tension. I also made a string guide for the neck, It looks dorky and new but it should serve its purpose if I don't decide to replace it with something more appropriate and if the current one doesn't break under string tension since it's thin.

More updates to come later. I might remove the truss rod and straighten it a bit if it's removable, It could use that. And here's a pic of what it should look like when I'm finished with it. Pictured is a late 1966 or early 1967 Mark V:

Always tin your strings.

_____

Don't be afraid to be honest.
Last edited by Gargoyle2500 at May 16, 2012,
#2
Wow, looks like whoever owned it was a real jackass...

Anyway, best of luck! Should look awesome when you're all done!
Wine is fine but whiskey's quicker!
#3
UPDATE! (Said in Tourettes Guy voice)

I bought an official NOS Mosrite Neck Plate + Screws on eBay this week and now the neck is attached to the guitar. Next up: Tuners. I'll get a Mosrite appropriate set of Klusons.
Always tin your strings.

_____

Don't be afraid to be honest.
Last edited by Gargoyle2500 at May 16, 2012,
#4
Here are my first pics that I took of the guitar:

Body:



End Of Neck (Shows some paint) :



Under Trem Plate:



Headstock and String Guide:



Neck Plate:



Simulating string tension so the neck can adjust:



I'm using a 25 pound bag of magnum shot as weight, It's in a shopping bag to reduce clean up in case the shot bag breaks.
Always tin your strings.

_____

Don't be afraid to be honest.
Last edited by Gargoyle2500 at May 16, 2012,
#5
My Kluson Tuners arrived today; They fit fine but the bushings were too big so I polished the old ones and used them. Here's the headstock with an old tuner to compare.

Front



Back



They're not vintage correct but they turn easily.

Some days ago I put an old High E string on the guitar using an old tuner and I saw how low the action can go: .035 high measured at the 12th fret, Not holding down the string at any fret. The action can go lower than on any other guitar I own or have played. But still, That was when the bridge was as low as it could be adjusted and I still didn't get any buzzing so I made a neck shim that's about 100 thousandths thick so I can try to get lower action. I have a pic of the shim in a rough cut but it seems silly to post it because I don't have a pic of the shim after I finished it. I'll take one later and post both pics.

After I made the shim I decided to check out the bridge. Honestly, I don't like it. The saddles are OK but the inside walls of the bridge are far from square, The bridge rocks on the posts and the screws that hold the saddles are a very soft metal. Anyway, I tried getting the saddles off; I couldn't get the screws out very easily, I broke two of them and damaged a third while taking them off, Some of one's remnants are inside a saddle. Yay! I'm going to have a dandy time getting it out since the saddle is rather fat unlike a Gibson saddle, I think my only option is to drill it out and its a very small hole so you can imagine what I'm thinking here. Its either get it right or mess up and buy a hard to find replacement or make my own replacement. I'm not going to use the original intonation screws that I have left, I'm getting stainless steel replacements.

Coincidentally, After writing that I looked on eBay for a replacement saddle and someone listed 18 stainless steel replacement screws an hour ago.

Edit: I bought the screws. Next up, A saddle if I can find one.
Always tin your strings.

_____

Don't be afraid to be honest.
Last edited by Gargoyle2500 at Dec 19, 2011,
#6
Been a while since I updated this, Time for an update! This update is in two posts due to the number of images.

Rough cut of the shim (Old pic)



Shim, Finished (Now about .095 thick instead of .105)



The shim does allow for lower action but I get more buzzing, I still like the action to be low without the bridge touching the base plate though so I'm keeping the shim.

So, Here's where the real update starts.

Thursday:

The intonation screws arrived, I drilled out the small screw holes on the bridge a bit so they'd fit (The screws are the same size except for length, The bridge screw holes were too small) And I put all saddles except the G saddle back on. The new screws were a bit long so I took the old washers, Put them on the Phillips head side and added more washers of the same size on the opposite side.

Friday: I tried to drill the screw remnant out of the G saddle and failed; The saddle isn't damaged, I stopped the drill press as soon as I saw it was off center.

Saturday: I started polishing the frets:



Today: I bought a titanium drill bit and finished polishing the frets:



I also removed paint from the end of the neck. Before:





Always tin your strings.

