#1
Hi there.

My names Matthew. I'm a 20 year old Journalism Student and I'm currently writing my dissertation. It's about music - Emo music to be exact.

I'm writing about how the "genre" (I don't really like using that word because I'm not convinced emo is a true genre) came to be (Rites of Spring/Embrace/Fugazi and then on through the decades) and how it's changed over the decades.

I come here on the recommendation of Duncang, as he says you folks are knowledgeable and may well be willing to help me out.

So, I was wondering if a few people with knowledge of the 'genre' could perhaps answer a few questions, such as:

1. What do you think emo is?
2. What does emo mean to you?
3. Why, in your opinion, does emo constantly receive the negative image that it has?

If anyone has any professional experience in the music/music journalism industry and could answer these questions as well I will be SO thankful.

1. Rites of Spring are most well known for "inventing" Emo-Core. Should they get all the credit?
2. How and why did Emotional Hardcore go from the rough sounding Rites of Spring era to the more pop-punky based sounding Sunny Day Real Estate etc?
3. Sunny Day Real Estate and Weezer are well known for 'legitimizing' the genre in the 90s, what was it about them that made them so popular at the time?

If a couple of people could just take a few minutes out of their day to answer me these few questions, I will be ever so grateful.

Cheers,

Matthew.

EDIT:
I like the answers I'm getting and hope for more.

I'd like to note that I, personally, also agree with emo being more about the fans than the music nowadays.

My dissertation is actually what's called a special exercise. It's 6,000 words in articles (I've got 4 articles) and 4,000 words on a topic related to both journalism and my topic. My topic was "Does journalism have an affect on the general publics views on cultures and lifestyles" (Or something, I've written the essay but I am yet to word the title in a way I like) so in that I wrote about how the emo life style/music is vilified in the news, as well as the lower class culture/chav culture.

And also, I understand Weezer weren't a great example, they were just the first that sprung to mind and in my research their name ALWAYS closely followed after SDRE, haha.
Last edited by brunners at Mar 29, 2011,
#2
"Emo", just like "pop", is a label that changes application constantly over time. What is considered emo today is very different than what was considered twenty or ten years ago, and is most likely different from what will be considered emo ten or twenty years from now. "Emo" music, though always falling somewhere under the umbrella of punk or metal, can never be quite nailed down to one specific genre; rather, bands hailing from the punk or metal or alt. rock scenes are commandeered and assimilated by the "Emo" scene. In all honesty, I find that "Emo" is better applied to the fans themselves rather than the bands.
#3
Quote by PUNKinheadedboy
"Emo", just like "pop", is a label that changes application constantly over time. What is considered emo today is very different than what was considered twenty or ten years ago, and is most likely different from what will be considered emo ten or twenty years from now. "Emo" music, though always falling somewhere under the umbrella of punk or metal, can never be quite nailed down to one specific genre; rather, bands hailing from the punk or metal or alt. rock scenes are commandeered and assimilated by the "Emo" scene. In all honesty, I find that "Emo" is better applied to the fans themselves rather than the bands.

1,000% this.
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#4
I wrote an essay on the genre and how it came about, so I can kinda help on that end. It wasn't a dissertation or anything, but I guess if you have to produce that much information you'll take whatever input you can get, right?

Rites of Spring deserve a LOT of credit. The term "emo" was coined at a Rites show. So yes, in that respect they did pretty much invent it. Embrace played a pretty vital role as well.

The thing about Emo is that it's not really a definitive sound (nowadays the whole "twinkly" emo sound sort of is I guess), it's more of an attitude. Early emo(tive hardcore) is essentially what happens when you take the hardcore of the day (Gorilla Biscuits, Minor Threat etc), make it more melodic, add personal, reflective lyrics and scream them at the top of your lungs like you're about to cry. Obviously there's more to it than that, but that's pretty much how it came about and what emocore/emotive hardcore etc means to me (and anyone else I guess). I wouldn't say you should credit Rites of Spring exclusively (Guy Picciotto is definitely a name you'll have to drop many times though, along with Ian MacKaye). The whole Revolution Summer movement is definitely the place to start though.

