#1
Along with my band, I write a lot of music on my guitar. Most of the time it's melodic metal. My band's singer is able to use a small studio his school has to record an EP our band will be making for free. He has also written 5 songs for his own solo acoustic EP, which he will produce for free. I have been given the same privilege to make my own album, probably consisting of 4-5 tracks.

I have a few questions.

-Should I add lyrics to the songs? I write lyrics a lot but I can't sing that well. Should I use them for this or for my band?

-Should I record drums/bass/etc as well? I know just hearing a guitar for 5 songs could get boring. Or should I use some drum loops?

-Should I stick to a set genre? Many of the pieces I write are 'metal', and even if I write different types, they're all on electric guitar.

Bear in mind, I'd be making this mainly for myself, to feel accomplished that I could write an EP myself. I don't plan on this getting anywhere, but I think it would be a good way to start marketing myself for when I get older, if I kept it up in college.

Also, if you could recommend me some solo albums, I'd love that to get some more influences. I listen to Jeff Loomis, Joe Satriani, some Neal Young, and others. I'm definitely not a note shredder yet, but I'm gonna get there.
Quote by willT08
Quote by HowSoonisNow
How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
#2
What kind of music do you listen to? "Solo album" is an incredibly vague term. Also why wouldn't you have other instruments? Many of the albums Duke Ellington played on are solo albums and they usually have an entire big band. Doesn't mean it isn't a solo album just because it's not music for an unaccompanied instrument. Regardless, here are some of my favorite "solo albums":

Frank Zappa - Hot Rats; Zappa in New York; Jazz from Hell; YCDTOSA vol2 [jazz fusion/prog rock]
Miles Davis - Kind of Blue; Bitches Brew; Big Fun; Sketches of Spain; Porgy and Bess [jazz/third-stream/jazz fusion]
Herbie Hancock - Maiden Voyage; Thrust; Headhunters; Man-Child [jazz-funk/jazz]
Allan Holdsworth - Sand; None too Soon [jazz fusion]
John Coltrane - Blue Train; Dakar; Giant Steps; Ballads [jazz]
Mike Oldfield - Tubular Bells; Ommadawn; Music of the Spheres [folk/prog rock]
Ornette Coleman - The Shape of Jazz to Come; This is Our Music [free jazz]
Paco de Lucía - 12 Canciones De Garcia Lorca Para Guitarra [flamenco]
T-Bone Walker - The Original Source (I don't have an album by him, only this huge-ass compilation; good stuff) [blues]
Wes Montgomery - The Incredible Jazz Guitar of Wes Montgomery; Wes Montgomery Trio; Bumpin' [jazz]
Yngwie Malmsteen - Rising Force [neoclassical metal]
Michael Hoenig - Departure From Northern Wasteland [Berlin school electronic]

Sorry for the big list. If you decide to check any of these out then the ones in italics are my favorites.
Last edited by Sóknardalr at Mar 31, 2011,
#3
You should definitely add in bass and drums, at least for a couple songs otherwise your EP will sound boring most likely. Don't add lyrics unless you can sing, no one wants to hear bad singing (no offense). You don't have to stick to a genre, especially since you said this'll mainly be for yourself. Just play the songs you like best despite the genre.
#4
Thanks. I should have added that I wasn't sure about the other instruments because I'm not sure if I'll have anyone else to work with. I've written 2 full guitar parts so far and I can kind of think out the bass and drums, so I will add those myself if I can't get anyone else to help.
Quote by willT08
Quote by HowSoonisNow
How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
#5
Quote by thePTOD

-Should I add lyrics to the songs? I write lyrics a lot but I can't sing that well.


Well, if you don't, will it just be some guy on a guitar playing riffs, or will there actually be melodic content that I will want to listen to? You can always hire a singer if the lyrics and melodies are already written.

Quote by thePTOD

Should I use them for this or for my band?


That's up to you. Consider your relationship with your band, though, when making that decision. Also consider (and maybe get your band's advice) what songs might not even be appropriate for the band to do in the first place.

Quote by thePTOD

-Should I record drums/bass/etc as well? I know just hearing a guitar for 5 songs could get boring.


As a guitarist, even *I* would rather drive nails into my head than listen to some solo guitarist wank on a bunch of riffs for 20 minutes.

Quote by thePTOD

Or should I use some drum loops?


Add anything you can to make it sound as good as you can. Even if it is just for your own personal sense of satisfaction, you'll want to record something that you'll be happy with, right?

Quote by thePTOD

-Should I stick to a set genre? Many of the pieces I write are 'metal', and even if I write different types, they're all on electric guitar.


If it's just for your own personal sense of satisfaction, you don't need to be concerned with catering to a specific audience. If you planned on making a name for yourself and selling it... then you should consider appealing to an audience.

Quote by thePTOD

Bear in mind, I'd be making this mainly for myself, to feel accomplished that I could write an EP myself. I don't plan on this getting anywhere, but I think it would be a good way to start marketing myself for when I get older, if I kept it up in college.


So, that's great. Seriously. But make something you're going to be proud of five, ten, fifteen years from now. Make something that YOU would want to listen to. Make something that, when you play it for others, they will be impressed, whether it's their "thing" or not.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.