#1
hi guys i saw a video on youtube that advice u to try to inprovise just on your high E string and try to make a melody with it .... i did that using the G major scale i mean not the shapes but the notes (G A B C D E F#) i always thought that the major scale sound happy but when i played over this notes it was like a sad solo can any one tell me why plz?
srry my english is bad
#2
A major scale does usually have brighter sound to it but you have to remember that a G major contains the same notes as that of an E minor scale, since E is the relative minor of G major. which has a different (slightly low) feel to it. so on a the high E string, depending on the way/order you played the notes, it'd have a sad or brighter sound.

Hope this helps.
#3
Quote by Jayant
A major scale does usually have brighter sound to it but you have to remember that a G major contains the same notes as that of an E minor scale, since E is the relative minor of G major. which has a different (slightly low) feel to it. so on a the high E string, depending on the way/order you played the notes, it'd have a sad or brighter sound.

Hope this helps.

thx ^^
#4
Yea, G major probably wasn't the best choice as each time you use the open string it's going to pull you back to E - try playing around with E major on the E string, that way if you incorporate the open string all it'll do is re-inforce your tonality of E.
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#5
Quote by steven seagull
Yea, G major probably wasn't the best choice as each time you use the open string it's going to pull you back to E - try playing around with E major on the E string, that way if you incorporate the open string all it'll do is re-inforce your tonality of E.

thx i ll do that but i want to understand this relative between the majors and minors scales
#6
Quote by mado-elodie
thx i ll do that but i want to understand this relative between the majors and minors scales

There's nothing much to "understand", it's not particualry relevant in terms of playing the guitar.

The term "relative" just means two scales that share the same notes, that's all - it's knowledge that helps identify scales and work out keys but that's all. It's got next to no practical application when it comes to deciding what to do with your fingers on the fretboard.

Over and above whether or not two scales are relative is a boatload of other information that tells you why those scales share the same notes, what implications that has for the player and how you can use those other scales. That's all the stuff that matters but it's not really something you need to worry about too much. Like I said, it has very little practical application when it comes to playing the guitar, it's more useful for composition and musical analysis.
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#7
Saying a particular scale is the relative minor of another major scale basically means that they're composed of the same notes. the only thing that differs is which note you start from. and that sets the tone of the song. Using this concept is quite handy when you're improvising on the guitar.
you can figure out the relative minor of a major scale quite easily...its the sixth note in the major scale. alternatively you can figure out which is the corresponding major scale of the minor by the third note in the minor scale. so for a G major it is the E minor, for C major its the A minor and so on.

now that we know this concept we can implement it while playing. say a song is in the key of G major, you can play a piece in the G major scale or you can try improvising on the E minor. you can even play the E minor pentatonic scale. each adds a different flavour to the song.
#8
Quote by Jayant
Saying a particular scale is the relative minor of another major scale basically means that they're composed of the same notes. the only thing that differs is which note you start from. and that sets the tone of the song. Using this concept is quite handy when you're improvising on the guitar.
you can figure out the relative minor of a major scale quite easily...its the sixth note in the major scale. alternatively you can figure out which is the corresponding major scale of the minor by the third note in the minor scale. so for a G major it is the E minor, for C major its the A minor and so on.

now that we know this concept we can implement it while playing. say a song is in the key of G major, you can play a piece in the G major scale or you can try improvising on the E minor. you can even play the E minor pentatonic scale. each adds a different flavour to the song.

Sorry, but that's completely wrong.

There is no such thing as "playing the relative minor", in the situation you've described all that's happening is that you're using G major all the time. What note you start from is irrelevant, it doesn't change a thing in a playing context. The chords you're playing over define the tonal centre, which in turn defines the root note of any scales you use. If you're playing over a backing in the key of G major then G major is the scale you'll be using, E minor doesn't exist - you don't get a choice in the matter, the chords have made the decision for you.
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#9
alright may be i didn't quite phrase it right. the tonal center of the song IS defined by the chords you're playing. but as for as improvising over it is concerned you can definitely play the relative minor. hence the concept of modes. it'll be the Aeolian or the sixth mode of that particular major scale. playing the relative E minor over a backing track in G major merely adds a different feel to it. and it won't sound off scale so long as you emphasize on the right notes. it can't, considering they both contain identical notes.

and as for playing pentatonics, the major penta and its relative minor penta have the same notes. the scales merely start off from a different root note.
Take Coming Back To Life for example. the song is in C major and Gilmour sticks to the A minor pentatonic box for the most part. addind a note from the C major scale here and there. hence proving you can play a relative minor pentatonic over a song in the key of a major scale just as long you end up at the right notes.
#10
Again, no you can't - regardless of what you might think you're doing, in reality you aren't doing anything other than playing the G major scale, no relative minors, no modes, nothing other than that major scale. It doesn't "add a different feel" or do anything of the sort, because you're not actually doing anything different.
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