It didn't so much develop into the likes of Sunny Day Real Estate as they developed into it. They're a pop punk / rock sounding band who added emo influence and came out like some sort of hybrid. It's pretty hard to find a direct route from Embrace to Weezer (on the topic of Weezer, they aren't the best example as they only have 1 album that can really be considered emo. Everything other than Pinkerton is primarily pop rock). So I think that's a pretty hard question to answer, and probably a tough topic to write on.

The reason the likes of SDRE and Weezer got big is that they played catchy, accessable music that was still angsty and not the kind of stuff kids' parents listened to. Same as how the likes of Fall Out Boy get big nowadays (I'm not saying they're an emo band).

In regards to your question about negative image: emo doesn't reviece a negative image. It is (like many other genres of it's sort - hardcore, pop punk, screamo, metalcore etc) a bastardised term. There are a few styles that fall under the bracket of emo - the whole "revolution summer" style, pop and pop punk influenced emo (the likes of SDRE, Jimmy Eat Worlds etc), "indiemo"/twinkly emo/Kinsella style emo (American Football, Cap'n Jazz, Algernon Cadwallader etc) and so on. Then there's the hundreds of pop rock or pop punk bands with angsty lyrics who look a bit funny and thusly become falsely branded as emo (Fall Out Boy, Panic! At The Disco etc). This is a real shame, as it doesn't do those bands OR actual emo any favours. Either way, it's those bands who have a bad reputation and get abuse. Because of their scene kid fanbase mainly. I find that anyone who knows what tr00 emo is generally enjoys it. Same with screamo, metalcore, hardcore etc.

I probably sound patronising and whatnot, but I'm not trying to. You probably know all this stuff already if you're writing a dissertation on emo, but whatever. Hope I was useful in some way.

EDIT: Holy shit I wrote loads.
My name is Danny. Call me that.
#5
I'll try to answer those three main questions the best I can.

To me, emo is a very stupid genre label. I think that once upon a time it was used to describe a small group of similar sounding bands, over time more and more bands of varying styles and sounds have come to be placed under the "emo umbrella". I think now days, people choose to label a band as "emo" based primarily on the lyrics.

You can find bands that play soft rock who are called emo and bands who play more of a pop punk style called emo. Obviously from a sonic/composition stand point those two genres are not very similar which is why I don't like people calling both emo. This same thing is happening with the term "indie" a lot now which I also find very stupid.

I think emo has a bad image mainly because the majority of music listeners are ignorant and indifferent about music. I think it's ironic that they would call X band emo as if it's a negative thing, while listening to some depressing country song and not think it has the same emotional qualities in the song writing.

I think a lot of more mainstream music listeners have just sort of seen this image of an "emo" fan being a stupid depressed teenager, wearing make up, skinny jeans, ect. and decided that any music they don't like they're going to make fun by calling "emo". Sort of like people started using the words gay and fag as an insult to just about anyone they don't like. To the average music listener calling something emo, is much like one normal heterosexual man calling another gay.

I think it's generally a bad thing because as a result people tend to form an opinion about a band prematurely. Also, as I said I think it's extremely ironic that people who are listening to "break up" songs in genres like pop, R&B, or country would somehow think a rock song with similar lyrical qualities is some sissy, cry yourself to sleep emo song, and therefor will ridicule a band that they've never even really listened to.
#6
I just wanted to add how emo broke in two from the Revolution Summer/Dischord bands in the 90's. One one hand, it became much more pop orientated, more melodic and accessible, ie Sunny Day Real Estate, Capn Jazz etc...
On the other, it took the hardcore influences further into the first wave of screamo. Notably the Gravity records roster, Heroin, Antioch Arrow, Mohinder, Clikitat Ikatowi and Angel Hair pushed the sound into a harsher place altogether. Eventually this sound birthed groups like the Locust and (I guess) Blood Brothers among others, who had a large impact on the "emo" kids of their respective eras.
It could be argued that either sound is responsible for the superaturation of emo in the distorted way it is known today. Perhaps the poppier side allowed the term to be applied to more socially acceptable music, of a wider definition sonically, while screamo paved the way for "scene core", harsh punk-derived music aesthetically repackaged for the vast crowd of metal fans, to maximise it's use as a marketing term.

