#1
For self bettering purposes I want to learn my chords - Yea I can play 'em but Id have no idea what to do If you randomly asked me to play a diminished C chord.

What is a fast way of learning them, I'd like to be able to connect chord names with finger patterns.

Same with scales - I don't know many, although most are just identical patterns going up or down N steps
KING DIAMOND LOVES OLD LADIES
#2
Learn theory? That way you won't have to learn each individual chord, but deduce how to properly finger them.

Q#m
e|--6--|
B|--5--|
G|--7--|
D|--7--|x2586
A|--5--|
E|-----|


Play until she breaks up with you.

The most brutal band to ever exist is...

You should go like them...even if you don't like them.


-Sloppyjoe24
#3
your going to have to learn the notes on the fretboard, learn some theory (how to build chords) and get familiar with some common voicings (this is not as much work as it sounds).
a good way to start is to learn open position chords---go look up some beatles songs or something on this site, and it will show you chords, with voicings.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#4
Have a look at our site in my sig below, as we teach these things and how to apply them.

By the way, if someone randomly asked you to play a diminished chord, you could use it as the vii in the key and resolve to the root. Also you could look at it as a rootless dominant.

Another way you could use it is as a leading chord for many chords where you are moving by step. Say in C you could have a Cmaj7 C#o Dm7 Ebo Em7 etc.

If you didn't understand any of that, I can relate, but we do teach these kinds of things, in our online school, which does focus upon applied theory and fretboard mastery. I could also tell you that you'd learn to instantly tell that person that a C dim is C Eb Gb, and if you want a C dim7 you'd get a C Eb Gb Bbb, and if you couple that with mastering being able to instantly find the notes on the neck (which is the first course at our Academy that students take) then you could play it any way you wish!

If I can answer any questions, just feel free to PM me. This stuff isn't as hard as it seems to be, because of how we teach it, but it can be hell trying to learn it by yourself.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Mar 25, 2011,
#5
i say to learn a bit of theory so you can understand and construct chords, like everyone else said.

start with basic three note chords, played on three strings. get a good feel for why they sound the way they sound (for example, if you're learning the minor chord, just note that it's all about the minor third on the root of the chord). then look at the common full chords that guitarists commonly use and figure out why they are what they are. same goes for four-note chords... and beyond.
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