#1
So kind of top on my list of things to learn right now are intervals, for arpeggiating and for keeping up with chord changes during songs (i.e., in blues when it moves from the I to the IV chord it's a perfect fourth, so if I got that translated to the fretboard in time I can keep up with the song better when improving).

Do you guys learn the notes on the fretboard, and memorize each interval? As in, "the perfect fourth of x is y" "the minor third of w is x" or whatever?

Or do you learn shapes (or perhaps all of the above?), as in, up a string and up 2 frets is a perfect 5th (until you need to deal with the b string at least).

If you do learn it by shapes can you give me a link with all the different ways of playing intervals on the fretboard?

Thanks a lot.

--Also, does anybody else have issues responding to threads sometimes? Sometimes when I try to respond it just like freezes up or whatever...
#2
it starts with the major scale
whole whole half- whole- whole whole half

like C major goes: C (wholestep) D )wholestep) E )halfstep) F (whole) G

E is the 3rd note from C and G is the 5th note and so on
#3
I don't follow any of those conventions though I know them all. I teach in an entirely different way than these. But to be fair, the student is prepared for it long before they realize they were being prepared for it. Its an intentional thing Im doing in the context of what I teach. No one as I teach them, sees the big picture like I do, and it's kind of fun when they realize what they can do and that I'd been orchestrating everything towards certain moments of that kind of revelation, the whole time.

I've jokingly been accused of hypnosis and mind programming

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Mar 30, 2011,
#4
Quote by marshmellow666
it starts with the major scale
whole whole half- whole- whole whole half

like C major goes: C (wholestep) D )wholestep) E )halfstep) F (whole) G

E is the 3rd note from C and G is the 5th note and so on

I know how to form intervals, what I'm wondering is what I should be doing to be able to apply that knowledge better to my playing.

If I'm improvising and it suddenly comes to an E major chord, I don't have the time to work through everything to figure out the chord tones are E, A, and B - I either need to know a quick pattern, or know the tones ahead of time as well as the notes on the fretboard.
#5
Quote by -TM-
So kind of top on my list of things to learn right now are intervals, for arpeggiating and for keeping up with chord changes during songs (i.e., in blues when it moves from the I to the IV chord it's a perfect fourth, so if I got that translated to the fretboard in time I can keep up with the song better when improving).

Do you guys learn the notes on the fretboard, and memorize each interval? As in, "the perfect fourth of x is y" "the minor third of w is x" or whatever?

Or do you learn shapes (or perhaps all of the above?), as in, up a string and up 2 frets is a perfect 5th (until you need to deal with the b string at least).

If you do learn it by shapes can you give me a link with all the different ways of playing intervals on the fretboard?

Thanks a lot.

--Also, does anybody else have issues responding to threads sometimes? Sometimes when I try to respond it just like freezes up or whatever...


I learned them within the Major scale 1st. Then I learned the remaining intervals based on their relationship to those intervals. You want to become familiar with the shapes/location on fretboard, as well as the sound of each interval.

Quote by -TM-
I know how to form intervals, what I'm wondering is what I should be doing to be able to apply that knowledge better to my playing.

If I'm improvising and it suddenly comes to an E major chord, I don't have the time to work through everything to figure out the chord tones are E, A, and B - I either need to know a quick pattern, or know the tones ahead of time as well as the notes on the fretboard.



Well, when your playing music you obviously don't have time to (and shouldn't be) figuring out chord tones. You have to work that out through practice/study.
You should be familiar with whatever progression you improvise over, so there should be no "suddenly comes to this or that". It's not sudden when you're familiar with it.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 30, 2011,
#6
Quote by -TM-
I know how to form intervals, what I'm wondering is what I should be doing to be able to apply that knowledge better to my playing.

If I'm improvising and it suddenly comes to an E major chord, I don't have the time to work through everything to figure out the chord tones are E, A, and B - I either need to know a quick pattern, or know the tones ahead of time as well as the notes on the fretboard.



Then you don't have any of your theory, worked out to where it is available to you, in a usable form in real time. This means that your ability to call them to mind and use them in real time is not there. This is a microcosm of the problem I suppose I have with someone that claims to know theory. Intellectually they may understand and assent to certain things, but that doesn't mean they can use it in real time. It's like 99% knowledge, and 1% usefulness...and a lot of wasted effort unless they intend to create music in a closet, and stay that way.

You know stuff, but not in any good way to apply it in real time, or at least start developing the skill sets in real time.

I think if we all were in a room together and started playing and such, we'd quickly see who knew something, in terms of theory in real time, and who didn't.

You can come up with the right answer, sure, but if it takes you 4 minutes to do so, what good is that? Are you going to half that time to 2 minutes in 4 years from now?

By the way if you come to an E chord suddenly, your tones are E G# and B...not E A and B. - That would be an Esus4.

