#1
What are some techniques/licks/things that you tend to do when you improvise? Apologize in advance if this has been done before. Lets get some idea's flowing for other guitarists.

Examples:

I tend to go back and forth between two strings with the same fingerings. Such as:

E||--------------------------| 
B||--------------------------| 
G||--10--10--10--------------| 
D||-9---9---9----------------| 
A||--------------------------| 
E||--------------------------|

I also tend to try making a chord out of the scale I am using. A Minor pentatonic example:

E||--5---------3-------------| 
B||--8---------5-------------| 
G||--7---or----2-------------| 
D||--5-----------------------| 
A||--------------------------| 
E||--------------------------|


Please give us your techniques!
#2
something like dududdooo dudu du doddoo
Schecter C1 Classic
Fender Vintage -57 Ri Stratocaster
Fender Blues JR w/ 12"Cannabis Rex
Mad Professor Sky Blue OD
Wampler Ego Compressor
TC Electronics Stereo Chorus/Flanger
#3
I tend to do strings of pull-offs, usually triplets. Say I'm playing in G, I'd pull off from the third, and then jump up or down an octave and repeat it. I think it adds a bit of flavour to the licks, but... who knows. I also tend to add in a whammy bar stunt or two at the end of a speed run, or if I'm resolving a chord, I'll try to add a tapped harmonic over it.
#4
hammer ons pull offs, mostly, or ill do a tapp that il just make up on the spot, as well as a couple improved licks, ill start slow build a melody then play it fast.
GEARZ

Schecter Hellraiser
TS 808 modded tubescreamer
MXR six band EQ
boss DD-3 digital delay
Boss CE-5 Chorus Ensemble
ISP Decimator
1998 Marshall JCM2000 DSL 100
Avatar 4x12
#5
i tap alot probably more than i should

also

e-------7h8p7------------------
b---8------------8-7----
g9-----------------------
d-----------------
i usually find myself eventually playing this whe im improvising
#6
Hammer-ons, pull-offs, tapping, maidenesque triplets, tremolo picking, and even some sweep picking if I'm pretty familiar with the scale. A combination of that and it never gets boring.
#7
Lots of pinch harmonics. I tend to stick to the minor penatonic, but I do the minor scale and some different modes depending on how I am feeling. I Like to do fast hammer ons with my first 3 fingers, and go back and forth on the a and d while palm muting on and off. I have a few arppegios riffs that I manipulate as well.
Quote by AgentWiggles
Thanks, douche.


Quote by SlayingDragons
Dude...



Gear:
Ibanez SZ 520QM
Ibanez RG 450DXB
Fender Big Apple Stratocaster
Pod XT Live
Peavey XXX Half Stack
Peavey Bandit 112
and a soul of Rock n' Roll
#8
I always overuse the major pentatonic scales... and my improvisation is always bluesy and or boring.

It's not that I don't know other scales, Because I DO.. it's just engrained into my playing to use major pentatonic, and I hate it.


Quote by Saint78
Jackal is like 90.

Quote by Jackal58
Buy stock in Viagra. Imma gonna fuck you in the ass.
#9
You're all missing the point, and it makes me a sad panda.

Improvisation isn't about assembling a cookie-cutter list of your techniques.

It's simple.

Listen to your backing. Decide what sound you want to hear over it at a particular point. Choose a technique that will give you that sound. You want it to sound soulful, maybe do a bit of bending. Frantic? Staccato notes and chromatic passages could convey that pretty well. Relaxed? A few lazy slides and wider intervals can create that kind of feel. And all those things could happen in a matter of seconds, it all depends on what you want to create.

Too many guitarists seem to obsess over the mechanics of playing the instrument but in doing so forget the whole point of a guitar's existence. It's a musical instrument, a way for you, the guitarist, to get the music that's inside you out there. You have to stop putting technique at the front of your thoughts because it's not the burning issue, it's just a tool. And if you use the wrong tool in the wrong situation all your screws fall out.

