#1
I've been playing bass for a couple years now with most of my background in blues and funk. Im really diggin the funk but i feel like my limited knowledge of theory and scales are holding me back. I play my funk on the pentatonic scale and I've already gotten to know the major/minor scale. When I jam i tend to keep my hand fixed on the first position (ex. i play the A pent. on the 5th fret and usually stay there). I dont know if i feel like I'm limited because the scale feels a certain way or because the position of said scale feels that way.

Is there any mode i should learn that you think has a particularly funkier feel than the other or that you prefer over others?
Or should I try a pentatonic scale at different positions before I go mode crazy.
Last edited by Rapt at Mar 28, 2011,
#2
Modes are always a great way to get out of a rut. Also try thinking about the actual notes not just the hand position. It'll allow you to move around the neck a lot easier giving a wider range.
Quote by bassmanjoe08
Dan

Don't stop being you <3


Quote by fatgoogle
I think after this relentless adding for the last 10 mins, that Dan is the coolest looking. Goddamn welsh people and my great etc etc etc etc etc granddad is welsh.
#3
Along with knowing what the actual notes as Dan has said, start practicing those scales in different ways. Play all the notes in the scale from the lowest note on your bass to the highest you can go. (on an A minor pentatonic, you would start with a low E on a 4 string bass). Play your scales in arpeggiated chords, or in broken thirds, fourths and fifths.
#4
Edit: skater dan0 & anarkee... well said

OP, I wont duplicate what they said... I'll go a diffrent direction.

"I bet I can name one scale you never practice. The Chromatic scale, It's the easiest and hardest. Chroma means color... if you want to add color to your playing, add the chromatic scale" ~ Victor Wooten/Anthony Wellington "the groove workshop".

I would suggest you check out this link. I've posted it before but I think it fits here as well. I have to agree with Carol Kaye that you will do your self a huge dis-service not learning to play "choral notes". I play alot of Blues, Jazz, Motown, Reggae... and this video helped to point me in the right direction. Niether is better or worst than the other. But I've noticed my playing really improving by playing more chord notes and using note scales as more of traveling notes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s9idtdWAAEA
Quote by MetlHed94



Well played, sir, well played.
Last edited by TheMooseKnuckle at Mar 28, 2011,
#5
Quote by TheMooseKnuckle
skater dan0 & skater dan0... well said


I know I'm great but you don't need to congratulate me twice.

On the subject of chromatics. I personally don't believe in chromatic scales as more than hand exercises. However the use of chromatic notes in your playing is a fantastic way to liven up stale basslines.
Quote by bassmanjoe08
Dan

Don't stop being you <3


Quote by fatgoogle
I think after this relentless adding for the last 10 mins, that Dan is the coolest looking. Goddamn welsh people and my great etc etc etc etc etc granddad is welsh.
#6
Quote by skater dan0
I know I'm great but you don't need to congratulate me twice.

On the subject of chromatics. I personally don't believe in chromatic scales as more than hand exercises. However the use of chromatic notes in your playing is a fantastic way to liven up stale basslines.


What can I say, it felt like the right thing to do at the time.

Once again copy and paste has betrayed me!!!
Quote by MetlHed94



Well played, sir, well played.
#7
Thanks a lot guy I'll definitely try and incorporate this into playing