#1
Hey, This is my first post here and I'm just looking for some advice, I have never played Guitar before but I decided to start playing recently, I have purchased a new Harley Benson HBR10 (Like a Jackson Rhodes with a offset V) with amp and a lead... My friend is also giving me his limited edition Michael Padget signature for my birthday so i've got what I need to get started.

So to start off i'm looking for some fun stuff to learn, Now let me make it clear I am not musically retarded as I have been drumming for the last 6-7 years so I know alot about music and the extreme basics of guitar like holding it and tuning it. But thats about it. I have been watching some youtube tutorials but still need more help.

Now im looking for some tutorials to teach me what i need to know and as quickly as possible I have allocated time to practice 4-5 hours a day after collage but I really want to get playing some awesome and impressive riffs and more advanced things as quick as possible.

Im intrested in a couple of bands such as Bullet for my Valentine, and Metallica, I am a big fan of both bands and really want to learn to play advanced songs like theres.

So if you can list some tutorials please go ahead and do so. I really need the help.

EDIT:
Wow what a douche bag I forgot to say thanks.

Thanks for reading, Hope you have some tutorials for me. Thanks again
Blazedout...
Last edited by Blazedout at Mar 31, 2011,
#2
Have you considered and can you afford lessons? Learning on your own is cool and shows real motivation, but having a good instructor will prevent you from learning all the bad habits. Bad habits can hinder learning.
#3
When I first started I took lessons until I became decent. It makes it a lot easier to learn when you have a live teacher. However, Justinguitar is a really good site and has lots of good lessons
#4
Thanks for spending time to reply.

I have been considering taking lessons. I have yet had the chance to look, But im going to check at my local music store and in papers for some ads, I have check the internet for teachers nearbye but had very little luck,

I have considered taking lessons just to get me started, I am a little streched for money at the moment but my birthday is in june and Im sure I will get some money then. However I have close friends who can teach me the basics untill then..

I will also check out the Justinguitar website and see what I can pickup from there.

Thanks for the help. If you have anymore please keep it coming,

EDIT:
As for getting into bad habits I do understand exactly what you mean, When learning drums I got into several bad habits such as slouching and playing flat footed but I quickly got it drilled out with some practice but I will be sure that if I learn myself to watch several tutorials and find the best tecnique,
Last edited by Blazedout at Mar 31, 2011,
#5
I think getting close friends to teach you would be fine. It's just a lot easier to learn when someones showing you
#6
Yeah I was going to suggest if your friend has been playing for a while and is a good player hook up with him and play together if you can't take lessons. I've always found practicing with a more experienced player improves learning greatly wether it is a teacher or just a buddy. However the teacher if he or she is good at what they do is wort their weight in gold IMO. Biggest thing I can say no matter which route you go learn clean and slowly before trying to be impressive it will save you years of heartache in the future.
#7
I strongly suggest learning all the modes in g major (just search modes in lessons and it will come up), and then using alternate picking and legato (hammer ons and pull offs) to go up and down the modes. I do plan on eventually posting some relevant lessons from frank gambale if I have the time, but that should help jumpstart your playing.
also, "one" by metallica isn't too difficult (until the speedy part near the end) and will get you more comfortable with playing in general. I also suggest acquiring guitar pro....it makes learning songs much easier
#8
you're a drummer, I thought you said you weren't musically retarded

jk, but for serious, try learning the intro to enter sandman, I find that the riffs used for the intro are really fun, and some people find them actually impressive.

I totally recommend a teacher, they can help you about 10000000x more than the internets can. they can physically see any mistakes you are making, and can see when you don't understand and figure out how to help you from there....

however if you choose not to take lessons, you should try learning a few chords, I usually start with the open chords

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/guide_to_guitar__part_1__basics_and_open_chords.html

^this is a pretty good article with diagrams for a bunch of open chords.... you will find it very helpful to work on switching between these chords.... good luck and welcome to the wonderful world of guitar!
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
Last edited by krypticguitar87 at Mar 31, 2011,
#9
Like you did on drums... start simple and work your way up... and imitate your idols along the way!!!

When you first started playing drums you probably spent quite a while playing a simple beat trying to match a metranome. Do the same with guitar... find an easy song "Oh Suzana", "Puff the Magic Dragon", "8 days a week", "Yesterday", any camp fire song ever written.

These songs are relativly easy they have a moderate/slow tempo and not too many chord changes. When you feel you can play through chord changes without much trouble. Learn to play your chords in all the positions... 2nd position is the typical barre chord, ect... bam your on your way to being a rythm guitarist, your drumming background will probably help a ton with that.