Sorry I didnt answer your questions, I'll come back later.
#7
Ha I didn't bother going into screamo because I would just talk and talk and talk.
My name is Danny. Call me that.
#8
1. What do you think emo is?

Emo is a style of music, created in the 80s (even though the people hated that term). In the 90s it changed, gained different, softer influences, and gained some popularity. Then in the 00s it became its own monster.

2. What does emo mean to you?

Emo is probably my favorite genre of music. It represents my personal music change from trying to be punk, and accepting all different kinds of music.

3. Why, in your opinion, does emo constantly receive the negative image that it has?

I think emo has always had a negative connotation, at least musically. I don't think anybody has ever embraced (lol) the term or the music. I think the Revolution Summer people considered themselves punk. 90s era might have embraced it (I'm kind of hazy on that). And then bands like My Chemical Romance tried to lose the term.

I think the negative image comes from the fans, especially recently. It's hard to like "emo kids" because of trend hopping and the cutting stereotype. Side note, I think the cutting thing is bullshit. I mean, obviously there are people who self harm, but I don't think that when emo was popular (I think it's died out now, like we all knew it would) there was the kids who self harmed just to fit in.

I lost my train of thought.

Oh yeah. The funniest, at least to me, part of emo in modern culture is that nobody can agree on what it is. There was the first stereotype of the swoop haircut, but then as it got more popular nobody could agree what it was. Goth kids got called emo. And so did the kids wearing tripp pants.


1. Rites of Spring are most well known for "inventing" Emo-Core. Should they get all the credit?

No because there were a lot bands that emerged in that time.

2. How and why did Emotional Hardcore go from the rough sounding Rites of Spring era to the more pop-punky based sounding Sunny Day Real Estate etc?

If I remember correctly, SDRE had a more aggressive sound until Jeremy Enigk took over on vocals. I think it was the next generation of bands playing. Revolution Summer had died down, and people who where in the crowd then started bands and brought their own influences there.

Also, according to Nothing Feels Good, the Smiths were really popular with the people in the emo scene. So maybe they bought that sound into their music more.

I also wouldn't say that SDRE had a pop punk sound.

3. Sunny Day Real Estate and Weezer are well known for 'legitimizing' the genre in the 90s, what was it about them that made them so popular at the time?

Well Weezer got popular for a "non-emo" sound, but Pinkerton almost killed their careers. And SDRE were never really that popular. But I think those bands took something that was almost purely in DC and took it across the country.

Side note, I don't really consider Pinkerton an emo album.
*-)
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#9
I wrote a short genre description for emo on another site. I think it's applicable.

"Emo, short for emotional hardcore (or emotive hardcore) originated in the mid 1980s as a sub-genre of hardcore, generally characterized by the more emotional and personal nature of the lyrics that took precedence over the more community driven lyrics and concepts that were dominating the scene at the time. The first emo band is usually cited as Rites Of Spring who formed in 1984 in Washington DC. In 1985 Ian Mackaye of Minor Threat formed the band Embrace which spurred further attention to the young genre and sparked what was called the Revolution Summer of '85 in which current members of the DC hardcore community started bands that purposefully tried to propel what they deemed to be the more creative genre, these bands included, Beefeater, Gray Matter, and Dag Nasty to name a few. In the late 80's and early 90's bands started crossing emo with a more indie aesthetic and bands like Sunny Day Real Estate and Jawbreaker were born. With the success of bands like Jawbreaker and the success of a lot of the 90's pop punk bands emo hit a sort of second wave in the 90's with bands like Braid, Mineral, and Jimmy Eat World. While these bands were generally more pop oriented, at the same time the scene had a rift of bands that wanted to veer away from the pop oriented music, with bands like Angel Hair, Heroin and Portraits of the Past. The harsher, less accessible genre was coined screamo. In the late 90's early 2000's (which seems to be the bastardization period of a lot of music IMO) the genre had started getting more and more mainstream attention and big record labels tried scooping up all sorts of bands they thought they could market as emo. In the early and mid 2000's emo became mostly a fashion statement with pop rock bands like My Chemical Romance and Fall Out Boy grievously getting tagged as the genre, and just a general poor misconception of what emo music was by the general populace."
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#10
1. What do you think emo is?

