#1
Ok, so I've been wondering how would I use the whole tone scale in improvisation? It doesnt have one key, because all the notes are equally apart. I tried it over a bunch of chords, and it seems to work over dominant chords, but are there any rules to the usage of this scale? Any help would be great. Thanks
#2
You got it right with the dominant chords. That's where it's meant to be. The whole purpose of a dominant chord is to create tension (if you take the 3rd and 7th of any dominant chord, together they create a tritone which is where the tension comes from in a standard dominant 7 chord.)

Because the whole idea is to create tension, and whole tone scales don't really fit any particular key or chord it make sense that the whole tone scale helps create the tension.

If that didn't make any sense: Yes, over dominant chords.
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#3
only rule to using it would be to do what makes the sound you want it to(i was going to type good but sounding good might not be the sound you want)
#4
Quote by Doodleface
You got it right with the dominant chords. That's where it's meant to be. The whole purpose of a dominant chord is to create tension (if you take the 3rd and 7th of any dominant chord, together they create a tritone which is where the tension comes from in a standard dominant 7 chord.)

Because the whole idea is to create tension, and whole tone scales don't really fit any particular key or chord it make sense that the whole tone scale helps create the tension.

If that didn't make any sense: Yes, over dominant chords.

that made total sense dude, thanks alot
#5
it works well over dominant chords.
you could also write a whole-toney vamp. its not in one key, but it works over several different dominant (#5) chords. for example C wholetone (C D E F# G# Bb) works on a C dominant chord (#5), a Bb dominant chord (#5),a D dominant chord (#5) a G# dominant chord (b5), an F# dominant chord (b5) and an E dominant chord (b5). basically, it works over an altered dominant chord built on any tone of the scale.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#8
One thing you should try is using it to generate enclosures. An enclosure is when you play the note right above and then right below a chord tone and then the chord tone, so like, going to the third of a C chord, you'd play F-Eb-E. The distance between the F and the Eb is a whole tone, so you could play a bunch of whole tone stuff leading to the enclosure, and it creates a really cool tension and release effect.
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Everytime I go into the guitar shop and ask for a G-String the shopkeeper always makes that TERRIBLE joke about it not being an underwear shop

So next time I go in I'm gonna ask for a thong