#1
Ok so you know how you would number the chords in C major as I II III IV V VI VII instead of C Dm Em F G Am Bm? How would I number this progression?


In case it does not want to work, I wrote out the chords as:
Ab6 C9 G7(11) Am7 Fmaj7 Bbmaj7 Cm7 Gm(b6)


So what sort of numerical pattern would these chords be written as?
Attachments:
Questionable Progression 1.gp5
Questionable Progression 2.gp4
Questionable Progression 3.gp3
Last edited by YesterdaysToday at Mar 25, 2011,
#2
Quote by YesterdaysToday
Ok so you know how you would number the chords in C major as I II III IV V VI VII instead of C Dm Em F G Am Bm? How would I number this progression?


In case it does not want to work, I wrote out the chords as:
Ab6 C9 G7(11) Am7 Fmaj7 Bbmaj7 Cm7 Gm(b6)


So what sort of numerical pattern would these chords be written as?


Well a lot of people do it differently. If you were using a Nashville numbering system you'd do it one way, and if you were MIKE DODGE you'd use all UPPERCASE with the type as in IIm, and as for me and how I teach it I use uppercase for Major and lowercase for minor. Though Its good to know how to define and see all of these.

Here's the thing with your progression. My first instinct is to see this in C minor. It really depends upon where I find the tonal center.

Assuming that i find it in C minor, I'd make this...

vi6 I9 V7 (11 or sus depending on the 3rd) bv7 IVmaj7 im7 v(b6)

Mike might write:

VIm6 I9 V7/11 bVm7 Im7 Vm(b6)

I cant type in subscript so Nashville would really look bad here.

In all honesty I'd think twice before committing something to notation in the case of your chord examples, because the main point is clarity, and I might do it if I knew that the other musicians understood it completely, but if not...then I'd do what worked in the situation I was in.

Best,

Sean
#4
No problem man. To be honest, I've never been faced with a challenge like this in the real world, so I'm not speaking from experience. This was just the 3 ways that I'd know how to do it.

I can see why Mike uses all uppercase, as sometimes you see a lowercase where you didnt expect to see one, and it can throw you for a second, but with Mike, you see the uppercase and have it qualified with a lowercase m you know it's a minor. His is sort of between mine and Nashville, and depending upon how complex it is, it may be the better choice at times.

Best,

Sean
#5
Hey, do you know the scale patterns between chords such as a C major I - IV pattern would be a C major scale etc...?

If the proggresion is [vi I V bv IV im v(b6)]
What scale would I play from
vi - I
V - bv
IV - im
v(b6) - vi
?
Last edited by YesterdaysToday at Mar 25, 2011,
#6
Quote by YesterdaysToday
Hey, do you know the scale patterns between chords such as a C major I - IV pattern would be a C major scale etc...?
If you're asking if you would play C Major... then yes.

If the proggresion is [vi I V bv IV im v(b6)]
What scale would I play from
vi - I

C Major

V - bv

I would just use C Major, but I would alter the scale to accommodate the Gbm. Also, accent the chord tones of the Gbm chord.

IV - im

One of my favorite minor progressions... I would use straight C Melodic Minor.

v(b6) - vi

C Minor, and then change to C Major over the vi. A fun thing to do would be to hang onto the Bb and resolve that to the A when you change chords. You could also treat the v(b6) as an EbM7 chord making the progression a bIIIM7 - vi and use Eb Major/Lydian and then go down to C Major when you hit the vi. Or just alter the C Major scale.

In reality, the whole thing is in C Major. You just have some borrowed chords here and there that need to be accounted for.