#1
I'm learning to play fairly basic pieces of music as I've only been playing for about two months and I have problems with my consistency. I'll say be playing something like this:
e|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
B|-----------------------------6--6-5-----------------------8-6-5-6----------|
G|--5----------5-7--------------------5-7-5--------5-7-7--7---------7-5------|
D|-----7-----7-----5----5-7-8---------------8-7------------------------------|
A|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|

And I'll occasionally miss a certain note, then I'll play it again and I'll play that note but miss a different one. I know its something that'll probably come with practice but is consistency something I should develop fairly quickly or will it take a while?
#2
You develop consistency consistently.
Quote by willT08
Quote by HowSoonisNow
How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
#3
In all seriousness, just keep working on the pieces in small segments, then tackle them as a whole. Take it measure by measure if you have to. I know it's boring but it really does help a lot!
Quote by willT08
Quote by HowSoonisNow
How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
#4
Consistency is something that comes over time. The amount of times you play something helps too, if you're trying to learn a piece play it over and over again because you'll begin to develop muscle memory over the song and playing the right notes will come naturally to you.
#6
Also on the same kind of subject, does playing whilst not having to look down come with playing over time? Or is there something I should practice to be able to play without looking down
#7
Quote by LewisG12345
Also on the same kind of subject, does playing whilst not having to look down come with playing over time? Or is there something I should practice to be able to play without looking down

Its a bit of both, it comes a bit naturally, but you alsohave to practice a bit. At least it was like that with my case
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#8
What's your experience with chords, keys and scales? I wouldn't assume too much after 2 months, but if you did get a firm grasp on them that lick above would make a lot more sense.

As for playing without looking, that is a skill which should also be practiced. An easy way to start is by playing infront of the mirror. You can look up but still see your hand. Easy.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#9
Quote by Aguamento
you'll begin to develop muscle memory over the song and playing the right notes will come naturally to you.


i completely disagree. muscle memory is for people who don't understand music. and i'm not talking about people who don't know how to construct a dominant 13(b9) chord in the key of Bb. i'm talking about people who don't understand the very basic musical fundamentals. muscle memory is not musical memory. muscle memory tends to ruin musicians -- though typically more for pianists than guitarists, i admit.

avoid using muscle memory. ESPECIALLY if you want to be able to play without looking. learning to play without looking is like learning to sight read. the only way to do it is to just do it. familiarize yourself with the fretboard without using sight.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#10
Muscle memory isnt bad, it's just it shouldnt be the be al,l end all of ones musicality. In that I totally side with AW, if thats what he's trying to say. I would say that if muscle memory ruins musicians, it simply reveals that they weren't musicians in the first place.

Maybe for them a skill was more a stunt than a creative tool, maybe it was an ego thing, whatever it was, at some point they quit and thought that was all that was needed. But then over time, they come to the realization that everything they did was as hollow as their ambitions.

F A C Eb G Bb Db

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Mar 30, 2011,
#11
Quote by LewisG12345
I'm learning to play fairly basic pieces of music as I've only been playing for about two months and I have problems with my consistency. I'll say be playing something like this:
e|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
B|-----------------------------6--6-5-----------------------8-6-5-6----------|
G|--5----------5-7--------------------5-7-5--------5-7-7--7---------7-5------|
D|-----7-----7-----5----5-7-8---------------8-7------------------------------|
A|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|

And I'll occasionally miss a certain note, then I'll play it again and I'll play that note but miss a different one. I know its something that'll probably come with practice but is consistency something I should develop fairly quickly or will it take a while?



it takes time. Don't worry about it. Just keep practicing.


Quote by AeolianWolf

avoid using muscle memory. ESPECIALLY if you want to be able to play without looking. learning to play without looking is like learning to sight read. the only way to do it is to just do it. familiarize yourself with the fretboard without using sight.


Well, you really can't (and don't want to even if you could) avoid muscle memory. Practice something to the point where you can play it and "muscle memory" just happens. it's an important part of why you can just pick up the guitar and play that song again.

muscle memory = retention of motor skills. Kinda valuable for a musician.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 30, 2011,
#12
Theres no way to avoid muscle memory. In reality it is Brain memory for that movement or muscle. either you develop relaxed memory (good) or tension (bad). You should take that piece practice it slow. This will help develop a relaxed technique. rather then your muscle tensing up. double pick everything note starting on up and down strokes. pick every note 3 times or 4 times. all these are important to develop more of a universal playing.

This is more of a question for the (guitar technique) form. focus on the way it feels and the way it sounds when your playing. Correct practicing and economy of motion will help you. John Petrucci's rock discipline is a great dvd theres videos on youtube. He teaches the importance of warming up stretching and practicing.

pretty much take everyone song you practice and play it anyway you can think of.
#13
I didn't like Petrucci's Rock Discipline. Too much bland exercises and not enough musical material, too much emphasis on the metronome aswell.
#14
Quote by griffRG7321
I didn't like Petrucci's Rock Discipline. Too much bland exercises and not enough musical material, too much emphasis on the metronome aswell.


I agree those excersizes suck but i see them as just examples. He does mention ways to practice without the metronome. And many great examples of how you should practice. which is just all together good advice. Iv always made up my own excersizes anyway.

stretches and legatos is what i lack the most. so watching how he warms up and practices that stuff better helped me for more effective practicing. Breaking down your scales into fragments and speed burst. most importantly playing these for a longer period of time. for atleast a minute or so. Its all great stuff to be aware off and theres usually always something i do not think of when i practice.

Im not all about speed. but it is nice to be able to play faster stuff. like soloing to a metal song.