After that you will already know your chords so you can play chordal notes "chromatics"... then start to learn some scales and modes... and then you'll know some "Note scales". Combine "chromatics" and "note scales" and you'll be well on your way to being the next Hendrix

Truth be told there is no golden rule on how to learn guitar... you can lock yourself in a room and study 10 hours a day with a teacher. You could jam with friends a couple hours a week and never open up a book. There is right or wrong way to learn. No two people learn the same, find what works best for you.
Quote by MetlHed94



Well played, sir, well played.
#10
I would agree with the other guys. If you can find a local teacher or a friend who can play well and afford it, then go for it, it helps you to get a very solid foundation for later stage. If there isn't any luck on local teachers or friends. Then get some instructional DVDs or programs that gives you a system to step by step learning. That would be the steady way to progress.
#11
Quote by krypticguitar87
You're a drummer, I thought you said you weren't musically retarded

LOL, Anyways thanks for all the support so far everyone its been real helpful, Please keep it coming, I guess to start off I will do the following:
- Tune the guitar
- Learn the basic chords
- Develop my picking
- Develop Hammer ons and pull offs
- Start learning some basic riffs using tabs,

I think I will give Enter sandman and One a go after I get the basics, I have also ordered the "Riffs and Leads: Michael padget" dvd so I will run over some of the tecniques on there, just thought of another question while im at it, Will i be able to string bend without affecting the tuneing, Just a on the fly question I thought of.

Edit: What about the opening to Nothing else matters that seems pretty straight forward I know its on acoustic on the album but live they play it on electric, So i guess that would be another good one..

Thanks again for the help please keep it coming,
Last edited by Blazedout at Apr 1, 2011,
#12
when it comes to bending it all depends on the quality of the guitar, I've played some that come out of tune almost everytime you make a full bend or bigger. however, you probably don't need to worry about it because if it changes your tuning at all it will mostlikely be very slightly....

also if I remember correctly nothing else matters intro is pretty easy... infact there are a ton of easier riffs by metallica, I have found that they were great to start learning riffs and some of the solo work really helped me learn a bit of lead.

oh and this is also a pretty fun one to learn from fade to black, although it is really the only riff in the song that I would classify as beginner:


|------------------------|------------------------|
|------------------------|------------------------|
|-------0----------------|-------0----------------|
|----4-----4-----4-----4-|----4-----4-----4-----4-|
|-2-----------2-----5----|-0-----------0-----5----|
|------------------------|------------------------|

|------------------------|------------------------|
|------------------------|------------------------|
|-------0----------------|-------2----------------|
|----4-----4-----4-----4-|----2-----2-----2-----2-|
|-2-----------2-----5----|-4-----------4-----0----|
|------------------------|------------------------|


its the acoustic in the beginning, its one of the first riffs I learned after learning up to the first verse of enter sandman.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#13
Quote by shred_wizzard
I strongly suggest learning all the modes in g major (just search modes in lessons and it will come up), and then using alternate picking and legato (hammer ons and pull offs) to go up and down the modes. I do plan on eventually posting some relevant lessons from frank gambale if I have the time, but that should help jumpstart your playing.
also, "one" by metallica isn't too difficult (until the speedy part near the end) and will get you more comfortable with playing in general. I also suggest acquiring guitar pro....it makes learning songs much easier

I'm sorry, but that's not even useful advice for an experienced player, let alone a beginner.

Modes ffs

TS, start at the beginning - you have to. I appreciate there's music you want to play but it's not going to happen overnight, you'll need to be patient and there's some rather unexciting donkeywork that needs to be done but that's just the way it is. Like you've rightly said, those bands write relatively advanced music and it's not something you can realistically expect to even attempt to play at the beginning. Playing the guitar is un-natural, your body's never done it before and as such it's going to feel extremely awkward for a while. You need to spend some time simply getting used to how it feels and having it there.

Learn some open chords and start to get a feel for the instrument, they'll get your hands used to holding the guitar and pressing down the strings, but more importantly chords are the backbone of all guitar music and an understanding of them is vital if you want to progress later. The best place to learn them is right at the start because they're the easiest way to get music to come out of a guitar.

Learn a few chordy songs, stuff like Wonderwall which I admit is an awful song but as something that can be accomplished fairly easily with not too much experience it's a valuable tool. Learning guitar is very much like learning karate was for Daniel-san, there's a lot of stuff that doesn't look particularly exciting and you may well be tempted to skim over it or ignore it altogether but trust me, it's all important - and quite often the things that seem the most irrelevant or insignificant to you are actually the ones you should be paying the most attention to.

So, start at the beginning - get a few chords under your belt and learn a few songs with simple strumming patterns, once your hands are getting a little stronger and more mobile learn barre chords and most importantly understand how they can be used as a substitute for open chords and how they help you move round the fretboard. Play around with different strumming and pickinfg patterns, you don't just have to strum chords up and down, you can play partial chords or arpeggiate out individua notes. Learn how chords are constructed from the major scale too - you don't need to delve particularly deeply into theory at this point, just learn where your notes are on the fretboard and learn how to construct the major scale and how to harmonise it to create chords. By that point you've automatically learned how to play powerchords without even trying so there's no point wasting effort energy trying to "learn" them any beforehand - that gives you a core set of rhythm skills and a basic understanding of how things work - from there you're ready to start looking at lead stuff.

I'd say those are things you HAVE to do, nothing to stop you doing other stuff in the meantime but if you want to give yourself a solid foundation to progress from the sooner you have those things under your belt the better.
Actually called Mark!

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