#1
What would be the best exercise/song to learn/scale/whatever to learn and practice to keep the fingers in my fretting hand working before my picking hand. I've noticed lately that when I'm practicing running scales up and down the fretboard, the fingers on my fretting hand are just barely landing before I pick the string. Is the way it's supposed to be? It hasn't affected me too much yet, but I know that as I increase speed it will become a problem. Before someone gives me the typical answer, use a metronome and work your way up in speed, I've been doing this. How can I gain enough independence in my left and right hand fingers so they are doing different things at different times (I'm a right-handed player if that matters)?
#2
I would try playing some runs at really low BPMs. I think if you just focus on making sure your fingers get there earlier it won't be a hard change.

edit: It's the kind of thing that once you can do it it'll apply to slow and fast playing.
#3
Quote by AndrewB24
What would be the best exercise/song to learn/scale/whatever to learn and practice to keep the fingers in my fretting hand working before my picking hand. I've noticed lately that when I'm practicing running scales up and down the fretboard, the fingers on my fretting hand are just barely landing before I pick the string. Is the way it's supposed to be? It hasn't affected me too much yet, but I know that as I increase speed it will become a problem. Before someone gives me the typical answer, use a metronome and work your way up in speed, I've been doing this. How can I gain enough independence in my left and right hand fingers so they are doing different things at different times (I'm a right-handed player if that matters)?


Basically yes, if you put your fingers down really early you're liable to fall into the trap of not letting notes ring out for their full length. If you're fretting almost as you're picking that just means your hands are synced up well.

And no, it doesn't matter that you're right handed.
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#4
Quote by AndrewB24
It hasn't affected me too much yet, but I know that as I increase speed it will become a problem....

Since you feel this is holding you back, it's probably worth examining.
This type issue can sometimes be traced to very basic mechanics.
A lack of quick release on the current note... or reaching for the next note too soon. etc.
Your fret hand can contradict itself, which prevents fluid motion, and results in what may be perceived as sloppiness or left/right hand synch problems at regular tempo.

So to check for this (no metronome needed)... first play to where you really notice the problem and then isolate a small section where it occurs. Once you have it isolated, repeat it going gradually slower and watch your fret hand... as you do that, look for any point where your fingers are fighting each other.

Go by what you see not how it feels.
Are your fingers acting individually at all times? or is one finger dragging while another is trying to fret the next note. Is every finger releasing it's pressure before the next finger starts its pressure? or not?
That's the type of thing you need to look at. It can be elusive. so keep cycling faster and slower with the problem until you can really see what is happening.

My solution was to basically spend 15-20 minutes a session practicing in slow motion where you make sure that every note is an individual action. And relax in between. (especially during string and position changes)

Any exercise, scale or solo part is OK to use (metronome optional)
But I would say the more technically difficult the better for this type of practice... stuff you consider hard to play is most likely to bring out the trouble for correction.

Eventually start speeding things up, but keep that separation between notes, with quick efficient but relaxed motions. And light fret pressure. You'll begin to build natural instincts for the better.
The point is not that you'll play that way... but you'll lose the tendency to have your fingers tie each other up, and gain better independence needed for faster playing.

hope that made sense... Doing this for a while can bring dramatic changes.
For me, this was about the fastest and most surprising break-through I ever made in my playing.
good luck