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#1
I've been contemplating becoming a teacher for years. I'm now in a position where I've really got to make plans for my life after University now. Right now it's rather easy for me to follow up becoming a teacher in the UK at secondary school. Oldest I'd teach would be 16. I'd most likely try being trained in teaching Religious Education (a serious subject in secondary schools - I may also be teaching geography and history). Due to the way education is set up in the UK, it's looking less interesting. I not keen of the idea of teaching young teenagers.

Looking around though, New Zealand, Canada and the States have education systems where I could teach an age group which I'd prefer. For example, I could pursue teaching history to 14-18 year olds in the states.

I was wondering what I could expect, being a young man from Southern England coming to teach in those countries with that age group. Asking how I'd be treated as an Englishmen is something I'm better off doing on a forum with lots of Americans who have gone through the American school system instead of a careers person on campus

All other comments are welcome.

tl;dr - justin beibr sux

EDIT: I'm currently studying History and Philosophy and getting good grades. If I'm lucky next year with hard work, I might be able to squeeze myself into a distinction.
Last edited by Craigo at Mar 27, 2011,
#2
Well, if you come to New Zealand you would be another awesome Englishman in my country, and theres nothing wrong with that

I've no idea if teaching teenagers would be a bad thing if you are english though. I'm pretty sure we don't discriminate against the English, unless you sound like a chav

That edit again:

Just something to note, as far as time differences go. It is 6am here in Hobbiton. Perfect essay writing time for uni students with things due at midday



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Last edited by that guy again at Mar 27, 2011,
#3
If they can understand the teacher, most students won't care about any accent he/she has. Obviously, they'll make fun of you behind your back, and the less intelligent ones might insult you to your face, but that happens to 99% of teachers here.

Other than that, I can't really think of anything. I don't really know anything about secondary schools in the UK, so I don't really know what other useful information I can give.

Do you have any specific questions?

EDIT: I'm American.

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#4
Canada seems pretty open to most people from other countries. This year alone we had new students come from Germany, Chile, England and some place in Africa (cba to find out where) and they've all been treated the same as any Canadian born student would be. I'd say it would be the same for teachers. I would shit bricks if you taught at my highschool next year, however unlikely that would be
#5
Teachers in the US get shit pay, apparently. I don't know about elsewhere though.

I plan on teaching something History/World Religions too.
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#6
i cant see you getting a job teaching in Canada, as we have way way way way way too many teachers and not enough teaching positions,

but hey, ya never know
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#7
Quote by Pat_s1t
Canada seems pretty open to most people from other countries. This year alone we had new students come from Germany, Chile, England and some place in Africa (cba to find out where) and they've all been treated the same as any Canadian born student would be. I'd say it would be the same for teachers. I would shit bricks if you taught at my highschool next year, however unlikely that would be

Still got another year and a half of my undergraduates and then I got to go through teachers training. Gonna take a little while!

And I'm genuinely quite glad with the responses. May I ask though to Canadians and Kiwis what religious education over there is like (if at all)? Also, how's your experience with history too (in all three countries)?
#8
Quote by bradulator
Teachers in the US get shit pay, apparently. I don't know about elsewhere though.

I plan on teaching something History/World Religions too.

Yeah, UK teachers I believe get better pay. And with better worker rights. And are actually treated with better esteem it seems. I've got to weigh things out though. I might seriously be happier with less money but teaching a better age group.

I'm more inclined to the States. I don't actually know why. I should prefer Canada
#9
Religious education is for primary schools and universities in New Zealand, and in saying that, it is (hopefully(no offense) if not already) on the way out of primary schools as we are moving away from being affiliated with religion as a nation.

So basically, by the time you become a teacher, religious studies could be left to tertiary education in New Zealand atleast



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#10
Is there a reason you can't teach sixth form? I'm pretty sure some schools do A level RE and if not then there's Philosophy & Ethics and other similar subjects.
#11
Englishman? If you plan on teaching in the USA with any group of kids 15 or younger, prepare for Harry Potter jokes. 16 or older, prepare for Monty Python jokes (half of which they don't understand).

Seriously though, the United State's school system sucks, don't come here if you take teaching seriously.
#12
Hey Craigo,

Do your PGCE and NQT year first. With those, you can teach anywhere in the world. If you train in teaching overseas you don't have that flexibility.
#13
You won't have any luck teaching religious education in a Canadian public school. If you could actually manage to secure a job teaching in Canada, the benefits, pay, and work conditions are significantly better than in America. That being said, if you could actually manage to secure a job teaching is a pretty big issue. There are a lot of teachers here.
#14
Come to America.


Please, think of the children. I've never heard of religious education in the states, or at least in public schools. Catholic schools would of course. A lot of History and Geography teachers suck but then again, our education system sucks.
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#15
Well, if you're going to a major city in Canada, get ready to be get drunk like every night.

Pretty much.
#17
Becoming a teacher is a noble thing, but I don't think you should limit yourself to teaching only one woman in three different countries.
#18
Quote by that guy again
Religious education is for primary schools and universities in New Zealand, and in saying that, it is (hopefully(no offense) if not already) on the way out of primary schools as we are moving away from being affiliated with religion as a nation.

So basically, by the time you become a teacher, religious studies could be left to tertiary education in New Zealand atleast



Religious Education in England isn't about being religious, it's about educating kids about many different religions and the history and mythology and culture associated with them.
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#20
Quote by esther_mouse
Religious Education in England isn't about being religious, it's about educating kids about many different religions and the history and mythology and culture associated with them.


