#1
Hello, So I have a question about scales. How are scales supposed to played/practiced? I have been going through this guide http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/the_guide_to/the_ultimate_guide_to_guitar_chapter_ii_2_scales_-_diatonic_scales_in_practice.html

If I wanted to play the Ionion Position how should it be played? Do I play the notes on the 6th string first, followed by the notes on the 5th string etc...? And what do they mean when it says regular notes?
#2
scales are just a grouping of notes. what you practice are scale shapes. when practicing these shapes its important to remember where the notes are in relation to each other. these shapes can then be moved to change the key.
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#3
First of all: About those Greek "mode" names, forget those names for now, they're not used in proper context here. They're not just "shapes" of the major scale.

Basically you should know that if you play that set of notes, it's the major (or minor depending on which key you're in) scale. That's it. The patterns are nice to be familiar with, but what it really breaks down to is the fact that those notes are all part of a scale and you shouldn't compartmentalize the scale into 7 patterns.

Honestly, I don't think that's a very good lesson. Try this: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/the_crusade_part_2_intervals.html. And you'll use that knowledge by applying it to the major scale formula (1 2 3 4 5 6 7, or Root, Maj2, Maj3, P4, P5, Maj6, Maj7). Then, once you explore that for a bit, you might be able to alter it a bit. The natural minor scale flattens the 3 6 and 7, giving you 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7, or Root, Maj2, min3, P4, P5, min6, min7.

I'll leave it at that, that will give you plenty to work with.

Oh and as for how to practice: Try just building the scale on paper first, then applying those notes to the fretboard. Try making music out of it. It's all about applying this theory in real music, not just mind-numbing scale patterns and exercises. Not that those are bad, but they won't teach you how to really make music.
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Last edited by food1010 at Mar 27, 2011,
#5
Quote by Grimnak27
Yes, but what is the best way to practice those shapes?



the bets way imo is to just play around with the scales tyr imporvising riffs and just playing what you like in that scale

try improvising over a backing track
#6
Quote by Grimnak27
Yes, but what is the best way to practice those shapes?
Have a look at my edit, I addressed this.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#7
Hey Food1010 That guide you posted looks good, Can you give me the Link to the 1st part?


Edit: I found it.
Last edited by Grimnak27 at Mar 27, 2011,