_____

Don't be afraid to be honest.
Last edited by Gargoyle2500 at Dec 19, 2011,
#7
After:









I removed more paint on the bottom than seen in the pic.

So what does tomorrow hold? Hopefully I'll finally get the screw out of the saddle without ruining it. I'll secure the saddle well so it won't move while I'm drilling the screw.
Always tin your strings.

_____

Don't be afraid to be honest.
Last edited by Gargoyle2500 at Dec 19, 2011,
#8
pretty interesting dude! i want to buy an old beat up guitar and fix it up too, hope it turns out for the best!
"It's not about who has the biggest stick, it's about how hard you can swing it"
#9
Thanks! Today I tried to drill the screw out of the G saddle and it didn't work, The drill bit broke off inside as deep as I drilled it. All hopes of keeping all the original saddles just went out the window, Now I have to make my own saddle.
Always tin your strings.

_____

Don't be afraid to be honest.
Last edited by Gargoyle2500 at Feb 23, 2012,
#10
It's been a while since I last updated. Long story short, I have some more parts for my guitar now (Pickups and electronics) And I've played it. Let's just say if you've heard the first B-52's album you know how the bridge pickup sounds. I love how it sounds and I love how it plays, I can see why Johnny Ramone played Mosrites too; They're super easy to play that style with.



Here's a B-52's song, I think perhaps Ricky used a set of 11s or heavier strings for this song:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mX9Qdf4P2yA
Always tin your strings.

_____

Don't be afraid to be honest.
Last edited by Gargoyle2500 at Mar 16, 2012,
#12
That's awesome! Good to see some more vintage love here on UG haha. Just needs a pickgaurd and you're ready to rock! I wonder if you could strip of just the re-paint and get to the original paint? People do it on old VW's with easy off oven cleaner (the original, super powerful version).
#13
@Mech-cannibal: "Rock Lobster" Is one of my favorite songs ever but Ricky used a hybrid set of bass and plain guitar strings for that song so for most people it doesn't give a good idea what the guitar sounds like. I think Ricky used a set of 11s or 12s for "Lava" So that's a better choice. The overdrive in that song also gives a great idea what the guitar can do.

@LeviMan_2001: I think the original finish was stripped, The yellow finish under the flat beige looks rather putrid. Mosrite never painted a guitar in a color like that, They did paint them in sunburst but those colors were nice to look at.

Anyway, Ed Elliott will be sending me the Pickguard, Knobs, G string Saddle and Pup Selector Switch Tip soon. After I put the parts on I'll paint the guitar blue but I'm not going to paint it for at least another two or three months, Realistically it probably won't be for another six or seven.
Always tin your strings.

_____

Don't be afraid to be honest.
Last edited by Gargoyle2500 at Feb 24, 2012,
#14
More parts arrived:





I'm happy with them. While I had the guitar apart I put in an anti-shock circuit between the bridge and ground, Now I don't have to worry about dying from electrocution if I ever run into bad wiring in a building. Next, I need the switch tip and non-roller G string saddle. After that I need to: Refinish the body; Get a vibrato arm; And put some shims under some saddles to prevent them from rocking from side to side.
Always tin your strings.

_____

Don't be afraid to be honest.
#15
Quote by Gargoyle2500
More parts arrived:





I'm happy with them. While I had the guitar apart I put in an anti-shock circuit between the bridge and ground, Now I don't have to worry about dying from electrocution if I ever run into bad wiring in a building. Next, I need the switch tip and non-roller G string saddle. After that I need to: Refinish the body; Get a vibrato arm; And put some shims under some saddles to prevent them from rocking from side to side.


You have agood start. I found an original 66 Mosrite at a yard sale no less. The neck was removed, but they had all the pieces. I bought that one for $75.00
I owned a guitar shop for a while, and I did refinishing of guitars. I was able to track down the original paint code and refinish mine. All I need is an original tremelo arm and its complete. This is my third Mosrite, and love it. Good luck with your rebuild
#16
I'm a bit late updating this but a full set of saddles and a switch tip arrived about nine weeks ago. The guitar is perfect for me, I just have to refinish it.
Always tin your strings.

_____

Don't be afraid to be honest.