#1
i've never had any real lessons on any instruments other than drums and percussion. one day i learned the blues scale and just...****ed around i guess, and it didnt sound good but it didnt sound too bad either. then i stated leaning more theory, figured out how things worked, and somewhere along the line solos just kinda happened (i usually try to keep a solo in one key with some chromatics and whatnot thrown in for flavor, nothing too fancy, except for those occassions where the song calls for fanciness and i just get in the zone).

so now i'm teaching a few people the basics of music, giving some friends a proper starting point. i see too many douchebags around who dont know crap about music and try to criticize good songwriting and i want to prevent this as much as i can. for example i played a song for the guitar class i'm in, and at least 2 people now think i dont know how to play guitar. 1 guy said, in these words, "you were in like 3 different keys and you obviously made up a few chords," in an attempt to tell me i dont know what im doing...this dude doesn't even know how basic triads are formed, he just knows shapes and mindlessly follows them...but i'm getting very far away from my point haha, i'm just trying to teach a few people the basics in a way that allows them to study further without running into contradictions or confusions.

so my friends i've been teaching have gotten to the point where they have good technique on their instruments, an understanding of how chords are formed and of scales and how to create chord progressions for different songs of some different styles. i've even managed to pass on some jazz and get them interested in learning that further (from a real teacher who really knows jazz haha). but i think instead of pushing them harmonically to get to this point where they can understand and create good, sometimes fairly complex chord progressions, i probably should've stuck with the really simple hamonic stuff for a while and got them into more melodic work. i have 1 student who can write geat melodies ahead of time but she's kind of stumped wen it comes to improv. and the rest just don't really get melodic stuff unless its appegio-related. as an experiment, i talk one of them to write songs on guitar using embellished bar chords in fingerstyle so it kind of sounds melodic. i think before they can invest in really becoming musicians, learning from more experienced people in more formal ways, and playing with other people, they should be able to improvise around a little when given a simple chord progression. but i guess i never properly learned how to solo, it just started coming out of my instruments, so idk what to teach them! "yeah, just do what i did, screw aound with a scale for months until your ears wrk with them, then just solo" that's basically all i can tell them and i feel like some sort of false-advertising jerk if i can't even get one of them to be able to write or improvise a simple solo...

i know they have the hands for it. i've taught them enough songs to where they've got at least decent dexterity. have i done all i can, do i just have to wait and have them practice scales until it kinda just happens, like it did for me? or i there some kinda secret i missed when i was going thru this, in which case knowing would probly improve my own soloing too haha?
#2
well just have them learn some solos they like and have them analaize it and learn the licks they like and try to have them incorporate it into their playing

also teach them some scales and have them imporv over some bakcing tracks

but just having them screw around witht he scales til something comes out is how i learned
#4
to be honest, I only properly learned the pentatonic scale, yet with time and memorization, I can solo in major, minor keys as well as some modes like Dorian and Phrygian, I now know theory, but I learned it a bit to late and could never apply it to the guitar. My point is that I learned how to solo based on memorizing certain patterns instead of scales

it worked out for me and the plus size is that I can play in pitch black darkness with no issue, I learned through sound and not sight
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#5
Quote by supersac
well just have them learn some solos they like and have them analaize it and learn the licks they like and try to have them incorporate it into their playing

also teach them some scales and have them imporv over some bakcing tracks

but just having them screw around witht he scales til something comes out is how i learned

this helps, i've taught them solos but never thought to teach them specific licks to incorporate into original solos. this would help my own soloing a lot too, i only know licks that came about thru me messing around with scales, i dont know any1 else's licks or licks common in certain styles. i've focused much more on drums and on songwriting in my learning so these little things lead guitarists keep in their toolbag have escaped me, i'll have to look back into this and kinda rethink what i do. i think by teaching them whole solos they viewed solos as monsters, rather than being made up simply of notes, these big monster solos seem easier when broken down into licks that you can have more fun messing around with.
#6
That's why being a good guitarist doesn't automatically mean you'll be a good teacher - just figuring out how you've done something can be hard, figuring out how to explain it to someone else is even harder.
Actually called Mark!

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#7
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That's why being a good guitarist doesn't automatically mean you'll be a good teacher - just figuring out how you've done something can be hard, figuring out how to explain it to someone else is even harder.

know watcha mean, i try my hardest not to false-advertise, i teach my friends for free, and if any1 else wanted me to teach them it'd be very cheap, i'd only charge a lot if i thought i could teach very well haha and i always tell students they cant expect me to know everything cuz i've only been playing guitar, piano, and bass for a year and drumming with bad technique for 3
#8
You'll be able to do it, you just need to spend a little time re-analysing your own technique and getting it all organised in your head.
Actually called Mark!

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#9
I agree with seagull, you should work out the correct paths to the goals of your teaching. Improvising is really hard you need to have a good grasp of rhythm and phrasing, you need to have a good vocabulary so you can tell an interesting story, you need a good technique so you can carry it out, you need to listen to a lot of music so you can anticipate what will come ahead. Figure out in points what you did to get there and then take the essentials and pass them to your students.