Emo is a kind of music that was basically a slower, more personal offshoot of DC hardcore. Obviously an oversimplification, but you get it. In the style of Rites of Spring, Embrace, Embrace, etc.. Then, Jawbreaker and Sunny Day Real Estate basically took their pop/college rock sensibilities and injected them into emo music. These bands basically started a new direction of more poppy emo bands like Jimmy Eat World.

2. What does emo mean to you?

Punk that is very in touch with it's 'feminine' emotions . It's one of my favorite genres, probably my favorite after pop punk, and many of my favorite bands are emo or greatly influenced by the genre (Jawbreaker, The Promise ring).

3. Why, in your opinion, does emo constantly receive the negative image that it has?

The media, brah. It was an easy word to attach to bands like My Chemical Romance and any other number of bands who sported black attire, skinny jeans, and eyeliner. They really ruined the word. I feel dirty when people ask me what genre Jawbreaker is.
Last edited by due 07 at Mar 29, 2011,
#11
What do you think emo is?
Music/lyrics that deals with personal feelings and emotions, to put it simply. That's the one thing most bands who have that label attached to them have in common.

What does emo mean to you?
Punk music with lyrics that often deal with very personal subjects.

Why, in your opinion, does emo constantly receive the negative image that it has?
In the 80's and 90's, because the bands didn't feel like it was an accurate term to describe the music. In the 00's, because of the media's image of depressed, suicidal kids who cut themselves.

Rites of Spring are most well known for "inventing" Emo-Core. Should they get all the credit?
Really all they did was be the first band to have the word applied to them They didn't really have any influence on any "emo" bands outside of DC, until recent years. Jawbreaker and SDRE deserve way more credit than them in terms of developing the genre. There were tons of other bands in the DC scene during the late 80's like Embrace, Dag Nasty, Ignition, One Last Wish, Marginal Man, Soulside, Beefeater, and others. None of these bands (besides Embrace) ever get much credit for creating emo. RoS just happened to be the first band to have the term applied to. Mind you, they did change the DC scene drastically from it's hardcore roots to a more broad, experimental sound. But other than that, nope.

How and why did Emotional Hardcore go from the rough sounding Rites of Spring era to the more pop-punky based sounding Sunny Day Real Estate etc?
Again, I don't think these bands have any affiliation with each other. Each had their sound, and the term just happened to be used to describe both of them.

Sunny Day Real Estate and Weezer are well known for 'legitimizing' the genre in the 90s, what was it about them that made them so popular at the time?Accesibility. The 90's were a big time for alt. bands, and they brought a sound that could be accepted as being alternative, but still mainstream enough to get mainstream attention.
#13
Whilst not strictly related to the TS' question, how did the Midwest emo scene become associated with emo as a whole? I mean, I hear the Slint influence, I hear the hardcore influence but not so much the 80s material. Was there an actual connection or was it just by association?
#14
Quote by due 07
Also, TS, don't listen to the first two posts in the thread.

This.
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#15
There are some silly posts in this thread. There's some very good ones as well, but most of the non-regs posts are confusing/wrong.
Quote by emoboy027
Is fingering an emo chick that likes yoy and that has fallen in love with you is it wrong to you to finger her during lunch outside in front of everyone at the high school? would you not care or lol even wish it was you?

