#1
Look at the Am7 three phrases down after the intro riff (Why she had to go...) in this tab: http://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/b/beatles/yesterday_ver5_tab.htm

It is, in all intents, the same fingering as an Am7, just without the root note played. Problem is, in this voicing of the chord, there is no octave, no other A anywhere, so it could not even be labeled as an inversion. It's like, a B with a minor third but augmented fifth (is there even a name for that?)

Does the context make it an A still? Why or why not?
Last edited by inf4nticide at Apr 3, 2011,
#3
You mean the open A is supposed to carry over the D chord after the bottom of the A7 is voiced before it and into the voicing of the Am7?
#4
The root isn't always necessary in a chord. The most important intervals are the third and the seventh. It's definitely an Am7 because of the context.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#6
Quote by Flibo
The root isn't always necessary in a chord. The most important intervals are the third and the seventh. It's definitely an Am7 because of the context.



Why, though? How can you hear the interval off a root if no root is played?
#7
the A before the simutatnous notes, acts as a root essentially. the rest of the notes are C# G and E. Even looking at them without the a, the C# and G is a diminished fifth, a common element in the use of dominant chords. I mean, without context, if you saw C# E and G, youd think C# dim, but a dominant can also fit that trait. A C# E G would be A7. to answer your question, yes, it is an A chord

Edit:


Quote by inf4nticide
Why, though? How can you hear the interval off a root if no root is played?

Generally, bass will pick up the root of the chord. if the bass played A, but the guitar just played C# and G, the overall sound would be A C# and G, which would function together as an A7 chord.

In jazz, chord voicing on guitar gets ridiculous with its extensions. say we had a Cmin11, thatd be C Eb G Bb D and F, all in one chord. Trying to play all the notes together is near impossible, so you opt out to play it on different instruments. Bass can cover the root, guitar sticks to mainly the 3rd, 7th, and highest extension, in this case, 11, and the other instruments can cover whatever is left.

EDIT2::
I should also clear up my phrasing of the Dominant using a diminished 5th. the diminished fifth is present between its 3rd and 7th notes. it doesnt actually contain a diminished fifth toward the chord quality
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Last edited by Zinnie at Apr 3, 2011,
#8
First of all, that's a C not a C charp, and second this tab does not take into account a bass note being played here. It's often played with just one acoustic guitar...
#9
Quote by inf4nticide
First of all, that's a C not a C charp, and second this tab does not take into account a bass note being played here. It's often played with just one acoustic guitar...

so youre saying the 2nd fret of the B string is not C#? 0-B 1-C 2-C#
And I meant in overall music in general, not this exact song.
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#10
No, I'm saying the first fret of the B string is a C. look at the tab again. Maybe you're making the same mistake IFellFromHeaven did, I'm talking about the Am7 two chords after the A7
Last edited by inf4nticide at Apr 3, 2011,
#11
Quote by inf4nticide
No, I'm saying the first fret of the B string is a C. look at the tab again. Maybe you're making the same mistake IFellFromHeaven did, I'm talking about the Am7 two chords after the A7

Okay, my bad. You caught me there. Thought you meant the a7. mkay, lets look. you have Dmin to am7 to Bb. the chord contains the notes F#(I think its really suppose to be E, I never heard the song so maybe im wrong) G C E. If its what the tab is correctly saying, you have F# G C E, which could look like a Cadd#11. Or, if its my case, just a Cmaj triad. Dm C Bb is a common progression in minor, the i VII VI. So you may not be entirely wrong. however, the i v VI is also common, where it could be Dm Am(7) Bb. It all depends on its function. In this case, I can go either way. However, rootless chords are still used throughout music, so don't always count them out.
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#12
Quote by inf4nticide
Why, though? How can you hear the interval off a root if no root is played?

You don't have to. It's not really important what you call chords. You can call it Gsus4add13(no5) and it's still the same chord. You could even simply call that chord a C, it has all the notes of the C major triad. I think it's called Am7 because of the notes that are sung on top of it, but I'm not sure of that.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#13
Quote by Flibo
You don't have to. It's not really important what you call chords. You can call it Gsus4add13(no5) and it's still the same chord. You could even simply call that chord a C, it has all the notes of the C major triad. I think it's called Am7 because of the notes that are sung on top of it, but I'm not sure of that.

Well, you can't really call it what you want, it has to do with the function of the chord, but i'd love seeing someone call it that xDD
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#14
It's a C

Those three quarter notes in the vocal melody at the start of that bar are D E F (had to go).

The chords harmonizing those notes are D C B

There are also string and cello parts in that song. The string mostly mirroring the vocal line with the cello providing something of a bassline, in this particular part a descending run (D C B A).

The guitar in that song is not in standard tuning and the tab you have there is an arrangement for standard tuning. I think the transcriber should have put a descending bassline in there and called the chord C but it works the way it is as it is a C chord and harmonizes the melody which is what most people will pay attention to anyway.

Nice little piece of contrary motion - one voice moves up while another moves down at the same time.

[EDIT] I think that the transcriber called it an Am7 because that is the fingering shape of an Am7 (which would normally include the open A string as well) In this case it's actually a C but I think he simply looked at the shape and called it an Am7. -At least that's my best guess.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Apr 3, 2011,