#1
Why is it that you can solo over a seventh chord (im reffering to the one made of the 1st, major 3rd, 5th, and minor 7th) using a minor scale even though it has a major 3rd?

Thx.
#3
The major scale has the same pattern of whole and half steps as the minor scale.

A minor is the relative minor of C major and the both have G7. The V chord in major and the VII chord in minor. If you are using harmonic minor it is also V
Last edited by d1sturbed4eva at Apr 1, 2011,
#4
Quote by d1sturbed4eva
The major scale has the same pattern of whole and half steps as the minor scale.

A minor is the parallel minor of C major and the both have G7. The V chord in major and the VII chord in minor. If you are using harmonic minor it is also V


This. Except you're referring to the "relative minor" not parallel.
#6
Quote by jkielq91
the dominant 7 chord, which you are referring to is neither major nor minor, because even though the 3rd is major, the 7th is minor. Its kind of neutral.
Dominant seventh chords are absolutely major, just as mmaj7 chords are definitely minor. You classify chords as major/minor/augmented/diminished based on their base triad (1 3 5), the other notes are essentially just tensions.

TS, you're thinking of the blues thing, where you can use the minor pentatonic over a I7 IV7 V7 progression. This is because if you take the 1 and b7 of each chord, it forms the minor pentatonic scale. In C, the I7 has a C and a Bb, the IV7 has an F and an Eb, and the V7 has G and F. Put these together and you have C Eb F G Bb.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Apr 1, 2011,