They hardly teach that at all in the US. I didn't receive any kind of religious education (outside of a church) until I was at university. At public schools where religious studies are offered, they're almost universally elective classes.

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#21
Quote by Das_Skittles
They hardly teach that at all in the US. I didn't receive any kind of religious education (outside of a church) until I was at university. At public schools where religious studies are offered, they're almost universally elective classes.

There were absolutely no classes at my school. It was practically a church anyway.
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#22
Quote by Das_Skittles
They hardly teach that at all in the US. I didn't receive any kind of religious education (outside of a church) until I was at university. At public schools where religious studies are offered, they're almost universally elective classes.



Ahh that sucks...Mind you, I thought RE was probably the most boring class ever at school, haha. It was mandatory though - even though I didn't take it as a GCSE subject (year ten and eleven, age 15/16) we still had to have a half hour RE class each week. In year eleven we mostly just watched movies like GATTACA and discussed any moral and ethics issues relating to it. In years seven to nine, though, we learned about Islam, Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Sikhism...
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#23
Oh Craigo also, regarding all the people here saying "oh we don't have RE in my country", it doesn't matter. Once you have your QTS you can teach ANYTHING - as long as you can prove you're competent in it. You may be able to teach something similar to philosophy or ethics or whatever, under a different name to RE. It's more about your degree once you have your QTS than what you actually did a PGCE in.

Even more so abroad.
#24
Don't come to America to teach. If I wind up teaching, I'm going to try my best to go somewhere else.
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#25
If you want to teach in a America you'll have to practice saying 'How do I reach these keeeds?'
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#26
You'd probably hate it in America but god to we need good teachers.
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#27
If you come to the US... the idea of teaching "religious studies" is foreign here. In most of America they do nothing even coming close to investigating religions and the other parts if you say anything other than "Jesus on a cross" they will.... (I apologize) crucify you.

However, history and philosophy are widely accepted in the age range of US "high school" which is around the 15-18 year old range. You could definitely teach those. However, for the most part, if you want to teach in the US for subjects and common as History and Philosophy you will end up in low-income areas. The only teachers that have free reign to go into nicer areas and really get a job without a huge amount of competition are those willing to teach in the sciences. Everyone else sort of bickers for positions in "bad schools." This is a bit of a stereotype admittedly, but it also holds true in a lot of cases. Some people don't run into that issue... but it is certainly present and with the bad economy is becoming more and more prevalent as school as dropping down the number of liberal arts type teachers they employ.

Also note that, in the US, teaching in a non-university format is a very low-paying job compared to what most developed countries pay educators.

Hope that helps.
#29
Quote by ZanasCross
If you come to the US... the idea of teaching "religious studies" is foreign here. In most of America they do nothing even coming close to investigating religions and the other parts if you say anything other than "Jesus on a cross" they will.... (I apologize) crucify you.

However, history and philosophy are widely accepted in the age range of US "high school" which is around the 15-18 year old range. You could definitely teach those. However, for the most part, if you want to teach in the US for subjects and common as History and Philosophy you will end up in low-income areas. The only teachers that have free reign to go into nicer areas and really get a job without a huge amount of competition are those willing to teach in the sciences. Everyone else sort of bickers for positions in "bad schools." This is a bit of a stereotype admittedly, but it also holds true in a lot of cases. Some people don't run into that issue... but it is certainly present and with the bad economy is becoming more and more prevalent as school as dropping down the number of liberal arts type teachers they employ.

Also note that, in the US, teaching in a non-university format is a very low-paying job compared to what most developed countries pay educators.

Hope that helps.

It's horrible how true this is.
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#31
Quote by genghisgandhi
I hate when people say "Don't come to America, you'll hate it here." Not everyone is a bible-thumping redneck. America is a really interesting place. Plus your pay will be supplemented by women who'll be attracted to you by your accent.

I agree on the diversity. We're one of the largest and more diverse developed countries in terms of landmass. That makes for a diverse amount of people. I was raised in the Midwest/South so going to the Northeastern areas, like New York, would be a totally different world to me. California is pretty different from where I live.

The west coast would be more expensive but it would suit you more. And American women seem to love English accents. Hell, I love English accents.
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brot pls
#32
Quote by BladeSlinger
I agree on the diversity. We're one of the largest and more diverse developed countries in terms of landmass. That makes for a diverse amount of people. I was raised in the Midwest/South so going to the Northeastern areas, like New York, would be a totally different world to me. California is pretty different from where I live.

The west coast would be more expensive but it would suit you more. And American women seem to love English accents. Hell, I love English accents.



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#34
Quote by genghisgandhi
What?


Not all English accents are nice to listen to, especially that one.
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#36
Do not teach in the States, unless it's post-secondary. They pay their elementary/high-school teachers shit with shit benefits.

I see a few other people here with the same views lol
Last edited by Steel8909 at Mar 27, 2011,
#37
Quote by SlipknotRule93
Not all English accents are nice to listen to, especially that one.

It's something different though. A lot of American accents aren't very nice either. One of my teachers of from Boston and his accent pokes through occasionally.
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brot pls
#39
Quote by BladeSlinger
It's something different though. A lot of American accents aren't very nice either. One of my teachers of from Boston and his accent pokes through occasionally.



Well yeah I know. I'm just saying don't stereoytype the many accents we have over here as one thing

What you probably meant to say was the Hugh Grant accent, I'm guessing.
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#40
Stay in the UK and teach Sixth Form, or at a school with an attached Sixth Form so you'd be teaching mostly/partly over 16s. Stay here, the education system needs you.
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