#1
From this I hope to learn as much as I can about playing progressive rock. I know extensive music theory, but I would like to know more about complex keys and key changes. Also about complex time signatures and signature changes. PLease? Thanks! =D
#2
Quote by xxDROXxx
From this I hope to learn as much as I can about playing progressive rock. I know extensive music theory, but I would like to know more about complex keys and key changes. Also about complex time signatures and signature changes. PLease? Thanks! =D


What specifically would you like to know, young traveler?
Think For Yourself, Question Authority - Dr. Timothy Leary


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#3
How to put all of my theory into use. Also how I could do/use key changes and time signature changes. Also ways to write progressive music in a band/group setting. =)
#4
You know about simple, compound, and unusual meter and how to read keys and determine keys (Circle of Fifths, Fourths, etc.), correct?
Think For Yourself, Question Authority - Dr. Timothy Leary


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#5
Quote by Inbleach
You know about simple, compound, and unusual meter and how to read keys and determine keys (Circle of Fifths, Fourths, etc.), correct?

Yes. I read music theory books for fun.
But I problem I have found is applying it.
Last edited by xxDROXxx at Mar 25, 2011,
#6
Well if you're playing in a band setting for progressive music I'd advise having a drummer that knows his time signatures and can keep rhythm in said T.S. It can be somewhat difficult to switch as a full band at times times especially if you're slowing down and going to something like 2/4-12/8 and your drummer is off. You won't often find any T.S. that doesn't have a 2,4,8,16,32, etc. on the bottom or it's an irrational meter and I can' tell you much about that because they're used pretty infrequently and it's not something I touch on a lot. Key changes can be a bit difficult to transition at times. It's better to go into the transition with a chord that fits within both keys, at least that's the way I do it, (e.g. Cm and Gm both share an Eb, Bb, G, C, D, and F chord), So if you're going from Cm key and playing like C, D, Bb, Eb, use that as your transition point between the two keys. Prog uses strange chords at times, If you're sound in your key knowledge you should be able to whip something up with your scale degrees (Tonic, Subton, Med, Superton, etc.).

If that doesn't work, learn jazz guitar and buy a delay pedal.
Think For Yourself, Question Authority - Dr. Timothy Leary


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#7
Thanks a lot! =) I do play jazz, acoustic anything, and metal... I really try to learn everything I can. I am a Dream Theater fanatic, and I know what I could be (with hundreds of years of practice) So... yeah...
#8
Quote by xxDROXxx
Thanks a lot! =) I do play jazz, acoustic anything, and metal... I really try to learn everything I can. I am a Dream Theater fanatic, and I know what I could be (with hundreds of years of practice) So... yeah...


Eh, It wouldn't take you that long. Just practice every day and the easiest thing to do is just to go outside of your element and learn everything. Country, Bluegrass, Folk, Jazz, Blues, Standard Rock (I, IV, V), etc.

The more influences you have the better your music will sound (from a prog standpoint). Just take your time and make sure you have things down before moving on to something else. I'd also advise getting a metronome if you don't already have one, those help A LOT.
Think For Yourself, Question Authority - Dr. Timothy Leary


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#9
time signatures arent really that important (once you know how to count)--what you should work on is rhythmic studies. practice playing four quarter notes, then 4 eighth notes, then 4 sixteenths, then go into two triplets followed by two eighth notes (perfectly in time, strong tone, with the rhythms well defined), and then one triplet followed by one eighth note, then a triplet followed by an eighth note rest and an eighth note on the off beat, then work in quarter note triplets, 5-tuplets, and 7-tuplets (of the quarter and eighth note variety) while staying in four, and switching from the hemiolas (tuplets--rhythms that superimpose a figure more likely to occur in a different time signature) to regular four/four rhtyhms. then practice playing stuff in 5 and 7---try taking melodies you know, and phrasing them so they work in 5 (either/4 or /8) and 7 and 3 (or 6), and then do the same rhythmic stuff you did in four in 5 and 7. do this with a metronome until its PERFECT. being good at hemiola and syncopation in 4 will do you much better then having an ok rhythmic understanding of four and trying to make 5 or 7 work.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Mar 25, 2011,
#10
Quote by Inbleach
I'd also advise getting a metronome if you don't already have one, those help A LOT.

I know! Haha it is crazy how much they really do! =) I spend hours doing exercises, and countless more hours writing every style of music. I just lately am struggling to find anything I have written to improve on....
#11
Compose something using modal interchange and then use a functioning altered dominant to bring it back to the I, and devise a melodic approach for each chord.

And for a bit of a controversial curve ball, I'd suggest that if you can't apply theory that you don't really yet "know it". The whole point is having it for something that you can use. This is why I insist on theory being taught with application.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Mar 25, 2011,
#12
Making progressive music means making music that is forward thinking, without trying it to be.

Playing 'weird' time signatures and frequent key changes isn't new or progressive for that matter, and it seems like you think that you have to incorporate those things in your music.

My two cents.