#1
We don't have access to recording a fullblown drum set, and we have tried recording electronic drums but it sounds to sterile and the "same."
Are there any programs/drum machines we could use for rock that don't sound so fake and sterile?
Thanks!
#5
It is for me, at least...
I just spent an hour with it actually, trying to mix with it. It is much harder to master however, because it has so many features... EZdrummer can be enough depending on your needs, but AD has a thousand more features. I love how you can actually decide how your microphones are placed on some drums... you can also blend the top and bottom mics for the snare, stuff like that =)
#6
The best are Steven Slate Drums, Addictive Drums, Superior Drummer then EZ Drummer (in order from best to worst).
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#7
I actually really like Steven Slate drums. I think it's great. The only thing I don't think is good about it is its double bass. It sounds pretty bad, but everything else is just amazing!
#8
From another thread I posted this in...

Programmed drums can sound awesome. It depends entirely on the quality of the samples and the skill of the person programming them. Usually the problem is someone has pointed and clicked a really mechanical and stilted rhythm and is triggering second-rate samples, so it sounds crappy. Listen to the Pyromania album by Def Leppard. That's all sampled drums and the album sounds absolutely fantastic. Of course, it was done by Mutt Lange.....

A couple of things to help make them better:
-If you have something like a Roland drum module - even something simple:


Of course, a high-quality electronic kit will give you even more options.

Actually play the parts on the pads or get a real drummer to play the parts on the pads. Do it to a click, and don't quantize anything. Just edit as required. You will maintain that human feel because it was done by a human!

-use real cymbals and hats. Use samples for the rest.

-Use dry samples and add processing as required. Part of the problem with samples is that they are too processed, and therefore don't sound natural.

-make sure your samples actually sound like real drums.

-make sure your pads are velocity sensitive, and that your software supports velocity layers. Assign slightly different samples to be played as dictated by how hard the pads are hit. Alternately, do this manually by adjusting velocities in your software.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Quote by axemanchris
From another thread I posted this in...

Programmed drums can sound awesome. It depends entirely on the quality of the samples and the skill of the person programming them. Usually the problem is someone has pointed and clicked a really mechanical and stilted rhythm and is triggering second-rate samples, so it sounds crappy. Listen to the Pyromania album by Def Leppard. That's all sampled drums and the album sounds absolutely fantastic. Of course, it was done by Mutt Lange.....

I swear someone pays you to promote Mr. Lange


But yeah, the quality of the samples and the skill of the person programming them is what matters most - I get told my drums on demo tracks before recording real drums sound good, and all I use is a sample loader (Ultrabeat in Logic Pro) and program my collection of samples by hand with the piano roll MIDI Editor.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#10
one of the easiest ways to get rid of the that sterile sound is to use the velocity setting in the piano roll. give the strong beats a bit more punch and back off on the weak beats. doesnt even have to be super fancy, just spend a bit of time doing it.
#11
Are sampled cymbals not good? or worth trying? We are getting addictive drums too, what all do we need?
#12
I like the cymbal sounds from addictive (the rest of it sounds great as well). Depending on what you're going for, you may be just fine with that.
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#13
All the demos I see of triggered drums are for metal? Any reason why? We planned on using it for alternative rock? Will it sound okay?
#14
you can definitely set triggers to be more dynamic and not so robotic feeling. Its all in the parameters of the drum module where the triggers plug into. How it sounds will depend on the type of plugin/samples you use.

The biggest reason metal drummers use triggers is because there will always be a proportion of speed to power. It becomes more difficult to get power behind your hits if you're drumming 16th notes at really high tempos. To get some consistency with their volume and hits, they'll usually use triggers set with a high sensitivity.
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#15
Quote by DisarmGoliath
I swear someone pays you to promote Mr. Lange


I'm nerdy like that. Most of my biggest musical idols are producers and people from bands that "almost but didn't quite make the big time."



CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#16
EZ Drummer will help you aviod sounding so fake, if you lcik the humanize button, it will give you a random velocity so no two hits sound the same which is cool. The best way to aviod it sounding very machenical is to play it in using a MIDI keyboard as then you will never get it completely quanitzed (unless your a great keyboard drummer). Getting good sounding drums from computer software is hard, what DAW are you using?