Listen, then think, then decide. Decide what the hell it is you want to make before running to the toolbox.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#10
basically do blues scale stuff,not very schooled but it gets me by,also tend to come u with solos when recording on the spot,never been able to play lead until i tried this,even though its still pretty bad lol,also triplet patterns up and down neck.
#11
I do a lot of Bends and chromatic runs. I'm not really sure why, but it's like my "go to"
#12
I do the thing where you bend the string, then un-bend it, then pull off to two frets above so it sounds like 3 notes a lot. I bend too much, I need to chill with that, lol.
1950s Reissue Fender Stratocaster
Epiphone Gold Top Les Paul
Fender Hot Rod Deville
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff
Electro-Harmonix Big Muff
Ibanez TS-9
Boss BF-3
Boss DD-6
Wylde Signature Cry Baby
DigiTech Whammy 4
#13
when i improvise i go up and down the scale and do some bends :p yh yh i know i suck XD(still beggineur
#14
If you play a wide array of stuff, you'll find that knowing every technique is half the battle.
The rest is just knowing that 'feel' of what goes where.

Though I will admit:
Quote by supersac
i tap alot probably more than i should

also

e-------7h8p7------------------
b---8------------8-7----
g9-----------------------
d-----------------
i usually find myself eventually playing this whe im improvising

This comes up in my random stuff frequently
: )
#15
Quote by steven seagull
You're all missing the point, and it makes me a sad panda.

Improvisation isn't about assembling a cookie-cutter list of your techniques.

It's simple.

Listen to your backing. Decide what sound you want to hear over it at a particular point. Choose a technique that will give you that sound. You want it to sound soulful, maybe do a bit of bending. Frantic? Staccato notes and chromatic passages could convey that pretty well. Relaxed? A few lazy slides and wider intervals can create that kind of feel. And all those things could happen in a matter of seconds, it all depends on what you want to create.

Too many guitarists seem to obsess over the mechanics of playing the instrument but in doing so forget the whole point of a guitar's existence. It's a musical instrument, a way for you, the guitarist, to get the music that's inside you out there. You have to stop putting technique at the front of your thoughts because it's not the burning issue, it's just a tool. And if you use the wrong tool in the wrong situation all your screws fall out.

Listen, then think, then decide. Decide what the hell it is you want to make before running to the toolbox.



This is true, but there still exists that toolbox, and looking at other toolbox's gives you ideas on what to put in your own. You might have always used a tiny hammer to nail in a nail, and you might do it with emotion and tons of effort. Then you look at another's toolbox and notice that they have a large hammer and think "That would be so useful in my toolbox!"

Sure there are right tools for the job, a small hammer and a big hammer do the same thing. Paring a hammer and a nail is like paring a soulful riff with a soulful backing track. It is something that makes sense. The point of a thread like this isn't to create a list of techniques to use, it is to impregnate the minds of improv guitarists with new ideas to move forward with their instrument. When you were referencing relaxed playing and said "A few lazy slides and wider intervals can create that kind of feel.", someone probably read that and said "That is a good idea, I am going to try combining that into my improv". This is what I was shooting for.

Sorry if the analogy made no sense
#16
Yeah just because you tend to use techniques, doesn't make it cookie cutter. I don't obsess over my techniques, i just tend to use certain things that I like, and that makes my playing unique.
Quote by AgentWiggles
Thanks, douche.


Quote by SlayingDragons
Dude...



Gear:
Ibanez SZ 520QM
Ibanez RG 450DXB
Fender Big Apple Stratocaster
Pod XT Live
Peavey XXX Half Stack
Peavey Bandit 112
and a soul of Rock n' Roll
#17
I tend to listen for a few seconds and try to get a feel for the rhythm part. If I'm playing over something really rhythmically intense, I like to play arpeggios over the rhythm and use the placement of the root notes to emphasize the down beat. It's a trick that was all over The Human Abstract's early stuff.

On the other hand, a smoother track makes me tend towards suggesting pentatonics and intermingling large bends and lazy slides with a hefty dose of vibrato (along with the occasional sixteenth-triplet scalar run to build up to the epic bends).
#18
Quote by steven seagull
You're all missing the point, and it makes me a sad panda.

Improvisation isn't about assembling a cookie-cutter list of your techniques.

It's simple.

Listen to your backing. Decide what sound you want to hear over it at a particular point. Choose a technique that will give you that sound. You want it to sound soulful, maybe do a bit of bending. Frantic? Staccato notes and chromatic passages could convey that pretty well. Relaxed? A few lazy slides and wider intervals can create that kind of feel. And all those things could happen in a matter of seconds, it all depends on what you want to create.

Too many guitarists seem to obsess over the mechanics of playing the instrument but in doing so forget the whole point of a guitar's existence. It's a musical instrument, a way for you, the guitarist, to get the music that's inside you out there. You have to stop putting technique at the front of your thoughts because it's not the burning issue, it's just a tool. And if you use the wrong tool in the wrong situation all your screws fall out.

