#1
So I can play the instruments and get them all into reaper but after that I'm completely new to all this technical stuff so can someone help me get a foot in the door by explaining how I can mix and eq my drums bass and lead and rhythm guitar parts to blend nicely? Also for the drums I'm using ezdrummer.
#2
Mixing - balancing the relative volume and frequency content of a number of sound sources. Typically, these sound sources are the different musical instruments in a band or the sections of an orchestra.

There's no one way to mix and eq. What may work for one mix may not work for another. That's why you shouldn't ever take stock in presets. That said...

Make sure the sound is great at the source. The player needs to be tight and the tone needs to be decent.

Take a listen to one of your favorite mixes. If it's a good mix, try to figure out why it's a good mix. Also it may be good to listen to a bad mix. It helps you stay away what they potentially did wrong.

Another good tip I learned is with each guitar track, start with a high pass filter at around 70 Hz and a low pass at around 12k Hz. Play with these numbers to get an overall sound. These filters take out the frequencies unneeded for guitar (guitar is mostly a mid ranged instrument).

I'm kinda busy and really tired atm so I'm going to stop there for now.
Last edited by Meelad360 at Mar 31, 2011,
#3
Well what I'm asking is how should I go about EQing. I can play the instruments fine enough but ive been told to pan one track to the left and all this other stuff ect I just don't know where to even get started. What should I be looking for in an eq. Is their a guide that can help me?
#4
Quote by ibugppl
Well what I'm asking is how should I go about EQing. I can play the instruments fine enough but ive been told to pan one track to the left and all this other stuff ect I just don't know where to even get started. What should I be looking for in an eq. Is their a guide that can help me?


Double tracking is mainly use for the rhythm part. Record once in time, then pan that track to one side (I usually do 100%, others like different things). Then you record the part again, and pan it the same percentage to the other side. Do not just copy paste the part however, because this doesn't have the same effect as recording twice.

And any EQ will do it for now. Check out the ReaEQ that comes with reaper, play with the bands.

There are many guides, but you'll have to google search them because most are in different forums, which I'm not allowed to link (I think).
#5
Quote by Meelad360
Double tracking is mainly use for the rhythm part. Record once in time, then pan that track to one side (I usually do 100%, others like different things). Then you record the part again, and pan it the same percentage to the other side. Do not just copy paste the part however, because this doesn't have the same effect as recording twice.

And any EQ will do it for now. Check out the ReaEQ that comes with reaper, play with the bands.

There are many guides, but you'll have to google search them because most are in different forums, which I'm not allowed to link (I think).

You can link. As for the double tracking I will try that. It sounds like it will give an interesting sound.
#6
Quote by ibugppl
Well what I'm asking is how should I go about EQing. I can play the instruments fine enough but ive been told to pan one track to the left and all this other stuff ect I just don't know where to even get started. What should I be looking for in an eq. Is their a guide that can help me?
there's plenty of guides. just search. you'll probably find something.

for panning, some of the basics (though there are no rules.) would be to leave the bass, melody, and beat-holding parts of the drums down the center while the cymbals and whatnot would be scattered around to the sides. Your rhythm guitar(s) should be panned to the sides as well.
#7
Quote by ibugppl
You can link. As for the double tracking I will try that. It sounds like it will give an interesting sound.


I sent you a message with a link in it. Check that out for guitars. But keep in mind that settings from one song most likely won't work on another. I read once from a very smart man "Don't put stock in presets". Put stock in your ears.

But yeah, I'd say pan the drums the way a usual drumset is (i.e. kick drum and snare down the middle, toms, cymbals, and any aux could be panned differently).
#8
This is my favorite EQ guide, not sure where its from but it cover the whole range, not just guitar:

50hz -
Increase to add more fullness to lowest frequency instruments like bass drums, toms, and the bass. Reduce to decrease the boominess of the bass and will increase overtones and the recognition of bass line in the mix. This is most often used on loud bass lines like rock.
100hz -
Increase to add a harder bass sound to lowest frequency instruments.
Increase to add warmth to piano and horns.
Reduce to remove boom on guitars & increase clarity.
200hz -
Increase to add fullness to vocals. Increase to add fullness to snare and guitar
Reduce to decrease muddiness of vocals or mid-range instruments.
Reduce to decrease gong sound of cymbals.
400hz -
Increase to add clarity to bass lines especially when speakers are at low volume.
Reduce to decrease boxy sound of lower drums like bass drums and toms.
800hz -
Increase for clarity and "punch" of bass.
Reduce to remove "cheap" sound of guitars.
1.5Khz-
Increase for clearer, cleaner bass.
Reduce to remove dullness of guitars.
3Khz -
Increase for more attack of guitars.
Increase for more attack on low piano parts.
Increase for more clarity on voice.
Increase for more attack on the snare or other drums.
Reduce to increase breathy, soft sound on background vocals.
Reduce to disguise out-of-tune vocals and guitars.
5Khz -
Increase for vocal presence.
Increase low frequency drum attack.
Increase attack of piano, acoustic guitar and brightness on guitars.
Reduce to soften thin or tinny guitar
7Khz -
Increase to add attack to percussion instruments.
Reduce to decrease sibilance or that annoying ssss sound on singers.
10Khz -
Increase to brighten vocals.
Increase for slight brightness in acoustic guitar and piano.
Increase for hardness on cymbals.
Reduce also to reduce sibilance
15Khz-
Increase this will pretty much brighten anything, but use sparingly as hiss and other nasties are here.
Overview
When a Q control is available, play with it to see what widths will give you the best results.
Remember, these are just general starting points, and by all means do not overdo it!
It is always better to cut to achieve the results you are after.
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#10
+1 on all the EQing stuff. that is all very much right.

I'd just like to add, the best way to find a "bad" frequency is just cutting and boosting until you find the right one. I'd also like to suggest reading over this:

http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/2LqfPd/badmuckingfastard.com/sound/slipperman.html

it is one of the best guitar recording guides out there. you'll outgrow it eventually, but its all very good base info.
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#11
Thanks for all the info. Il get recording in the next day or two and see what I can come up with.