#1
NOTE: I will report you if you bash/flame in any way.


So I've recently started a band and we take influences from all kinda of rock and metal, whether it would be Strapping Young Lad, Meshuggah, Nevermore, The Black Dahlia Murder, Avenged Sevenfold, Children of Bodom, etc.
Now for a song I'm writing, I want to have that typical A7x-sounding twin lead part, but I'm not sure where to start. Is there some way anyone can explain to me how to make it sound good? (I know a bit about 3rd and 5th intervals that are typically used in twin leads, but I'm guessing I want the 3rd interval leads)


Thanks a lot guys!
Another unoriginal prog head.
#2
For an A7X kind of sound you'll want to use different harmonies than just the third. Synyster doesn't always use standard parallel harmony parts so your best bet is probably to read up on theory and study their songs.

For almost any other metal band, diatonic 3rd will do the job.
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#3
A7X... *Shudder*

From what I've heard A7X tend to use minor 3rd intervals to harmonise twin leads - This is a pretty common method for doing so. Simply play one of the lead parts three semitones higher or lower than the other lead part.

EDIT - Guess Zaphod knows more about A7X than me, not suprising really. Minor 3rd intervals seem to work pretty well in general though for twin leads.
#5
Quote by Anon17
A7X... *Shudder*

From what I've heard A7X tend to use minor 3rd intervals to harmonise twin leads - This is a pretty common method for doing so. Simply play one of the lead parts three semitones higher or lower than the other lead part.

EDIT - Guess Zaphod knows more about A7X than me, not suprising really. Minor 3rd intervals seem to work pretty well in general though for twin leads.


Straight minor thirds will almost always sound pretty wrong if you're looking for that standard metal "look, we own Iron Maiden albums!" sound. Diatonic thirds is what you want for that.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#6
Dayum, thanks Zaphod. I knew some notes were off when I was playing straight minor thirds.
Another unoriginal prog head.
#7
I'm gonna be *that* guy and gush about how I like diatonic sixth harmonies.

What I find helps with harmonized playing is to take the hook or theme of the lead part and, rather than straight diatonic harmonization, try to play a counter melody. Recording the melody or hook then just listening and trying to figure out what the harmony needs to do with the melody to have the effect you want.

I don't know much about A7X, but what I have heard of their leads isn't always straight Iron Maiden thirds. There are some surprisingly interesting bits in there that aren't parallel harmonization. Take a look at those melodies and counters and try to figure out how the harmony affects the melody's impact and how they work together.
#9
idk much about a7x but try listening to some machine head, songs like halo have intense dual guitar solos that might give you some inspiration.
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ibanez rg3exfm1
schecter avenger 7-string with emgs
esp/ltd mh-50
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#10
I like the suggestions others have made... I'm not going to duplicate anyone else, I'll go a diffrent direction with my post just to give you more options.

It's not metal and the sound is nothing like what your going for. But the idea is the same, I would recommend checking out some old motown. It's almost like James Jamerson would be doing a duet with the singer. His basslines were unbelivably melodic yet there were also great harmonies. His lines complement the singer perfectly and their dynamics were crazy good. When ever I hear twin leads I always think back to his playing.

Granted it's diffrent, but the same principals apply... I would recommend giving a few of these links a listen. Look for the dynamics between them. How they complement and play off of each other. It's pure magic IMO


I'm gonna make you love me- Diana Ross & The Temps
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vI844RAJo58

Whats going on- Marvin Gaye
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9KC7uhMY9s

Dear Darling- Jackson 5
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ND-iW51idC0

For once in my life- Stevie Wonder
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4bAliqnJMGI
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Well played, sir, well played.
#11
This helps my band come up with different parts: record the main part in a program like Garageband and then pan it all the way left. Set up a second track panned all the way right. Experiment with new twin parts against the main part. This way one guitarist doesn't get bored of playing the same stuff over and over while the other one figures out the twin part.
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