#1
Searchbar didn't give me any results that really answered my questions, so....

I have my bands' practice space in my basement, and at the moment I'm the only one doing any singing. It's very handy, because I can practice singing through the PA whenever I want. I've only been singing for a couple months now, so I'm still very much a beginner.

1)My main issue that I have is more to do with mic noise than my actual voice... I always seem to get major popping through the PA on "P's" and "B's". I have a foam slip on pop filter that I use, but that only lessens it a little. I've tried putting the mic at different heights and angles, and nothing really seems to stop it. Am I doing something wrong? Even from a foot away the mic still picks up serious pops.

2) When I'm singing it gets very boomy if I get too close. Like, I have to keep the mic at least a foot from my face otherwise nearly everything I sing sounds like the mic is IN my mouth. I see people singing live all the time, and they have the mic right up to their mouth without this issue, so what gives?

I'm using a Carvin M68 mic, which is their answer to the SM58. I plan on getting an SM58 soon and doing a side by side of the two, but that's irrelevant...

When I plug into the PA I tend to set the gain on the PA channel around noon, and adjust the volume until it mixes well with the guitar. Is there a better way of setting it up? Is the gain knob just there to get the levels set when you go between something like a mic and a guitar? I've played guitar for years, and can set up an amp very well, but I haven't had the PA or mics very long, and I'm not sure if maybe I'm just setting something wrong for vocals.

Or maybe I'm just still an uber noob at singing, and am doing it all wrong....

Help?!
Quote by tubetime86
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You finally made it home, draped in the flag that you fell for.
And so it goes
Last edited by jpatan at Apr 1, 2011,
#2
1) Its the velocity of the plosive (the b and p sound). All you need to do is watch it when you start a word with these consonants. Its a technique problem and has little to do with the mic.
2) Proximity effect. Turn the PA down. It sounds like you are overdriving the mic. The gain doesn't need to be super high.
#3
I'll have to play around with the gain knob. I had a feeling it may have something to do with that. Thanks.

Quote by tubetime86
He's obviously pretty young, and I'd guess he's being raised by wolves, or at least humans with the intellectual capacity and compassion of wolves.


You finally made it home, draped in the flag that you fell for.
And so it goes
#4
It sounds to me like you might just need to back away from the mic a little - that should reduce the proximity effect (that low 'boom' kind of sound) and the amount of air being blown into the mic (the plosives). Perhaps direct your voice slightly away from the mic too.
#5
Can you eq the vox channel? Our last singer (male, very low voice) we had to not only use our mixer's low cut button, but dialed almost ALL of the low freq out.

Our current singer (female, much sweeter mids and highs) gets eq'd with a medium amount of low freq, but still with the low cut active to keep the booming at bay. She uses an SM58 and a foam screen, and has pretty much eliminated plosives. But she also does not have a raging attack when she sings.
#6
Yeah, I pretty much got it figured out. It was mainly the gain on that channel being way too high. I turned it way down and adjusted the EQ, and now it's MUCH better. I even took the foam pop filter off, and there's hardly any plosives anymore.

Thanks for all the tips everyone.

Quote by tubetime86
He's obviously pretty young, and I'd guess he's being raised by wolves, or at least humans with the intellectual capacity and compassion of wolves.


You finally made it home, draped in the flag that you fell for.
And so it goes