#1
Hey guys, had a thought while in work earlier.
What would be the best advice you have been given or read or what ever which has had a profound affect on your playing?
For me, I remember seeing a Victor Wooten interview in which he claimed the notes that you DONT play are far more important. There probably a few people who have claimed this but it had really made me think when constructing my own basslines about how busy they were and serving myself as apposed to the song.
So, share your little bass nuggets hear
#4
"You won't learn anything until you fail a million and one times."
"You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life. "

"If you're going through hell, keep going."

"It is a fine thing to be honest, but it is also very important to be right."

- Sir Winston Churchill
#5
I'll quote my buddy Elgin on this one, "Just listen to the goddamn drummer!"
Fender 5 String Jazz Bass
Fender Precision Bass
Peavey TNT 115
EHX Bass Big Muff Pi
Daneletro Cool Cat OD V2 (excellent pedal)
Paul Reed Smith SE Custom Semi-Hollow
Peavey Classic 30
Vox V845 Classic Wah Pedal
#6
"Its' not a guitar, its just some wood, some wire and some metal bits." paraphraseing of a tom morello quote.

"Slow down"
no sir away a papaya war is on
#8
"a few great notes are better than too many"
<Insert Witty Comment Here>

1981 Fender Lead I Seymour Duncan humbucker, Mesa BoogieIIIRectifer, MKIIRhodes,PRS
#9
From the Fender website:
FN: Any suggestions for aspiring bassists?
TC: Make sure you don’t play your bass down by your ankles (laughs)! Or else some guy who plays his bass up by his neck might end up playing your songs! Keep the bass jacked up to your neck. I like to see it as more of a “bib” than a “belt” (laughs again)! When you hit the strings to where they vibrate in line with the pickups instead of smacking into the magnets when it’s down low—you know what I’m saying; that’s no way to get a clean sound. That forces good technique. And good technique, whether you’re riding a bike or playing a bass, that’s how you learn how to do it right—by starting with the right technique.

And I don’t consider myself a great bass player. I do not consider myself technically proficient. I’m not Jaco. I learned how to play my instrument the wrong way and became lucky enough to become a professional musician. Then I made the choices right then and there to go, “Wait a minute—I need to learn to play my instrument the right way.” After I’d been in Rage for two years, I decided that I needed to jack my bass up. I needed to focus on that. I needed to do it right, so I changed my technique. All of a sudden, my playing got so much better. That and playing the drums. Getting a drum set at my house made me play bass so much better.
#10
dont try to copy someone else just play your own style
Quote by Bass First
Rump, a P-bass delivers a rump in the sound such that, similar to the rump on an African American woman, it is the highlight of the tone.
#11
"A teacher makes a world of difference, or failing that, a good book." comes to mind.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#12
A few that first come to mind are...


"The dirt keeps the funk", "If you don't fell it, don't play it" ~ James Jamerson

"Notes are expensive, spend them wisely" ~ B.B. King
Quote by MetlHed94



Well played, sir, well played.
#13
practice, practice, and practice

and not just playing the thing or mindlessly wheedling n thumpin about.
distraction free, goal oriented, consistent, persistent, honest, hard working practice.
#14
play less.

true creativity is the willingness to steal everything you hear and use it in your playing. there are three steps. imitation wherein you play everything note for note. internalization wherein you understand it to where you can play in the style of a particular player without just copping licks. finally innovation where your own voice develops from all this.

solos should be melodies, not scale exercises.
#DTWD
#15
Quote by primusfan

solos should be melodies, not scale exercises.


so much this
Quote by UraniYum
Fuck you I'm trying to be caring and shit


Quote by Cb4rabid
Okay guys, I have a confession to make. Not really a confession since it's something that's been bugging me for awhile but I've always been in denial about it.

**** you gilly, it's not what you think
#16
Music isn't a competition. If you're in it to beat everyone else; you're in it for the wrong reasons. Focus on being the best you can and enjoy it every step of the way. Don't worry about someone who's faster or knows more licks or riffs. Learn what you can for the pure enjoyment of it. That, and play with other people. You won't believe how much better you get just by playing with other people.

Those were the two best pieces of advice I've received.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#17
Some awesome bits of advice here...that Tim Comerford thing was very cool Spaz, and something I went through myself...about 2 years into playing I shifted my bass right up and BAM got a whole lot better...

As for advice, its not specific to bass,and similiar to what Mr Morello said, I believe its from an old Larry Lalonde interview, when he was talking about being taught by Joe Satriani...

It's just wood and strings, there are rules,but most can be broken,and sometimes the wrong note is the best note...

Ler then goes on to state that perhaps he follows the last bit too much
Quote by the humanity
I'm just joking Moog. you know nothing can tear our friendship apart, not even the fact we are miles apart, I am right there beside you, yelling, "Chug it, ya little wimp!"
#18
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Learn drum theory and listen to vocalists.


This, i think, is the best one yet. I fiddle with drums and my bass playing has gotten so much better because of it. And now im starting to hum or sing my more melodic basslines as compared to the bump and thump of slap and pop.


That and playing with other people.
Last edited by Rapt at Mar 28, 2011,
#20
A couple: don't play fast to begin with and also agree with the post about what notes aren't played as as important as what are.

And when playing live: the most important note is the next one.