#1
I have about $150 right now and when I get paid on Friday I will probably get $200 so I'll have around $350. I don't know much about amps, but I know that tube amps sound a lot nicer, right?

So if someone could maybe give me a good tube amp that's around that price(or cheaper if possible cause that would be awesome). There used to be a B-52 that Guitar Center was selling a year or so ago that was $350 and people said it was really nice but I think I clicked on it once since I had the link saved and it said they don't sell it anymore.
#2
I don't mean to come off as rude, but you don't seem to know too much about amps.

If this is true, I'd get a modeller just so you figure out exactly what you want.

You could check out the peavey vypyr, vox valtronix, or roland cube 30x, all great sounding modellers which will definately be under $300
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#3
I have about $150 right now and when I get paid on Friday I will probably get $200 so I'll have around $350. I don't know much about amps, but I know that tube amps sound a lot nicer, right?


Obviously you didn't read my post.

Anyways what is a modeller?
#4
A modeller is a solid state amp with a bunch of digital effects, such as many types of distortion, flanger, chorus, etc built in.

Many people agree that tube amps will sound a lot better (in fact pretty much everyone does, but that doesn't mean solid state sounds awful).
#5
Well I don't really need something with built in effects, I have a Zoom G1(which is basically a cheap pedal with several effects), although if I did have it built in I'd probably use that instead since it's more convenient. But I might go out and buy a nicer pedal when I have a little more cash.

But anyways I've seen a lot of tube amps and they sound way better than any solid state amp, by far, which is why I'd rather have one of those.
#6
Quote by apwhitelaw
Obviously you didn't read my post.

Anyways what is a modeller?


Lol, that is funny... almost as if he wrote that first post as a joke.
#8
I have heard quite a few good things about the B-52. They can hold 70,000 pounds of bombs...
I believe the Peavey Valveking is somewhere around 300 dollars.
..I was watching my death.
#9
A great solid state amp in your price range is the Fender Mustang I, II, or III. I'd go with the III. Don't know what you play, so depending on your genre, it might not be for you.

There are some tube amps around your price range, but I wouldn't piddle with them; I haven't been impressed with any tubes under $600. I'd stay away from B-52; lots of reliability issues, not worth the modest savings. The hybrid amps that have 1 tube in the power section (like the Vox VT, some of the Vypyrs, etc) don't really offer much. IMHO, unless you just want loud, then the pre-amp side is where you really benefit from the tubes. A tube in the power stage just makes it louder, but won't break up (start to sound really good) until it gets super loud.

Maybe the best thing to do is save another couple hundred and just get a Line 6 HD400 or HD500 pedal. Having effects built into the amp is fairly useless unless you can control them with a pedal. The Vypyr and some Line 6 amps have pretty decent remotes, but that'll run you $200 extra for a good one. The HDs do it all, then you can pump it through whatever amp you already have, go directly into a PA, or even turn off the amp/cabinet modeling and run it through a high-quality tube rig later on.

I have a Marshall JVM-410h half-stack, but I usually play it through a Digitech GNX4 pedal for the extra versatility. It's good enough for me for stomp box models, reverb, filters, and Whammy, but its wah, delays, chorus, vibrato, and tremolo models really suck. The HD series is much better and represents the current state of the art out of the sub $500 class.
#11
Quote by timbit2006
I have heard quite a few good things about the B-52. They can hold 70,000 pounds of bombs...



LOL! That'll cost more than $300!
#12
I play mostly rock and alternative rock. I don't need anything loud, I just need something that sounds nice. I'm still playing on an amp that gets radio interference. The one in the little combo package with the fender guitar. No lie. The distortion sounds like an earthquake. Worst amp I've ever used.

And jetwash, is the Line 6 HD400/500 worth the price? I'd probably go with the $400 if I even considered it, but $400 is a lot.
Last edited by apwhitelaw at Apr 3, 2011,
#13
Quote by jetwash69
LOL! That'll cost more than $300!


B-52 is such a creative name for a company...

EDIT:
You're going to get radio on your amp even with a different one. It's just the way it is.
..I was watching my death.
Last edited by timbit2006 at Apr 3, 2011,
#14
Well, I figured that, but I only get radio when I use the little distortion button that it has, and I rarely use that because I have a multieffect pedal and I use the distortion on that. That doesn't pick up any radio.
#15
Quote by megano28
I don't mean to come off as rude, but you don't seem to know too much about amps.

If this is true, I'd get a modeller just so you figure out exactly what you want.

You could check out the peavey vypyr, vox valtronix, or roland cube 30x, all great sounding modellers which will definately be under $300


+1 on the Vox valvetronix the VT20+ is a great starter amp. One that you won't out grow for at least a couple of years. It is loud enough for jamming and small gigs.

EDIT:

With regard to the zoom you have it's not even close to what a modeler can do in helping you explore and define your own sound.

Hooking that zoom into tube amp would sound like rubbish. Not to come off like a hater but that zoom is a cheap multi effects pedal. It would kill the tube tone so fast it would make your head spin.

Best to get a Peavy Vypyr, Vox Valvetronix or Roland cube.

