#1
Hey guys,
I realize that there is already a massive thread about speed building etc... and I've read all the posts (which I thoroughly enjoyed) but I just have a quick question.... some of you guys are practicing really slow for as long as 30- 1 hour?
When I was studying under Martin Goulding (google him, awesome player) he taught the same principle except it was really slow continuously for 5 minutes for a week and after the week, increase the bpm by a small increment. He does go on to mention however that you may be stuck on a bpm for more than a week, but basically that is his system. What do you guys think? Is it really necessary to play an exercise for an hour or so for 21 days straight? I mean, I have 3 picking exercises and 3 legato exercises that I practice for 5 minutes straight each. So Picking = 15 minutes a day, and Legato = 15 minutes a day, and I'm going to do this for 21 days until I increase the bpm.
I think this will be more effective as I don't think it's necessary for hours and hours of technique practice.... songs and reading notation and theory are more important.
Thoughts?
Thanks, and Cheers!
Paul
#2
I was always told you're supposed to play slowly until you can play it as clean as you humanly are able, then click the BPM up a little and repeat.
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#3
Quote by pncoutts
... I mean, I have 3 picking exercises and 3 legato exercises that I practice for 5 minutes straight each. So Picking = 15 minutes a day, and Legato = 15 minutes a day, and I'm going to do this for 21 days until I increase the bpm...
Paul


So say you practice said exercises at 60 bpm for a total of 15 minutes a day instead of several hour(s) each day; are you going to wait 21 days to increase the tempo slightly? That may be a little too slow and a bit redundant each day for nearly a month. I think you can still practice your technique for your amount of time and still increase the bpm each week as Martin Goulding said.

Edit: Exactly what the guy before me said about playing it as clean as possible is also key.
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Last edited by Happy Meal at Mar 24, 2011,
#4
It really depends on what your goal is. If you're interested in playing solos, especially solos with faster passages in them then a considerable amount of practice is required. To play quickly requires that things be practiced to the point where your brain essentially performs the movements for you. If you think about when you walk there is no conscious thought involved. That is, you aren't thinking to yourself 'left leg, right leg, left leg...'. In fact you won't be paying any attention to the movements in any way at all. None of us were born with this ability. However we have so over practiced walking our brains have assumed responsibility for coordinating the movements for us. To play anything on your guitar with a reasonably high skill component requires that it also be practiced to the point where the brain starts taking over the control of the movements. To try and play things like this any other way unfortunately doesn't work, as movements performed under our conscious control take too long to execute. That is, we simply can't execute them fast enough when consciously trying to do so. The more complex the skill, the more time and effort is required to get the brain to assume responsibility for the execution, hence the longer practice times required.

Hope this sheds a little light!
Last edited by andrew_k at Mar 24, 2011,
#5
get a bunch of shred exercises from shred21 topic and play them 8 hours a day and take it down in 6 months
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#6
Quote by Happy Meal
So say you practice said exercises at 60 bpm for a total of 15 minutes a day instead of several hour(s) each day; are you going to wait 21 days to increase the tempo slightly? That may be a little too slow and a bit redundant each day for nearly a month. I think you can still practice your technique for your amount of time and still increase the bpm each week as Martin Goulding said.

Edit: Exactly what the guy before me said about playing it as clean as possible is also key.

I think you're misunderstanding the 21 days concept.

The idea behind playing something ridiculously slow for 21 days is to establish absolute control over your motions so that when you start ramping up the tempo afterwards (and you can increase tempos more frequently afterwards ) you'll maintain good technique and you'll be so comfortable with the motions that it'll come easily and more importantly it'll remain clean and precise so long as you're keeping to good practice habits afterwards.

Each approach has its benefits and disadvantages. The 21 day method is slow and boring, but I believe you'll generally see more effective results using it. Goulding's method gives measurable results sooner (increasing tempo), which is great for staying motivated. If you maintain strict practicing discipline and only increase the tempo when you've achieved complete mastery at the current tempo then it's probably about as effective as the 21 day method, but if you increase the tempo too soon you may not establish proper control and technique.
Last edited by Nightfyre at Mar 24, 2011,