Listen, then think, then decide. Decide what the hell it is you want to make before running to the toolbox.


I'm going to take this to heart.
#19
Quote by steven seagull
You're all missing the point, and it makes me a sad panda.

+1
#20
Quote by steven seagull

Too many guitarists seem to obsess over the mechanics of playing the instrument but in doing so forget the whole point of a guitar's existence. It's a musical instrument, a way for you, the guitarist, to get the music that's inside you out there. You have to stop putting technique at the front of your thoughts because it's not the burning issue, it's just a tool. And if you use the wrong tool in the wrong situation all your screws fall out.


+1000

Although if this thread wants to be a list of licks, then I see nothing wrong with that either.
#22
I play a lot of arpeggios and do a reasonable amount of scale step-backs (as in you go up the scale, down a bit, up it again). Also if I'm playing in a minor key sometimes I'll do a quick bend from a major note to up to pitch, I think it sounds cool. Marty Friedman does it.
#24
Also if I'm playing in a minor key sometimes I'll do a quick bend from a major note to up to pitch, I think it sounds cool. Marty Friedman does it.


Can you explain that for me more please? Sounds interesting
GENERATION 10: The first time you see this, copy it into your sig on any forum and add 1 to the generation. Social experiment.
#25
whenever moving around in the fretboard, i tend to do the exact same lick as the one i did before i moved

its a really bad habit im trying to break it lol
Gear
- Synyster Schecter Standard
- Peavey Vyper 15

I'm currently using Cubase 5 for any recording purposes.
#26
Quote by a7x4life666
Hammer-ons, pull-offs, tapping, maidenesque triplets, tremolo picking, and even some sweep picking if I'm pretty familiar with the scale. A combination of that and it never gets boring.


+1

With a lot chromatic scales tossed in

EDIT:
Quote by steven seagull
You're all missing the point, and it makes me a sad panda.

Improvisation isn't about assembling a cookie-cutter list of your techniques.



I'm sure you had some sort of point? I and many others must have missed whatever it was supposed to be.

Because a bunch of people came up with what you consider to be the wrong answer.

IMO when you improvise you're going to reach into what you called cookie cutter techniques.

Most of the time when I improvise. It's to a basic beat from a drum machine. It's way more fun than a metronome.

Then start playing around with one or more technique.

I might work on Whammy bar tricks, Tapping or picking techniques. All the things that are the basis of metal and hard rock.

I'm sure that someone who's into blues will end up. Falling back to 12 bar pentatonic scales and lots of bending.

The list goes on and on when you improvise it's going to based on the techniques that are common the genre or even sub genre of music you're playing.
Gear
Jackson DK2
Ibanez RGR320EX
Guild X82 Nova
Godin Seagull S6

Vox V847
Vox VT40+ / VFS5 VT


Quote by FatalGear41

Right now, there are six and a half billion people on earth who don't care what kind of tubes you have in your amplifier
Last edited by Willowthewitch at Apr 28, 2011,
#27
Quote by turtlewax
Can you explain that for me more please? Sounds interesting

Well say you're playing in e minor.
Even though there's no major notes in that key, you could still at some point in the solo/improv use a major note for a split second. It gives it a bit of an exotic sound if done right. You could bend a major 3rd up to a 4th, major 6th up to a minor 7th, and so on. You have to find the right moment to do it, but when you do it sounds really good.

Listen to the solo in Tornado of Souls for an example of that. First bend is a major 7th bent up to root. Few seconds later he bends up a major third to a perfect 4th.

Hope this makes sense.
#28
It does thanks, I think a lot of rock blues use odd major notes anyway....for example Angus Young and Slash both use major 3rds over minor backings.
GENERATION 10: The first time you see this, copy it into your sig on any forum and add 1 to the generation. Social experiment.
#29
I just was messing around last night tryin to improv something... I sweeped, tremolo picked, alternate picked, and shredded penatonics (Ik that sounds lame but that's the only scale IK... )
#30
I like to use dorian and phrygian. Then simple pentatonics that never sound bad. Once that's boring maybe aeolian stuff. Then diminished scales depending on context. Then back to pentatonics? As for techniques, big bends with over the top whammy vibrato is fun. Especially with the wah kicked on. W00t
by the time you read this you will be wasting your time because it doesnt say anything
#31
Slow, crunchy, tasty full bends, and a lot of pulling off and hammering on in the A minor pentatonic position, and trilling.
Quote by progdude93
my fetish is dudes with dicks small enough to pee on their own sacks.