This will help you decide what kind of tube amp you want before you buy it

Getting into a tube amp without knowing what you're looking for tone wise can become a very expensive mistake.

Without getting overly technical a Peavy 6505 is a very different sounding amps than a Fender 65 twin

Those are just two examples if you want the tone of the Fender it would be silly to buy the Peavy or vice versa.
Gear
Jackson DK2
Ibanez RGR320EX
Guild X82 Nova
Godin Seagull S6

Vox V847
Vox VT40+ / VFS5 VT


Quote by FatalGear41

Right now, there are six and a half billion people on earth who don't care what kind of tubes you have in your amplifier
Last edited by Willowthewitch at Apr 3, 2011,
#16
Check out the Jet City JCA2112 combo if you want a tube amp.
Warning: The above post may contain lethal levels of radiation, sharp objects and sexiness.
Proceed with extreme caution!
#17
Quote by Willowthewitch
+1 on the Vox valvetronix the VT20+ is a great starter amp that you won't out grow for at least a couple of years. It is loud enough for jamming and small gigs.

With regard to the preavy Vypyr 30 IMHO it has a much steeper learning curve than the Vox or Roland.


That one is only $170. Will it sound nice for just playing at home and such? Like I said, I don't need it to be very loud.
#18
Where do you live whitelaw? Also, when you say rock/alternative what type of bands do you like in that genre. There are tons, and it would help us if you'd be as specific as possible. If you're vigilant you can find better amps than a new vt, cube, or vypyr. If you camp craigslist you could find some really nice amps around $300. A traynor ycv20 at that price would be about as good as you'll find, and it's not an amp that you'll outgrow as long as you keep playing in the rock/alternative genre.
#19
Oh, yeah, they're worth it. And the HD500 has so many more controls on it, which makes it way more versatile, easier to use, and allow you to get it to perform for you quicker. It's worth the extra $100 for that alone, even if you don't use its other features. Personally, I'd wait 6 months more to get that kind of versatility if that's what it took to raise an extra $100.

I've played my Digitech pedals through a Marshall MS-2 before, and it sounded better than my Marshall MG30DFX on its own. Those pedals made the MG bearable for a while, but for a long time I preferred to just plug the pedal into a keyboard amp. Now I usually play (solo practice through a Digitech RP355 plugged into a 5 watt Vox DA5 (set to .5 watts). Or band practice through the GNX4 through the JVM. On lots of gigs I'll take the JVM and run it directly into the 10" speaker in MG. totally bypassing the built-in amp (disconnected that from the speaker). Lots of small venues don't have room for the 4x12 cabinet, and the MG speaker sounds a million times better when driven by a decent tube amp. I just won't turn the volume past 3 so I don't blow out the 30 watt speaker with the 100 watt head. But really, I haven't had to have it louder than 2 to overpower accoustic drums, and even that was too loud for some venues.

If I were you, I'd save up for the HD500, then save up for a powered wedge monitor to play it through like this: http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/Kustom-KPC12MP-12-Powered-Monitor-Speaker?sku=485594

Just got one of these for the drummer/singer for venues that don't already have stage monitors. Works great, and has multiple uses--very versatile. Of course, you can't just plug your guitar or a vocal mic directly into it--need some type of pre-amp. The HD500 will work quite nicely for that.

VOX discontinued the DA5. I haven't checked out the replacement yet. Although the Roland cubes and microcubes are quite popular, and I'm a Roland guy for pianos and drums, I wouldn't recommend any of their amps or monitors. The cubes just don't have the kind of bottom end that VOX provides at every equivalent model. Also IMHO, Roland is way overpriced.

I'd stay away from all Line 6 amps (even the Spider Valves and the discontinued Flextone series). The Vettas are decent, but they better be for what they cost . The HD500 brings you into Vetta territory for a fraction of the price. You'll just need something to hear it through and a plain powered monitor or a clean guitar amp will both work OK.
#20
Jet City makes some great tube amps, if that's the tone you're looking for. Kinda one trick ponies unless you hook them up to good MFX like an HD500 or a well-stocked pedal board (think $800 - $2000 for total with individual pedals, not counting losses for all the ones you decide you don't like after all).
#21
So your saying I can use something like that monitor you linked and just use the HD500 as a preamp? Seems pretty good.

I usually get around $200 every two weeks, depending on how much I work, so if I really wanna spend my money on this, it will be a couple months until I have enough.
#22
Quote by apwhitelaw
So your saying I can use something like that monitor you linked and just use the HD500 as a preamp? Seems pretty good.

I usually get around $200 every two weeks, depending on how much I work, so if I really wanna spend my money on this, it will be a couple months until I have enough.


Yep. The HD500 is very versatile. And if you do decide to go gigging, as long as the venue has a PA you only need to bring the HD with you and you can plug it right into their PA. If you bought the monitor I linked to, you could bring that to venues without a PA, buy a pole to stand it on, and that can be your PA. If it works like I think it can, you can even plug a mic into the HD500 for vocals (for you or for a separate singer). Then the HD will serve as your pre-amp for the vocal mic. I can do that with my GNX4, and I'm pretty sure you can do that on the HD500, too. But maybe not on the 400, and I'm pretty sure you can't with the 300.