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#16
Quote by due 07
Also, TS, don't listen to the first two posts in the thread.


I don't know why you guys are hating on the first post so much... The last line about emo being applied more to the fans than the bands is pretty good.

I know most of you see emo as it originally was used, but now days the words all but disassociated from that. The typical kids you'd hear people call emo probably listen to shit like MCR and BMTH, and have never even heard of most of the bands labeled as emo before 2000.


Basically, the people who think of emo as SDR or ROS are a very small minority. Most casual music listeners think of emo as skinny jeans, make up, and MCR. Sort of the point of my original post simplified. Also I think the more ignorant people are about music the more loosely they apply the term. I know a lot of people who basically exclusively listen to Hot 100 radio and would call just about any modern rock emo.
#17
Quote by KurdtStaley
I don't know why you guys are hating on the first post so much... The last line about emo being applied more to the fans than the bands is pretty good.

I know most of you see emo as it originally was used, but now days the words all but disassociated from that. The typical kids you'd hear people call emo probably listen to shit like MCR and BMTH, and have never even heard of most of the bands labeled as emo before 2000.


Basically, the people who think of emo as SDR or ROS are a very small minority. Most casual music listeners think of emo as skinny jeans, make up, and MCR. Sort of the point of my original post simplified. Also I think the more ignorant people are about music the more loosely they apply the term. I know a lot of people who basically exclusively listen to Hot 100 radio and would call just about any modern rock emo.

That's the only comment hating on the first post.

And the point is that you can't be "emo". Like saying "oh look, there's some emos standing outside Hot Topic" is a misuse of the term. The correct term would be "scene kids". It would be like saying "oh look, there's some metals".
My name is Danny. Call me that.
#18
Quote by asator
That's the only comment hating on the first post.

And the point is that you can't be "emo". Like saying "oh look, there's some emos standing outside Hot Topic" is a misuse of the term. The correct term would be "scene kids". It would be like saying "oh look, there's some metals".


Alright, I agree that is a misuse of the term, but the use and meaning of words change over time. Today, the term is more commonly used to make fun of kids with skinny jeans than to describe bands, at least by my peers here in Oregon.
#19
Quote by KurdtStaley
Alright, I agree that is a misuse of the term, but the use and meaning of words change over time. Today, the term is more commonly used to make fun of kids with skinny jeans than to describe bands, at least by my peers here in Oregon.


That's what it is commonly used as, by a bunch of people who are wrong. TS is writing a dissertation about Emo music. I don't think he wants a bunch of misinformation from people who don't know what they are talking about.
I'm an asshole.
#20
1. What do you think emo is?
Emo is a confusing and overwhelmingly misunderstood genre label that was first applied to Rites of Spring in the mid eighties, and expanded heavily in the nineties to include a loosely defined subgenre of indie rock. The term "emo" became a household word in the early 2000s in reference to such a wide range of bands, sounds, and attitudes, that I'm not really sure how that happened. Emo is currently seeing a resurgence in the DIY punk and indie scene among members of a younger generation who relate to the original definitions of the genre and seek to breathe new life into the music that moves them.

2. What does emo mean to you?
To me personally, emo music represents my desire to grow as a person, and my drive to expand as a musician and a writer.

3. Why, in your opinion, does emo constantly receive the negative image that it has?
I think a few other replies covered this question better than I can.

1. Rites of Spring are most well known for "inventing" Emo-Core. Should they get all the credit?
They deserve a lot of credit for adding to the pool of sounds that are now thrown under the post-hardcore umbrella, and they were the first band to have the term "emo" applied to them; however, I don't think they should be looked at as revolutionaries when the scene they belonged to already had a general attitude of experimentation beyond the boundaries of punk and hardcore. To credit Rites of Spring without mention of Gray Matter, Beefeater, the Nation of Ulysses, and other bands of that era would be incorrect.

