#1
anyone know of any company other than Peavey that does this...was just jamming on a buddy Generation EXP tele model and noted the quick, laminated fretboard. Same finish as neck, but why do they do this?
Quote by Pan-Tallica
Quote by jrcsgtpeppers
But theres no reason why i cant be free like a raspberry stuck to the back of a horny elephants ass.

This is maybe the worst comparison in the history of comparisons.
#2
Hagstrom?
Stuff:
ESP/LTD EC-200QM (with SD Distortions)
1986 Charvel Model 4
2013 Ibanez RG7421WH

Amps
Marshall MS-2 microamp (a POS)
B-52 LG-100a head (Not bad)

Pedals
Digitech Grunge distortion
#4
Well I'm not sure if they laminate it, but Washburn did a series; the HM, with carbon/glass/epoxy fretboards - I imagine it'd have a similar feel. With that in mind, I'd say for smoothness and speed - although laminate will wear off and eventually become sticky and uncomfortable.
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Gear:

Guitar(s): .Shecter Tempest EXTREMEEEEEE
--------------Maton CW-80

Amplification: Randall RG75 G3
#5
Using laminate wood improves strength to combat the effect changes in season have on a guitar and you can ensure you have a nice piece of wood on show. Problem is it tends to mute your tone and sustain a bit. That's why most companies don't do it. When people want an all-maple neck they usually want that full, bright maple tone and using four or five layers glued together chops some of that off.
#6
Yeah, I noticed that his sustain absolutly sucked. I just noticed how low his action was, due to the med frets. It was incredibly easy to play though, even with the D neck. It appeared as though the Neck and fretboard were part of the same wood, just a very thin cut line to show that they were seperated to make room for the trussrod.
Quote by Pan-Tallica
Quote by jrcsgtpeppers
But theres no reason why i cant be free like a raspberry stuck to the back of a horny elephants ass.

This is maybe the worst comparison in the history of comparisons.