A couple of months feels like a long time, but it's much less time than you'd be stuck with something crappy if you go cheap now. So your looking at sacrificing a few months with the crappy status quo to gain years with pro-worthy gear.
#23
If you get $200 every two weeks, why not figure out what genre(s) you like (3-6 months maybe?) and then buy a real nice amp (maybe new guitar to, if you want to/have the money)? I wish I had a cashflow like that!
Gear:

Guitars:
LTD Viper 100FM
Ibanez RG320PG P2 (For sale*)
Ibanez RGA32 (w/ IronGear pups)
Epiphone Pro-1

Amps:
Vox VT15
or
Vox Tonelab EX
- through -
Peavey KB-300

* = PM me for more details


Quote by Willowthewitch

The actual correct answer
#24
Quote by TuningGamer
If you get $200 every two weeks, why not figure out what genre(s) you like (3-6 months maybe?) and then buy a real nice amp (maybe new guitar to, if you want to/have the money)? I wish I had a cashflow like that!


Yeah I work my ass off.

Right now my schedule is school, work, sleep, rinse and repeat. I don't even have time to use the stuff I'm buying lol.

Okay I'm kidding but really I do work most of the weekend and sometimes during the week.

I was already thinking about getting a new guitar also, but I don't know. Depends how much it's gonna be cause even if I have the cash I don't know if I'll want to spend all my money on it.

Cause lets say I get the HD500, plus an amp which we'll just say $200, thats already at least $700 right there. Then a new guitar? That's gonna be lot of money spending there.

Although its true I do need a new guitar, I have a $100 Dean and also use my brothers Fender that came in one of those little combo packs with the amp. The Fender is better and I like the neck a lot more, so I'll have to go try out some guitars and see what I like.
Last edited by apwhitelaw at Apr 3, 2011,
#26
Quote by apwhitelaw
Yeah I work my ass off.

...
Cause lets say I get the HD500, plus an amp which we'll just say $200, thats already at least $700 right there. Then a new guitar? That's gonna be lot of money spending there.

Although its true I do need a new guitar, I have a $100 Dean and also use my brothers Fender that came in one of those little combo packs with the amp. The Fender is better and I like the neck a lot more, so I'll have to go try out some guitars and see what I like.


OK, so once you get the HD500 you can see if you can live with the "Fender" amp, cause you'll just be using it like a monitor.

If the Fender from the combo pack was a Starcaster, then you probably really do need another guitar. If it's a Squier, then you can take it to a luthier, get a good setup on it (probably around $100) and it'll probably be get you by for a long time. Maybe you'll want to change the pickups, but you'll need to get a custom pickguard made for it if you're going from single coils to humbuckers. Especially if you want a humbucker in the neck. That'll take a little bit of routing, too, since it's not deep enough for the mounts--but you can do that with a Dremel tool--no big deal. Also after 2 of the stock tuners broke I replaced the all with Fender/Schaller locking units like on the American Deluxe Strats. $80 and a little bit of drilling for the pegs. I also put in electronics from the American Deluxe (S-1 switching system) so for a total of around $400 (including the guitar itself, a pro setup, and the mods) and now my Squier is my main practice guitar. I play it more than my MIA strat, a couple of Ibanez shred guitars (including a Prestige) and a Schecter Avenger.

But a Starcaster wouldn't be worth the mods. If you do have a Starcaster, then after the HD500, I'd get another guitar. Depending on what you play, I'd either go with a Squier Standard (as opposed to a Bullet or an Affinity), or with a low-end Ibanez RG.

Squier: http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Squier-Black-and-Chrome-Fat-Strat-Electric-Guitar?sku=511944 This has the specifications of an American Strat, but it's made in the third world, so it's cheaper than a Mexican Strat. But it's better than almost any Mexican Strat in so many important ways.

Ibanez: http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Ibanez-RG350MDX-Electric-Guitar?sku=518871. This is worth the extra money if you're into metal. It's got the equivalent of a Floyd Rose trem, but you have to be really serious before this would be right for you. It takes a long time to change the strings on these, but if you do it right and don't subject the guitar to temperature changes, then you won't have to tune the guitar at all between string changes. The other down side is they have to be set up for specific string gauges and tunings. That's why I have so many Floyd Rose guitars. Ones in standard with 9s, another is in Standard with skinny top/heavy bottom (ST/HB) strings (like 10s for the top 3 and 11s for the bottom 3) and another is Drop D with ST/HBs.

So if you mainly want to play lots of metal, then you may want to start with a 24 fret guitar with a fixed bridge. I can't help with that other than to recommend you shop the local pawnshops and don't buy without bringing someone who really knows what to look for, so you don't get something with a warped neck, a cracked body, bad frets, or missing hard-to-find hardware.

When I got my Schecter at the pawn shop, it didn't have any strings on it and it was missing one of the 6 locking blocks from the trem. No biggie--80 cents for a new locking block from Stew Mac, a set of strings, and about 15 minutes polishing the scratches out of the finish with automotive rubbing compound, and I'd saved about $400 on the guitar.
Last edited by jetwash69 at Apr 3, 2011,