#1
ok guys so next year when i start highschool im gonna audition for jazz band . And the thing is i know nothing about the jazz playing style except that theres alot of tempo changes during songs . Jazz is uncharted territory for me but im a pretty good guitarist at blues,rock and such. So Guys give me advice and tips for me to work on over the summer so i can prepare.

I must note that im currently learning how to read sheet music and im in advanced music theory guitar lessons if thats what you want to call them .. So guys help me out
"L'etat C'est Moi"
2010 Ltd.Gibson SG Standard 60's
Steinberger Spirit Deluxe
Roland CUBE 80XL
Fender Mim Stratocaster
Fender CD60CE Acoustic
#3
Quote by Sean0913
Learn your guitar really well, start on ii V I.

If the key changes know how to respond to it. Jazz playing is not for the musically weak. It will expose you faster than any genre I know.

Best,

Sean



Thanks man , Can you throw out a link to a website or video that can help GRASP the idea of jazz style

thanks'

Stone
"L'etat C'est Moi"
2010 Ltd.Gibson SG Standard 60's
Steinberger Spirit Deluxe
Roland CUBE 80XL
Fender Mim Stratocaster
Fender CD60CE Acoustic
#4
Well, being in a Jazz band, know the basic Major, Minor, and Dominant chords. This also Major 7th and Minor 7th. Whether they be barre chords or whatever, know them. Also be comfortable improvising over basic progressions. Being in a Jazz Band as a guitarist, you will most likely be in the rhythm section (you will be). Parts you will be asked to play will look like stuff like this F13 (#11) or Eb/Fmin 7 (sounds horrible I know). This is a basic outline of the chords the whole band is playing. Instead of playing the whole chord, (some of the notes clash horribly with notes the band is playing) play it as Dominant, Major or Minor. Stick to that unless your director says different.
#5
Also, learn to mix well with the rest of the rhythm section. The sheet will often want you to play straight quarter notes. While this is preferable for Count Basie, (the guitarist was known for "chunky" rhythm) find something that works with the drums. Do muted strums when the drummer hits the high-hat, or incorporate the bass line into your chord progressions. Find something that you AND your director like. =)
Last edited by xxDROXxx at Apr 2, 2011,
#7
Learn the melody, chord progression/form, and soloing technique for the following songs: perdido, so what, Lester leaps in, tenor madness, and equinox. This will give you an understanding of playing over a ii V I progression, modal jazz, major and minor blues, rhythm changes, and the dominant cycle bridge.
The best way to predict the future is to invent it.
-Alan Kay

Check out my original classical composition here !
#9
Jazz players often follow chord progression exact by using arpeggios over them, like a major arpeggio over a major chord. this makes it a lot easier to deal with those key changes.

On this site if you go to the section 'jazzing up your blues' it gives you a great starting platform to build on.

http://www.justinguitar.com/en/JA-000-Jazz.php

and there is plenty more stuff to work on there to.

Have fun =)
#10
Quote by Lilttle Angus
ok guys so next year when i start highschool im gonna audition for jazz band . And the thing is i know nothing about the jazz playing style except that theres alot of tempo changes during songs . Jazz is uncharted territory for me but im a pretty good guitarist at blues,rock and such. So Guys give me advice and tips for me to work on over the summer so i can prepare.

I must note that im currently learning how to read sheet music and im in advanced music theory guitar lessons if thats what you want to call them .. So guys help me out


The thing you're really going to need is the ability to read through the music. Generally it's going to be chords, very little melody playing. If you can get ahold of some of the charts from the instructor that would be a great thing to practice. if not, Id suggest getting a real book... and a teacher.
shred is gaudy music
#11
Quote by jayx124
You should probably learn jazz chords and extensions (tensions) and work primary on comping. hear as many of the classic jazz standards as you possibly can.
This is great advice. If you're going to be in a high school jazz band, you're going to be mostly comping. It's not necessarily all that difficult, but if you can't build a voicing of a G7#5b9 right off the top of your head, you might get lost pretty quickly.

As for rhythm, any jazz musician NEEDS to understand syncopation and swing. You said you play blues, so I assume you're familiar with swing in the form of a shuffle or something similar. That's a good start.

