#1
so if i'm correct, a time sig like 7/8 would be counted as 2 sets of duplet eighth notes and 1 triplet (XyXyXyy) does this mean each eighth note is equally spaced, or are the triplets faster, so would 7/8 be equal to 3 quarter notes? this is really hard to explain i hope some1 understands and can help me :p
#3
The term "triplet" shouldn't have anything to do with this. 7/8 is simply 7 8th notes, equally spaced.
#4
Also, the cool thing about odd meters are the multiple grouping options (i.e. 2+2+3, 2+3+2, or 3+2+2 for 7/8)
#6
Whatever you do has to fit in the overall time and space of those subdivisions. Think about the core pulse. If you need a 16th triplet in an 8th note pulse thats going to be faster than 2 duplets which are happening in the space of an 8th note. Keep the big picture in mind.

What do I have to play?

How much space do I have to start and complete it over (1/4 note, 1/8th note etc)

Sean
#7
7/8 isn't additive meter. Additive meter is like 3+2+4/4, where you have multiple time signatures "added" into one series. 7/8 is just a single time signature.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#9
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
^You could easily write 7/8 as an additive meter, like 2+2+3/8. Additive time signatures are just a notational thing that clarifies beat structure.
Absolutely 7/8 could be written as an additive meter, it just seems to me that TS is mistaking the difference in definitions between an additive meter and a complex meter.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Mar 26, 2011,
#11
Well, Food and I are basically talking about actual additive meters. Additive meters are when you have the grouping of the beats as the top number. So, instead of 7/8 you could write 2+2+3/8 to show how the eighths will be grouped.



That's what one looks like in notation, although that's an example of 8/8.

As for Sean's post, I don't have a clue what he's talking about.
#12
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Well, Food and I are basically talking about actual additive meters. Additive meters are when you have the grouping of the beats as the top number. So, instead of 7/8 you could write 2+2+3/8 to show how the eighths will be grouped.



That's what one looks like in notation, although that's an example of 8/8.

As for Sean's post, I don't have a clue what he's talking about.
Yep.

3+2+2/8 would be another additive meter of 7/8. It's just specifying a different way to divide the accents. As you said, 7/8 generally implies 2+2+3 or 2+2+2+1, but unless you specify, it's not considered an additive meter, it's just a complex or irregular meter.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Mar 26, 2011,