#1
Hey people,

here's my new lesson on how to record your guitar amp and getting a good tone recorded.
http://www.guitarhow.com/24_guitarhow_recording_your_guitar_amp.html

This comes from my personal experience in recording. I got better results each time in the studio but it's a neverending learning process.
How do you guys get a good guitar tone during recording, and are you always satisfied with the results?
Let me know,

Roger Axetrample
#3
Without a doubt, almost every rock artist these days is recording direct instead of the mic-in-front of cab method because it gives you the ability to record an ultra crisp, clean, gated tone, and I find that the best benefit of direct line-in recording is the fact that I can record at low volumes without driving my neighbors or my wife insane. Initially, I slapped my sm57 in front of my Vox 50watt cab and went for a balls-out, crank up the gain and volume to 10 experience because I had read where Zakk Wylde said that this was the best route to take. Then, I got to watching more and more videos from artists like Sevendust, Trivium, AVenged Sevenfold, etc. and they were doing direct, line-in style guitar tracking so I thought I'd try it. I will admit that it takes more fine-tuning and adjusting to get right (plus I record one take on the left channel and one on the right), but it is absolutely killer when you perfect it if you have decent equipment. A noise gate is a MUST! Fortunely, I have a gate built in to my Vox amp so I just go from my Vox line output to my Presonus Firestudio Project Firewire Interface and viola! Of course, there are multiple settings that need to be tinkered with inside the DAW, but once you get the feel for recording direct, it's amazing how much better it is than traditional cab micing. You can check out my sound quality at www.youtube.com/watch?v=JJxNDO_yXbo
#4
Quote by ragzy02
Without a doubt, almost every rock artist these days is recording direct instead of the mic-in-front of cab method because it gives you the ability to record an ultra crisp, clean, gated tone, and I find that the best benefit of direct line-in recording is the fact that I can record at low volumes without driving my neighbors or my wife insane. Initially, I slapped my sm57 in front of my Vox 50watt cab and went for a balls-out, crank up the gain and volume to 10 experience because I had read where Zakk Wylde said that this was the best route to take. Then, I got to watching more and more videos from artists like Sevendust, Trivium, AVenged Sevenfold, etc. and they were doing direct, line-in style guitar tracking so I thought I'd try it. I will admit that it takes more fine-tuning and adjusting to get right (plus I record one take on the left channel and one on the right), but it is absolutely killer when you perfect it if you have decent equipment. A noise gate is a MUST! Fortunely, I have a gate built in to my Vox amp so I just go from my Vox line output to my Presonus Firestudio Project Firewire Interface and viola! Of course, there are multiple settings that need to be tinkered with inside the DAW, but once you get the feel for recording direct, it's amazing how much better it is than traditional cab micing. You can check out my sound quality at www.youtube.com/watch?v=JJxNDO_yXbo

Just because a band records DI doesn't mean that the engineer isn't himself going to, or have someone else, reamp it later. In fact, I would be very surprised if any of those bands you mentioned did it any other way. Cab mic'ing is for sure the most common professional studio method for guitar recording.

Not trying to start a cab micing vs. pre-amp/amp sim debate. Both methods have their place and pros and cons. There's no best way.