#1
Not an important question but I've always heard people say to limit around -.3/ 4ish DB rather than -.1.

Just wondering what the reason is.

Is it to give it just a tiny bit of space in case something alters it? Perhaps like if you were to get radio-play and it might bump it up just a little bit due to what they run it through?

or what?
#2
Quote by TechnicolorType

Is it to give it just a tiny bit of space in case something alters it?


Yes. If you limit, say, at -0.1, you could still get clipping. With -3 or so, you have a little headroom for those stray transients that get through.

Quote by TechnicolorType

Perhaps like if you were to get radio-play and it might bump it up just a little bit due to what they run it through?


Radio will slam the hell out of it anyways. Some producers do mixes specifically for radio where they back off on the compression a bit to take this into account. I've never bothered with that though.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#3
yeah I've heard about people doing a different mix for radios and whatnot.

but alright. thanks much for the answer. :]
#4
The other reason is that some mastering houses (i.e pressing plants, not just those doing the track mastering, which is technically 'pre-mastering') use gear that has advanced clipping detectors that might consider ___ number of consecutive samples hitting 0.1-0.0dBFS as clipping, because technically the wave would be if any more than two samples are consecutively at 0dBFS.
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