#1
So I play in a metal(core) band and my other guitarist is all about "cranking our amps" to get the best tone, so usually at practice we play at some pretty deafening volumes. (7-8 on my 100watt Valveking). Last night we had a mini practice without the bassist and vocalist so I told him we should play at a lower volume (I had my VK at 4 and he matched it with his 5150) The tone dramatically improved and it took out so much of the harshness of playing at higher volumes. And as far as modern metal goes, you really don't want too much power amp distortion.

Anyway, I have a feeling next practice he's going to want to crank the amps again and I was just wondering if I'm right about not cranking them too much. It just seems like when we get the whole band together it turns into a volume war unnecessarily.
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#2
Ah, the volume wars. I do not miss those.

Harshness often comes from a setting achieved at a lower volume then that setting simply being cranked. Often, it is simply not rolling off treble as the volume goes up. There are low volume settings then there are loud volume settings.

Learn the difference.

How you place the amps in a practice setting also has a great deal to with being heard. Having a cab/combo on the floor with the speaker focal point at the knees has a lot to with why someone cranks the volume in order to hear it. Get your speakers aimed at the ears and I am sure some of the volume will not be necessary.

Besides, two guitar set ups need complimentary tones and not competing tones. That may mean that a certain setting for an amp usually played by itself may need to be changed to give another amp some room in the mix.

Set up both amps right next to each other, and figure that out.
#3
Quote by irnmadn88
Ah, the volume wars. I do not miss those.

Harshness often comes from a setting achieved at a lower volume then that setting simply being cranked. Often, it is simply not rolling off treble as the volume goes up. There are low volume settings then there are loud volume settings.

Learn the difference.

How you place the amps in a practice setting also has a great deal to with being heard. Having a cab/combo on the floor with the speaker focal point at the knees has a lot to with why someone cranks the volume in order to hear it. Get your speakers aimed at the ears and I am sure some of the volume will not be necessary.

Besides, two guitar set ups need complimentary tones and not competing tones. That may mean that a certain setting for an amp usually played by itself may need to be changed to give another amp some room in the mix.

Set up both amps right next to each other, and figure that out.

Yeah good point. But I think 7-8 is a little overkill anyhow. Last night we were heard over the drums fine and I was only on 4 and the tone sounded way better. I think it's just a netter of me convincing everyone else to turn down. We don't need power amp distortion anyway.
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#5
every amp has a sweet spot.


and no i wouldn't think you'd want power tube breakup.
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#6
That is ridiculously loud. Could you even hear your drummer?

My 150w solidstate I put at about one o clock and that is plenty loud for just a drummer and myself. If you move bass and another guitar into the mix I could even drop that a hair.
#7
Quote by OceansBetweenUs
That is ridiculously loud. Could you even hear your drummer?

My 150w solidstate I put at about one o clock and that is plenty loud for just a drummer and myself. If you move bass and another guitar into the mix I could even drop that a hair.

well, yes. our drummer also plays ridiculously loud. but I'm sure if I got the other guitarist and bassist to turn down we could all be heard over the drummer still and have good tone. I mean, last night we played without bass and I would almost venture to say it sounded better. I can't wait to hear how we sound with everyone at that volume. haha
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#8
Quote by QuantumMechanix
well, yes. our drummer also plays ridiculously loud. but I'm sure if I got the other guitarist and bassist to turn down we could all be heard over the drummer still and have good tone. I mean, last night we played without bass and I would almost venture to say it sounded better. I can't wait to hear how we sound with everyone at that volume. haha


I have the same issue with another guitar player I jam with. We both play on Deville 2x12's and he just doesn't understand sound dynamics. He stands in front of his amp so he cant hear how loud he is, then gets into it with me when I tell him to turn down. Its like walking on pins and needles.

Bottom line is, yes tube amps sound "better" when you turn them up a bit. But there is a point where its probably going to have the opposite effect. This isn't based in science(that I know of), just my own experience playing on a number of tube amps.
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#9
Quote by teamhex
I have the same issue with another guitar player I jam with. We both play on Deville 2x12's and he just doesn't understand sound dynamics. He stands in front of his amp so he cant hear how loud he is, then gets into it with me when I tell him to turn down. Its like walking on pins and needles.

Bottom line is, yes tube amps sound "better" when you turn them up a bit. But there is a point where its probably going to have the opposite effect. This isn't based in science(that I know of), just my own experience playing on a number of tube amps.

exactly. I feel like grandma buzzkill when I say to turn down but it's for strictly tonal reasons; not because I can't take the volume.

For me I think the sweet spot is around 5. any more and it sounds fizzy and harsh. But I know this really varies between amps. The 5150 doesn't need to be up nearly as much. And I'm guessing you play a very different genre of music than us
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#10
Quote by QuantumMechanix
exactly. I feel like grandma buzzkill when I say to turn down but it's for strictly tonal reasons; not because I can't take the volume.

For me I think the sweet spot is around 5. any more and it sounds fizzy and harsh. But I know this really varies between amps. The 5150 doesn't need to be up nearly as much. And I'm guessing you play a very different genre of music than us


Ohh yeah man, I play classic rock, blues, and a bit of country(Older Country, Think Cash, Bluesy Country). Your right all amps are going to have different sweet spots, and if you want to take it a step further you can say that each "sweet spot" is subjective. You can always try to adjust the EQ once its louder...might make it a bit less fizzy and harsh.
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