#1
So recently i read an article from a website,tomhess.com, and it just briefly talks about when you should use a metronome to play and here is the article:

http://tomhess.net/PracticingGuitarWithAMetronome.aspx


Basically it has made me confused about how to practice the guitar effectively because some things that i practice with the metronome are quite funny. FOr example, for sweeps i will take a sweep and practice it note by note instead of groups and each click of the metronome i will play a note of the sweep. Is this considered wrong? i want to know the best way of practicing guitar besides the advice of playing things slow which i have done so. I really want to make the best out of practice sessions if possible so help would be greatly appreciated!
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#2
Best way I practiced sweeping, was not sweeping at all.
I was alternate picking the arpeggios with a metronome and gradually got faster.. 1BPM every ten mins or so. I'd probably have gone up 5BPM every day cz I wouldn't sit there for more than an hour practicing the same arpeggio.

The metronome is vital.. Don't move up a bpm until you can play cleanly.

Re-reading your post made me understand that you're not understanding note values. Every pulse of that metronome is a crotchet beat.. SO if it's 60BPM, you have 60 Crotchet notes a minute.. Most arpeggios are played with quavers or semi-quavers. If you're playing at quavers, you will have two notes a pulse and if you're playing at semi-quaver speed, you need to play four notes per pulse.
#3
Subdivide!

Basically..you'll still be playing note by note, but each beat will be subdivided into smaller groups of notes.
What you are doing now is playing quarter notes. One note per beat..and assuming we're talking 4/4 you'll have 4 beats to each bar.
By subdividing you can say you play 8th notes.
8th note is twice as fast as a quarter note. So for each beat you'd then play 2 notes.
If you want to go further you can play 16th notes, which will be 4 notes per beat (or click on your metronome).

Your method is technically fine, but it just makes more sense playing in 8th or 16th notes, since it's more likely that you'll be encountering those in actual music - and also, at quarter notes you'd have to play at a realllly high bpm in order to make sweeps sound like proper sweeps

There are more ways to divide up notes, but start off with this...and google the rest
#4
Quote by Shor
Subdivide!

Basically..you'll still be playing note by note, but each beat will be subdivided into smaller groups of notes.
What you are doing now is playing quarter notes. One note per beat..and assuming we're talking 4/4 you'll have 4 beats to each bar.
By subdividing you can say you play 8th notes.
8th note is twice as fast as a quarter note. So for each beat you'd then play 2 notes.
If you want to go further you can play 16th notes, which will be 4 notes per beat (or click on your metronome).

Your method is technically fine, but it just makes more sense playing in 8th or 16th notes, since it's more likely that you'll be encountering those in actual music - and also, at quarter notes you'd have to play at a realllly high bpm in order to make sweeps sound like proper sweeps

There are more ways to divide up notes, but start off with this...and google the rest


Yeah i understand what your talking about but the case whereby i was playing each note is because the tab i got has some really fast sweeps like 32th notes and the strong notes all fall in odd places so i just resorted to playing at a high bpm but only 1 note because right now im not that good at dividing even though i can read the music to some extent lol
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#5
Quote by jnsw
Yeah i understand what your talking about but the case whereby i was playing each note is because the tab i got has some really fast sweeps like 32th notes and the strong notes all fall in odd places so i just resorted to playing at a high bpm but only 1 note because right now im not that good at dividing even though i can read the music to some extent lol


Then my follow-up advise is...start with something simpler until you feel more comfortable with odd rhythms
#6
You can't practise everything the same way, there isn't just one way to practise. If you're starting sweeping then doing it very very slowly is good but you need to make sure your right hand is making on fluid motion as you speed it up.

Definitely start with something simple, a good idea is to write your own little sweeping exercises based off the shapes you're learning.
#8
Quote by Freepower
You can't practise everything the same way, there isn't just one way to practise. If you're starting sweeping then doing it very very slowly is good but you need to make sure your right hand is making on fluid motion as you speed it up.

Definitely start with something simple, a good idea is to write your own little sweeping exercises based off the shapes you're learning.


I couldn't agree anymore!

OP, I hate to break it to you, but there is no magic formula to make practice more efficient. No two people learn the same. I personally learn better from trial and error. So I jam with the radio, make a mistake and try to correct it next time. I can’t stand to sit there bored while forcing myself to study all day, I have to apply it while I learn it. Some people are like that others need to have a scheduled and need a specific list of things to work on. Neither is right or wrong just different learning styles.

With that being said… the only thing I have ever seen that holds true to most people regardless of their learning styles is to… practice without thinking about it. Watching TV is a great distraction… your ultimate goal is to be able to play without having to think about what you’re doing, right!? So practicing a technique or style while focusing on something else… it’s a means to that ultimate goal. works wonders for me, and most people I know!

If you want to listen to someone talk about keeping time. I would highly recommend checking out “Victor Wooten’s – Groove workshop”. Here is a clip of Victor Wooten doing a fun exercise to find and keep a beat. I would check it out, it’s damn impressive. You can take this bass lesson and several of his others from that DVD and apply it to sweeps or anything else you want.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uKPYiCgCpBU&playnext=1&list=PL1952B171B0A4BE98
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Well played, sir, well played.
#9
^ that said, it's no good practising certain things to the telly. If you're working on improving your technique it actually requires attention to your technique.

You can totally just grind gallops or whatever though.
#11
My advice for efficient practice is always this:

Practice in short chunks of 5-20 minutes, throughout the day, for as many sessions as you can, while rotating what you practice in each session. Meaning, this is the opposite of one long 10 hour practice session with no breaks. There are constant breaks.

Surprisingly, not only has this doubled the effectiveness, it's actually shortened my total time spent practicing. And there is actual scientific evidence for why this is the case. The best practice involves a lot of effort. Everytime you rotate to a new thing to practice, then come back, there is effort involved in playing that chord, lick, or riff. Because you "forgot" it after practicing something else. So now you have to "remember" it. Basically, it's this "forgetting and remembering" that causes the brain to really burn it in your muscle memory.
#12
I'm just referring to the technique advice in the article, so keep that in mind. Like these guys said, practice in a lot of different ways, feel it, and enjoy it.

His advice is something I'd definitely take to heart. I found out the hard way that the metronome has its flaws for improving technique.

Everyone learns differently so I can't speak for you, but for me putting away the metronome and just super concentrating on the right technique helped me out a lot. I first make sure the left and right hand are in perfect syncronization and concentrate on every movement being smooth and every note clean. Then I use the metronome to build the timing and some more muscle memory.

Also, this is difficult to explain but I will try. Intense concentration does not mean tightening up your body, gritting your teeth, and focusing only on the pick and left hand. Make sure you are keeping it loose. You have to feel it AND try to synch the right and left hand perfectly when practicing technique. Concentration and feeling it are not mutually exclusive. It's not one or the other, even though it seems like it at times. This part is hard to do. Good luck.