#1
I have a fender jazz bass, around 2008 if that matters, that I had put down for a while and recently started playing again. On the D and G strings' 6th and 7th fret, I noticed a considerable drop in sustain from elsewhere on the fretboard. The note rings out for about two seconds and then sharply fades out leaving a high pitched ring in its place. What are possible causes/solutions to this?

In the time I stopped playing, the bass wasn't in a very good place and some gunk has built up around the pickups. What's the best way to go about cleaning this area? I'm worried about getting water/cleaner down into the electronics.

Thanks in advance
#2
A shot in the dark, but:

Hmm, maybe check the action on it? It might be a little too low, so when you're hitting that note, the string is vibrating and then very lightly hitting the others frets (which could very well cause the high pitch ringing)

Again, just sort of a stab at what it could be.
Yeah, uh-huh...that's what they all say.
#3
Sounds like you have a dead spot or two on your neck. Its not uncommon at all on wood-necked instruments, the only basses that can guaranteed to be 100% dead spot free are graphite instruments (for example Steinberger or Status).
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#4
Quote by Tostitos
Sounds like you have a dead spot or two on your neck. Its not uncommon at all on wood-necked instruments, the only basses that can guaranteed to be 100% dead spot free are graphite instruments (for example Steinberger or Status).


Is there any way to fix it, short of getting a new neck?
#5
Its hard to say for sure, some basses always have a dead spot somewhere, but its not always significantly noticeable. Often dead spots will appear if a neck has been exposed to a rapid temperature and/or humidity shift.

Give your bass a good proper set up, or take it to a shop or tech. And make sure you keep your bass in a place where the humidity won't rapidly change.
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