What it really takes to understand these two things is to really listen to jazz, and actively take note of the articulations and rhythmic styling.

Quote by GuitarMunky
The thing you're really going to need is the ability to read through the music. Generally it's going to be chords, very little melody playing. If you can get ahold of some of the charts from the instructor that would be a great thing to practice. if not, Id suggest getting a real book... and a teacher.
Yeah the Real Book (or any fake book for that matter) is a great tool for any jazz musician.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#12
listen to jazz all summer.
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#13
Quote by food1010
This is great advice. If you're going to be in a high school jazz band, you're going to be mostly comping. It's not necessarily all that difficult, but if you can't build a voicing of a G7#5b9 right off the top of your head, you might get lost pretty quickly.


chord construction theory is a very important tool. also, being able to come up with chord inversions often makes life easier for smoother voice movement when playing chords, no matter how complex the chord names may seem.

too, you don't have to play full chords, in fact I would discourage it because whatever chord a guitarist has in his score is elsewhere in the band (and it's also more unnecessary notes to play especially for fats songs): the bass will have to root, the piano also does chords a lot and the band will have parts of what chord you're playing in their parts too. of course, this doesn't mean that a guitarist's role in a jazz band is unimportant, far from it - it adds extra color to the music. just remember that you don't always have to play the root of the chord (i never do anymore), the 3rd and 5th are always important however, and if it is a 9th chord include the 9th, if it is a 13th chord include the 13th.

it also helps to be creative sometimes. i'm in the school jazz band and in a funk piece that we are playing all i have in my part are 7th chords. i replaced them with 9th and 13th chords because 7th chords are boring to play all the time and it also makes the piece a little more interesting to listen too (if not for myself to play)

for when I improvise in jazz, passing notes that wouldn't usually "fit" and chromatics all of a sudden become my best friend.
#15
too, you don't have to play full chords, in fact I would discourage it because whatever chord a guitarist has in his score is elsewhere in the band (and it's also more unnecessary notes to play especially for fats songs): the bass will have to root, the piano also does chords a lot and the band will have parts of what chord you're playing in their parts too. of course, this doesn't mean that a guitarist's role in a jazz band is unimportant, far from it - it adds extra color to the music. just remember that you don't always have to play the root of the chord (i never do anymore), the 3rd and 5th are always important however, and if it is a 9th chord include the 9th, if it is a 13th chord include the 13th.


agreed to a point, that point being fifths. unless its a b5 or b13, you really shouldn't worry about it. 3rds and sevenths are the name of the game, 9ths and 13ths can be avoided in swing charts, but in funk or latin charts (where the guitar is a bit more prominant) should be played. likewise, any time where your comping and the piano player isn't, you'll want to play those extensions (you can also use roots and fifths in this situation).
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#16
Quote by griffRG7321
^ 5ths aren't important, unless it's altered.
Yep. Your most important tones are the 3, 7, upper extension, and any alterations.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#17
Basic E string chord shapes

[B]--|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|
--|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|
--|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|
--|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|
--|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|
--|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|
 maj7    min7     dom7   dim     m7b5[/B]



Basic A string chord shapes

[B]-|-|-|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|
-|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|
-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|
-|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|
-|-|o|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|
-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|
   maj7     min7         7       9      dim     m7b5[/B]



These should be all you need to get started, to be honest. I'm not sure what kind of songs a high school jazz band is going to be playing, but my gut tells me that they aren't going to be using a large amount of altered chords right off the bat. Your biggest problem is going to be getting familiar with all these chord shapes (and I mean all of them - i only gave the absolutely essential chords that you should know like the back of your hand) and learning to comp through various progressions without getting behind. Getting a Real Book is a good idea, but it's not going to be any help if you aren't familiar with any of the songs in it. I suggest getting at least one greatest hits album from Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Count Basie, Dizzy Gillespie, and Duke Ellington so that you can find some good songs to start comping to. I'd also suggest getting Kind of Blue by Miles Davis, as it's probably the best album for getting used to the "odd" sound of jazz solos while still enjoying what you hear. Although you won't be soloing much, I'd still suggest listening to Django Reinhardt, Wes Montgomery, Charlie Christian, and Joe Pass, as they're all great jazz guitarists that can give you an idea of how the guitar can sound in a jazz context. They're all very different, so listen to them all.