2. How and why did Emotional Hardcore go from the rough sounding Rites of Spring era to the more pop-punky based sounding Sunny Day Real Estate etc?
This is where I get particularly fascinated. This is also where I insert my opinion and make some assumptions based on interviews I've read and music I like - so if anyone finds anything incorrect about my statements, please tell me.
The initial transformation of emo occurred in the early nineties, when screamo came to life as a much more underground and significantly more extreme subgenre, and "emo" became disassociated from the hardcore scene when it fused with indie rock.
From what I've gathered, indie-emo started with Fugazi's Repeater album. Repeater laid the blueprint (lol) for the style of hardcore-influenced alternative rock that makes up one of the earliest definitions of "post-hardcore." It seems the first indie-emo bands, particularly Christie Front Drive, Sunny Day Real Estate, and Boys' Life, were following in Fugazi's footsteps by simply being hardcore dudes who wanted to play something different.
It gets especially convoluted in the mid-nineties when the next wave of "emo" bands starts appearing - much softer, more alternative-influenced acts like the Promise Ring and Texas is the Reason, who had a distinct lineage to earlier hardcore bands, and Mineral, who didn't. This is my favorite generation of emo, but also the one that first began to face pressure from the media and from their peers to adhere to the label, and consequently, the first generation to widely disown the term for their own artistic freedom. Texas is the Reason broke up under the pressure of major record labels who thought emo could be the next big trend; Mineral struggled with the term as well, and I would argue that the stylistic change they took on their second LP was partly an effort to distance themselves from emo. I found this interview with Chris Simpson to be particularly interesting, because he touches on this discussion and mentions that he wasn't even aware of the term "emo" until well into Mineral's career. I think many of Mineral's peers simply considered themselves to be alternative rock bands. (even Jawbreaker chose to use that ambiguous label rather than "punk" "emo" or "hardcore")

3. Sunny Day Real Estate and Weezer are well known for 'legitimizing' the genre in the 90s, what was it about them that made them so popular at the time?
I think both bands just came around in the right place at the right time. Weezer has more to do with pop punk than emo. Sunny Day Real Estate, however, was an alternative rock band from Seattle who released an album on Sub Pop in the wake of the quickly dying grunge movement. Also, note that SDRE received little commercial success even at the time; they were critically acclaimed and are widely respected now for their lasting influence, but their mainstream popularity at their peak probably didn't far exceed that of Jawbreaker, Samiam, or any other vaguely-emo-or-punk bands who made their way to MTV in 1994.
I'm the type of nigga that's built to last
If you fuck with me, I'll put my foot in your ass
See, I don't give a fuck cause I keep bailin
Yo, what the fuck are they yellin?!


GANGSTA, GANGSTA
Last edited by JesusOfSbrbia at Mar 30, 2011,
#21
It should also be noted that the underground screamo bands of the 90s had a much more direct connection to 80s emo-core, but a lot of the users here know WAY more about that stuff than I do.
I'm the type of nigga that's built to last
If you fuck with me, I'll put my foot in your ass
See, I don't give a fuck cause I keep bailin
Yo, what the fuck are they yellin?!


GANGSTA, GANGSTA
#22
Quote by lookpizza
That's what it is commonly used as, by a bunch of people who are wrong. TS is writing a dissertation about Emo music. I don't think he wants a bunch of misinformation from people who don't know what they are talking about.


You're an idiot pizza, he had several questions about the ambiguity of the term; what does it mean to you, why does it have a stigma ect. You're not unique in your ability to read a wikipedia article on the history of the term "emo".
#23
Quote by KurdtStaley
You're an idiot pizza, he had several questions about the ambiguity of the term; what does it mean to you, why does it have a stigma ect. You're not unique in your ability to read a wikipedia article on the history of the term "emo".


The fact is that 'emo' means something. Then the media misused it hard and kids picked up on that. That doesn't make it less wrong. You were implying that if everyone is wrong about something, then it is right. That is retarded logic.

