#1
A bit of background info so you understand where I'm coming from/what my goals are:

I started guitar about 6 years ago, played for a year about 4 hours a day. At this point in time I saw the instrument not as a musical device, but as a technical device that I wanted to get good at (I won't lie, mostly to impress people). After about a year I wound up with some great technical abilities (for someone who's played a year...) but absolutely no means of expressing myself musically, none whatsoever. I soon got too frustrated because I basically knew nothing about guitar/music and I quit playing altogether.

Now: I started playing again last year around this time, this time just for fun. Slowly but surely I started picking up theory as this time around I was doing it for the musical aspect rather than the technical aspect.

So here I am, I'm now loving guitar again, but this time I want to build a solid musical foundation so that I can unlock the fretboard and THEN I'll start focussing more on the technical side of playing once I've got a grip on (applying) basic music theory.

With this in mind, any suggestions/comments about this rough schedule?

Monday-Friday
Intervals:
-15 min intervals (as in figuring out various positions of them etc)
-5 min intervals with notes
-15 min interval improv (arpeggiating etc...)
Major/Minor Scales:
-10 min scale runs with notes
-10 min scale runs
-10 min minor improv
-10 min relative major improv
Pentatonic Major/Minor Scales:
-10 min scale runs with notes
-15 min scale runs (still don't fully have the patterns down yet)
-15 min minor/major improv

I don't know the notes on the fretboard yet very well, it takes about 2-4 seconds when I land on a note before I can name it and I want this to become almost instant, so "with notes" just means that each note played will be stopped on until I can name it and then I'll move onto the next.

I want to learn intervals so that I can arpeggiate things without needing to know countless patterns, and so that I can better keep up with chord changes and what not.

Thoughts?
#2
Quote by -TM-
A bit of background info so you understand where I'm coming from/what my goals are:

I started guitar about 6 years ago, played for a year about 4 hours a day. At this point in time I saw the instrument not as a musical device, but as a technical device that I wanted to get good at (I won't lie, mostly to impress people). After about a year I wound up with some great technical abilities (for someone who's played a year...) but absolutely no means of expressing myself musically, none whatsoever. I soon got too frustrated because I basically knew nothing about guitar/music and I quit playing altogether.

Now: I started playing again last year around this time, this time just for fun. Slowly but surely I started picking up theory as this time around I was doing it for the musical aspect rather than the technical aspect.

So here I am, I'm now loving guitar again, but this time I want to build a solid musical foundation so that I can unlock the fretboard and THEN I'll start focussing more on the technical side of playing once I've got a grip on (applying) basic music theory.

With this in mind, any suggestions/comments about this rough schedule?

Monday-Friday
Intervals:
-15 min intervals (as in figuring out various positions of them etc)
-5 min intervals with notes
-15 min interval improv (arpeggiating etc...)
Major/Minor Scales:
-10 min scale runs with notes
-10 min scale runs
-10 min minor improv
-10 min relative major improv
Pentatonic Major/Minor Scales:
-10 min scale runs with notes
-15 min scale runs (still don't fully have the patterns down yet)
-15 min minor/major improv

I don't know the notes on the fretboard yet very well, it takes about 2-4 seconds when I land on a note before I can name it and I want this to become almost instant, so "with notes" just means that each note played will be stopped on until I can name it and then I'll move onto the next.

I want to learn intervals so that I can arpeggiate things without needing to know countless patterns, and so that I can better keep up with chord changes and what not.

Thoughts?


If the goal is to be more musical, then the practice routine should include the playing of music. Obvious I know, but your routine seems to disregard it.

What you have is very mechanical. If you practice that way, you'll play that way.
shred is gaudy music
#3
Quote by GuitarMunky
If the goal is to be more musical, then the practice routine should include the playing of music. Obvious I know, but your routine seems to disregard it.

What you have is very mechanical. If you practice that way, you'll play that way.


Exactly what I was thinking. If you don't regard the repetition of scales a "technical" exercise, what do you regard it as?

How many full songs can you play off the top of your head? What's your experience with chords?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#4
Quote by AlanHB
Exactly what I was thinking. If you don't regard the repetition of scales a "technical" exercise, what do you regard it as?

How many full songs can you play off the top of your head? What's your experience with chords?

Well 50% of it is "guided improv" -- I would consider that musical.

The repetition of scales is because I haven't mastered them yet, I don't yet know all the shapes so until I do I need to drill them a bit.


Note that this routine isn't the "be all, end all" of my playing, I usually learn other songs/jam for fun quite a bit, and during the summer I'll be jamming with friends all the time.

I can play quite a few songs and I have a pretty good repertoire(sp) of chords, I could use more though for sure, but I'll probably just get a chords chart book or something this summer, as for now I can just make a chord if I need to and I already know various forms of most chords I'd need to use anyways.

The goal of this routine is to provide a solid base: i.e., learn and master the notes on the fretboard, learn/master intervals, learn/master major/minor/pentatonic scales, and get better at improv.
#5
Before I comment, I want to share a couple of thoughts.

When I look at something I judge things, frankly by time...how much time will it take to hit this objective...? And is there a better way that will hit the same objective and allow one to then go out and apply it to their playing, while understanding what it is they are playing.

You're schedule while ambitious, and honestly if you wanna go for it, more power to you, I hope it works out for you...

But to me, that's wayyyyy overkill

This is going to sound like a slanted and biased perspective, because what I am going to share is the way that I teach it.

First thing, definitely learn the notes on the Neck, how do you apply what you learn if its taking you a long time to learn the notes or find them?

Second, I teach you how to play all over the fretboard in any key, major or minor, intorduction to improvisation. No Box scales or caged system in use here

Third Chords, you'd learn to quickly come up with all the notes in any chord in the world, and knowing this, allows me to not have to use patterns...and why? Because in real time the note I know and can find on the guitar means that I can set it up how I want. If I want to sweep an Em9 I simply choose where I want to play that D and F# note after my triad. What more do I need to think about?

Let me put it this way....

How many times a day do you have to go review your alphabet so you can write something.

If you are like me you havent had to review the order of letters in the alphabet for a long long time....

Why? Because, at some point we used it enough that we simply can write and communicate how we feel what we think, in real time. The same thing with the guitar and chords and notes and scales. At some point the end game is to be aware of these, but not to think about them.

My point is that if I can make someone know these faster then I can get straight helping them make USE of these, ergo, the more time they spend USING and applying things, the fast they tap into their own musical voice, and they are simply playing and responding with their music. Does that make sense?

What's your endgame?

Because, frankly, (and I swear that this isnt a sales pitch), but if you put that amount of time into what I teach, and gave you to learn, as you seem to be ready to do in this "practice plan" of yours, in a couple of months you'd progress so far, AND know all the things I listed in my 3 points above, that you'd need NEW goals to go after!

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Mar 30, 2011,
#6
god, how would you not go insane doing that?

segment your practice into four blocks of time (more if your willing to put in more time, these can be between 15 minutes and an hour in duration)

first block: review the day before
second block: playing music by ear and improvising
third block: technique (1 or 2 specific goals each week), scales, arpeggios etc.
fourth block: repetoire.

set small, realistic goals and as you get through what you wanted to, find more stuff to learn, don't try to do everything in one day, but try to get something new done each day.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#7
yeah i suggest playing music by ear and improvisation