Now, as far as altered chords are concerned, it's best to think of them in terms of the shapes they're derived from. In other words, take your basic 7 chord shape and just alter the 5 or 9 by raising or lowering it. Don't try and remember a whole new picture for an A7#5 chord and another one for an A7b5 and then another one for an A7#5#9, etc. You won't use these chords often enough to remember them that way, and it's much easier to just figure out the nuts and bolts behind how they're formed. For example:

E string altered shapes
[B]-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|
-|-|-|o|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|o|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|-|
-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|
-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|
-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|
-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|
 7#5      7b5     maj7#5   maj7b5[/B]


notice that the b string note is the 5th of the E string note on the same fret. Thus, you can always raise or lower the b string note to raise or flat your fifths when you're using an E string chord shape. The 9s can be a bit trickier with E string chords, however, so you have to go about them a bit differently:

Altered 9s

[B]-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|o|-
-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|-|o|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|-
-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-
-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-
-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-
-|-|x|-|-|-|x|-|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|x|-|-|-|x|-|-|-|-
  7b9       7#9     7#5b9   7b5b9    7#5#9[/B]


Now these chords are all still built on the E string root position, but you have to omit the bass note in order to get all the altered tones in (except with the 7b5b9). If these all seem like odd shapes, just remember that the triangle/diamond shape that makes up the top three notes of an E string 7 chord are the foundation for all of these. You're simply taking those three notes and raising and lowering the b string note (the fifth), and then adding another note on the high e string for the altered 9 notes. Just remember - b string for your 5's, e string for your 9's.

A string altered chords

[B]-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|
-|o|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|
-|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|
-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|
-|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|o|-|-|o|-|-|-|-|-|x|-|-|x|-|-|-|-|x|-|-|-|
-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|-|
  7b9   7#9    9#5  #5#9        9b5      b5#9     #5b9            
[/B]


Basically the same principle, just taking the basic 9 chord shape and raising and lowering some notes, dropping the root when necessary to finger all the extensions. With A string chords, the b string is going to be the 9 that you have to raise and lower, and the high e string will be used for the altered 5 notes. Try and get that image in your head so that you aren't trying to work out what note is on what string every time you need to alter a chord. Remember - with A string chords, the b string is your 9's, and the e string is your 5's. In any case, most of these are rarely used in jazz standards. Find a book or website with a log of all these basic jazz chords so that you can reference the voicings if need be, but spend most of your time getting the basic major, minor, dominant, and diminished shapes down really well. Play some nice Duke Ellington tunes like Don't Get Around Much Anymore and I'm Beginning to See the Light to start seeing what's going to be required of you at the most basic level. If you want to see what some faster comping is going to be like, try playing Dizzy Atmosphere by Dizzy Gillespie. His stuff is also great for learning to comp to some different latin and afro-cuban rhythms so you aren't just swinging all the time. Anyway, I'm pretty sure that all those songs are in the Realbook, so you should look into getting one of those. The most important thing, however, is to begin listening to some jazz. Look into the artists I mentioned - they're all legends of American music. You'd be doing your country a disservice not to listen to them! Good luck, and here's hoping you become a fan of jazz.
Last edited by Glen'sHeroicAct at Apr 3, 2011,
#18
In my Jazz band, we play a lot of Blues, Funk, Jazz (of course), and some Rock. We have songs like "It Don't Mean A Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing)," "Domino," "Superstition," "What a Wonderful World," And "Don't Stop Believing." We have tons more but those are probably the highlights.

When I went into Jazz Band, I played nothing but Death Metal. But now I learned about 7th chords, 9th chords, and tons more. You should try to learn those types of chords.
#19
I bought a book a couple weeks ago called
"Mickey bakers jazz guitar book"
It's really good so far and I have learned a lot from it.
Quote by kaptkegan
Don't think I've ever been sigged.


I pretty much never leave the drug thread anymore.
#20
I bought a book a couple weeks ago called "Mickey bakers jazz guitar book" It's really good so far and I have learned a lot from it.


agreed a lot. its stylistically antiquated (but then again, so is high school jazz band), but gives you a GREAT foundation.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)