#1
Just been messing around writing harmonies and stuff when a question popped into my head.

Why is it that when you have any sizeable amount of gain, two notes played together at the same time (ie a chord) gives a crunchy sound, instead of the sound you get by recording one note and playing the other over it, or having two guitars play a note each? Do the frequencies interfere with each other or what?

Example: 12th fret on 3rd string, 12th fret on 2nd string. If you play them together you get the usual chord sound, they're not very distinct from each other. Get 2 guitars, each playing one of the notes, it's a clean harmony sound. Why is this?
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#2
I have always thought it was because of the difference in timing. But I have never been very satisfied with that answer and always wondered as well.
What?! There's a clean channel on my amp?!

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#3
Two strings on one guitar= more sound=more volume=more crunch

EDIT Misread. Yeah, its timing.
Try hybrid picking to play a two or three note chord. It sounds very similar on clean.

With distortion, it gets muddied up.
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Mar 30, 2011,
#4
It's because whenever you add two notes together, you produce a third note, with a frequency equal to the difference between the original two. It used to be called il Terzo Suono, now it's usually known as a beat frequency. When you then distort these two notes, you also distort the third tone, which is usually dissonant. If you distort then mix, the beat tone is not distorted.
#5
Quote by AeolianSeventh
It's because whenever you add two notes together, you produce a third note, with a frequency equal to the difference between the original two. It used to be called il Terzo Suono, now it's usually known as a beat frequency. When you then distort these two notes, you also distort the third tone, which is usually dissonant. If you distort then mix, the beat tone is not distorted.


This is new.

Interesting. So a two note chord is actually belting out three notes?
#6
Quote by GS LEAD 5


Interesting. So a two note chord is actually belting out three notes?


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#7
I like to think of it as a soundsalad, in which each ingredient is added individually.
Distort them all in the same signal and you will have mashed potatoes.