#1
First of all, I'm aware I don't come anywhere near the godlike mark that Spencer Sotelo sets before you point this out! This is just a short section of the song 'All New Materials' because I would like some feedback on my screamed vocals and whether or not the very last note counts or not try to hold in the laughs!
cheers!
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/16939147/periphery%20chorus.mp3
#3
As said above: Not bad.
Nice vocal range, not a lot of people are able to sing that high. You should focus on pitch and the purity of your notes. (Breathcontrol)
But you definitely have potential!
#4
Not bad dude, you sound better than Spencer does live most nights. Your screams are pretty solid. My only recommendation is that you work on thinking about the note you're about to hit before you hit it a little more. A lot of the times your pitch is good and you tend to correct yourself when you initially miss the note, pinpointing the note in your head will just help you get a better grasp on where it is so you don't under/over shoot it.
Gibson Les Paul Studio Deluxe/Ibanez RGA42/LTD EC401vf
Into:
Whammy IV>Pitchblack>Dunlop 536Q>Fulltone Fulldrive 2>Hardwire TL-2>MXR 10 Band>Line 6 M13
Into:
80s Carvin x100b w/ cab
#5
high D's always make me smile =D
yeah I agree great range and nice tone but some slight problems in hitting the note initially rather than sliding up to it

I've had the same problem for a while as well, and so far the best cure seems to be playing scales on your instrument at a fast tempo and trying your best at hitting the exact notes as you're playing them. Don't just do the usual major/minor scales on an octave, try to vary it a bit so it's almost a melody going up and down randomly but still sticking in the key you've chosen. that sounds a bit confusing but hopefully you get what I'm going for, just go up and down a scale however you want to but make sure you're doing it at fast speed and staying within the key.