#1
This may be a stupid question, but something I read here a few days ago made me doubt myself.

Are most drums recorded in stereo or mono? I suppose technically it would be multi-mono since there are a number of things being mic'd. To be more exact, should I have my crashes and rides panned out in the stereo field, or just right down the middle?


I normally pan them out and leave the bass and snare through the middle.
#2
Quote by whatadrag
I normally pan them out and leave the bass and snare through the middle.


that's how it's done most times these days. normally there is atleast a left and right overhead mic, which will be panned out (as a general rule, not ALL the way, otherwise your drum kit will sound as if it's like, 50 feet wide .). if you're close-micing the toms, you can pan them around a little bit too, don't over-do it though. some people even pan the snare out very slightly from time to time, it's not normally very noticeable though.

EDIT -
frankibo pretty much worded what i meant in a much shorter form. you just have to decide if you're gunna pan it as if you're standing in front of the kit, as if youre watching the drummer. or behind it, so you're hearing it from the drummers point of view, if you understand what i mean
I deeply regret the 6661 in my username. Siiiigh. Damn you, 14 year old me, you edgy little bastard.
Last edited by Carl6661 at Mar 26, 2011,
#3
Pan them out like the drum kit is set out, it makes sense if you think about it. So yeah have the bass central, snare ever so slightly left etc etc.
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#4
i personally have my overheads panned all the way out. this is because the left mic pics up some of the right side of the drum kit and same for the right mic so it doesn't come out sounding unnaturally wide. it spreads the whole kit across the entire field. that's just how you do a stereo mic setup... they're working together, not separate.

i keep my snare and kick up the middle with the hat a little off to the right and the ride an equal distance off to the left.

toms i line up with where they sound like they are in the overheads. that way there's no disagreement between overheads and toms and they have a more precise placement. this also keeps the drummer from doing tom fills that go completely around the outside of the band. all the drummers i know dont have arms long enough to do that, so why make it sound like that... a lot of mixers will have toms mostly L, mostly R, and a little off center for the middle tom, so decide what works best for you.

if they're MIDI drums, you have to place crashes right where you want them, you cant really do overheads like you can with a real kit.
#5
Quote by sandyman323
i personally have my overheads panned all the way out. this is because the left mic pics up some of the right side of the drum kit and same for the right mic so it doesn't come out sounding unnaturally wide. it spreads the whole kit across the entire field. that's just how you do a stereo mic setup... they're working together, not separate.


yeah, it all depends a bit on where your mics are and the how they're angled, the size of the kit, and that kind of stuff. but it's certainly worth bearing in mind, atleast.

snare mic's often pick up high-hats aswell, so when that's blended with overheads, you often don't need to pan the high-hat all that much. assuming you are planning on mic'ing it, that is. alot of people i've met simply don't bother as a mix of snare mic', overheads and rooms mic's (if you're using them) do the job just fine. there's no harm in mic'ing it up if there's another mic and input going spare though.

i'm by no means a genius at this stuff, or a pro' though, i'm only passing on things i've learned and what works for me.
I deeply regret the 6661 in my username. Siiiigh. Damn you, 14 year old me, you edgy little bastard.
Last edited by Carl6661 at Mar 27, 2011,