I'll give you an example, based on your username, it will be relevant to your interests. Kids at my school call Bush and Seether 'grunge'. So that must mean they play grunge music, right?
Last edited by due 07 at Apr 1, 2011,
#24
I don't care because they're just stupid genre labels. And I disagree with the basic concept of being wrong or right about how it's applied. This isn't a math problem, it's subjective.

I understand the desire for fans of bands like ROS to not be associated with fans of bands like MCR, so do yourself a favor and just don't call it emo. You can be "right" but no one cares. When you tell someone ROS is emo, they think "Oh, so they're like a worse MCR?". You just sound petty and self righteous insisting that the common use of the word is wrong.
#25
Quote by KurdtStaley
I don't care because they're just stupid genre labels. And I disagree with the basic concept of being wrong or right about how it's applied. This isn't a math problem, it's subjective.

So you wouldnt mind people call Bush and Seether 'grunge'?

music is subjective in some sort ie. taste, but as far as definition goes emo had a clear definition but that was screwed up by the media
#26
For one I hardly listen to "grunge" anymore, so I couldn't careless who people think is grunge. Secondly, I think the whole label was totally stupid to begin with. It was made purely for marketing, so people could say "hey you like Nirvana, yeah you should check out these other grunge bands".

emo had a clear definition (also a useless word made for marketing), now it's an ambiguous stigmatic label. Sure you could say the media screwed it up, but it doesn't matter anymore, because the meaning and use of words change based on how people choose to use them. The meaning and use of 'emo' has changed, therefor the new use isn't "wrong" it's simply a different use of the word. You can find plenty of examples of this throughout the history of the english language. No one is going to throw a fit about someone saying "what's up" as an informal greeting, you shouldn't either.
#27
What genre a band is in is not subjective. That is possibly the most idiotic thing I've read all week. the only subjective thing in music is whether or not you like it.

And to my knowledge, 'emo' wasn't a word made up for marketing, because quite frankly there was no use marketing it. I think some dude yelled out from the crowd at an RoS or Embrace show and said "you guys are emo-core" or something to that effect.
#28
I remember the last time Kurdt disagreed with me. He ended up looking stupid and apologizing and then adding me as a friend.
I'm an asshole.
#29
Quote by lookpizza
I remember the last time Kurdt disagreed with me. He ended up looking stupid and apologizing and then adding me as a friend.

This. Same argument, probably. Seems like a good dude overall though.
My name is Danny. Call me that.
#30
Quote by asator
This. Same argument, probably. Seems like a good dude overall though.

Basically. Right mindset just wrong opinions. The definition of emo only changes when you have the wrong definition.
I'm an asshole.
#31
This sucks now.
I'm the type of nigga that's built to last
If you fuck with me, I'll put my foot in your ass
See, I don't give a fuck cause I keep bailin
Yo, what the fuck are they yellin?!


GANGSTA, GANGSTA
#32
emo is definitely a genre, dude. it began as a genre and was turned into a terrible scene of eighth grade kids that wear eye liner and skinny jeans.
#33
Quote by yerpskyerp
emo is definitely a genre, dude. it began as a genre and was turned into a terrible scene of eighth grade kids that wear eye liner and skinny jeans.

No it wasn't.
Quote by emoboy027
Is fingering an emo chick that likes yoy and that has fallen in love with you is it wrong to you to finger her during lunch outside in front of everyone at the high school? would you not care or lol even wish it was you?

Youztoobz
MIDI Magicalness!
#34
Yeah I feel like Emo kept on developing while the eye liner types stole the word. Not the genre. There are plenty of modern emo bands who developed without going all scene. Like...y'know...yours.

If anything I'd say the word was turned into that.
My name is Danny. Call me that.
#36
^ I like that.
I'm the type of nigga that's built to last
If you fuck with me, I'll put my foot in your ass
See, I don't give a fuck cause I keep bailin
Yo, what the fuck are they yellin?!


GANGSTA, GANGSTA