#1
Setting the Intonation is the process of changing the scale of a guitar by adjusting the string length, and is most commonly done at the bridge. We do this be comparing the note of each open string with that when played at the 12th fret. This is the halfway point along the string, and the note played at the 12th fret is one octave higher than that played on the open string.

In a perfect world we could simply measure the exact length from the open position ‘nut’ to the 12th fret and double it to find the optimum bridge position, and if the strings were very, very thin this might to true, but normally, the length increases with the string gauge.

To do this adjustment very accurately, download the free instrument tuner software ‘Tuner12.exe” from the website link removed. Which gives shows the played note in both frequency and musical note in percentage flat or sharp. The guitar should be plugged into the computer microphone port. One string at a time tune the string in the open position and then check the tune at the 12th fret. If the reading at the 12th fret is sharp the string length should be shortened at the bridge, or lengthened if flat, and the process of tuning in the open position and checking at the 12th fret repeated. After finding the best possible adjustment you can also confirm this by checking the accuracy of notes played at other frets.
#3
Can't you just use a proper tuner instead of some .exe that's posted on some website? It'd be way safer.

And alot more accurate. Unless you have a soundcard and you hook your guitar up with a instrument cable

So yeah, imma join the guy above me and report this.
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Quote by Delboyuk_01
I don't think you can go wrong with a Black guitar, white ones are almost as good but black ones are better, white ones just don't sound quite as good.
#4
Not sure about the link being bad, but this is a good tutorial on intonation. People don't often have access to tuners so software ones are useful. I now tune by ear but i usually used a pedal or handheld tuner.