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Mar 30, 2011,
#7
btw, I have a method that works real well for my students. I'd be glad to walk you through it for free if you want. (via skype)
shred is gaudy music
#8
Quote by Sean0913
Then you don't have any of your theory, worked out to where it is available to you, in a usable form in real time. This means that your ability to call them to mind and use them in real time is not there. This is a microcosm of the problem I suppose I have with someone that claims to know theory. Intellectually they may understand and assent to certain things, but that doesn't mean they can use it in real time. It's like 99% knowledge, and 1% usefulness...and a lot of wasted effort unless they intend to create music in a closet, and stay that way.

You know stuff, but not in any good way to apply it in real time, or at least start developing the skill sets in real time.

I think if we all were in a room together and started playing and such, we'd quickly see who knew something, in terms of theory in real time, and who didn't.

You can come up with the right answer, sure, but if it takes you 4 minutes to do so, what good is that? Are you going to half that time to 2 minutes in 4 years from now?

By the way if you come to an E chord suddenly, your tones are E G# and B...not E A and B. - That would be an Esus4.

Sean


Real time? So making music by yourself where you have time to think and plan things out better is not real?

You're talking as though only jamming is worthy.
#9
Real time just means "as it occurs" or "live", like the Stock exchange is updated in "real time", it wouldn't be much use if you invested millions in something that collapsed 30 seconds ago, you have to know what it's worth at that second. Much like it's not much use jamming in E major when the rest of the band has packed up and left the room.
#10
I learned it while learning chord construction... once I realized that a major chord was 1 3 5 so C major was C E G I realized that D must be 2 and F must be 4 and so on and so on, now when someone tells me to sharp or flat an interval I think of the interval in relation to a major7 chord and I pretty much konw which note to change right away....

basically I think it really just comes with practice.
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#11
Quote by krypticguitar87
I learned it while learning chord construction... once I realized that a major chord was 1 3 5 so C major was C E G I realized that D must be 2 and F must be 4 and so on and so on, now when someone tells me to sharp or flat an interval I think of the interval in relation to a major7 chord and I pretty much konw which note to change right away....

basically I think it really just comes with practice.
I think that's really what it comes down to.

I personally base all my intervals off of the major scale, as I've studied it enough that it's pretty automatic to me to say that Bb is the 4th note of the F major scale.

At first I would have to count F G A B, for example, and then do the half-step thing until I found out that it's a P4, not an Aug4. But you should get to the point where you first of all, automatically realize a type of to a type of B is a fourth, then recognize F to Bb as a perfect fourth, because you recognize it from the F major scale.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#12
Quote by Jehannum
Real time? So making music by yourself where you have time to think and plan things out better is not real?

You're talking as though only jamming is worthy.


Read what I said about making music in a closet. If thats what you intend to do, that's fine, and valid. Why not know how to do both?

Just my opinion, I don't mean to speak for you or anyone else.

Best,

Sean
#13
Quote by krypticguitar87
I learned it while learning chord construction... once I realized that a major chord was 1 3 5 so C major was C E G I realized that D must be 2 and F must be 4 and so on and so on, now when someone tells me to sharp or flat an interval I think of the interval in relation to a major7 chord and I pretty much konw which note to change right away....

basically I think it really just comes with practice.


Practice is important no matter what you use to get there.

Sean
#14
The most important part of learning intervals is knowing what they sound like...I'm amazed this hasn't been mentioned yet.
Actually called Mark!

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#15
I would learn the major scale shape on guitar, either caged or 3 note per string, fully. Then using the first octave of that scale learn the interval names between the notes. For example in G Major

G - A = Major 2nd
G - B = Major 3rd
G - C = Perfect 4th
G - D = Perfect 5th
G - E = Major 6th
G - f# = Major 7th

Then play the intervals using the scale pattern, Name them as you play them and memorise how they sound. Some people use song references to help them remember Interval sounds. Example

G-A = Major 2nd Sounds like You really got me by the kinks
G-B = Major 3rd Sounds like Oh when the saints

etc.

Figure out your own references as this whill help you remember the intervals.

Make sure you do this on the fretboard and can visualise the intervals so the pattern is easily transferrable up and doown the fretboard.

Once you can find the intervals in any position learn which chord sits on which note of the scale. In G major the chords would be as follows.

Chord 1 = G Major
Chord 2 = a minor
Chord 3 = b minor
Chord 4 = C Major
Chord 5 - D Major
Chord 6 = e minor
Chord 7 = f# half diminshed

Again play the scale up and down slowly and name the chords related to each interval. Then try and visualise the scale off the guitar again naming the chord types. This pattern of major, minor, and half diminshed chords is the same in every major key so once you have it nailed in G you should be able to quickly transfer the knowledge up and down the fretboard in any key.

Would also be helpful to study how chords are built to back up this information
#16
I learn intervals from the chromatic scale, That showed me the major scale. So i learned how to play the major and minor scale everywhere. Then You need to learn the notes for each triad to really nail the chords effectively.

Patterns and chord shapes only get you so far. But what happens when you want to move the chords higher or lower? Its nice to just know the notes. Your still going to use the patterns and chord shapes you remember. But you will also know the notes so all bases are covered.

You can also alter the major scale everywhere to minor. so you will learn where the 3 6 7 is that you must flatin to b3 b6 b7