#1
I was taking an ear training test at www.good-ear.com . I choosed "chromatic intervals up/down". But it says minor 2nd and maj 2nd? I tought it was the same intervall? One time i answered Min2nd, and got wrong, but i tried again with maj2nd, and got right. Can someone explain this to me?
#2
I believe that the minor 2nd is only a semitone, while the major 2nd is a whole tone.

Like a C to a C# is a minor 2nd, and a C to a D is a major 2nd.
Last edited by jonnyxboy at Apr 3, 2011,
#3
You're kinda right. The 2nd in a minor scale is the same as in a Major scale, but the term "minor 2nd" is often used to describe the interval a semitone higher than the tonic of the song. So basically, the minor 2nd in a major or minor key is always non-diatonic.

EDIT: it probably really needs a name like "diminished" or "dominant" 2nd, but its not diminished or dominant so you cant use those. Its just a flat major 2nd.

EDIT:EDIT:
Quote by jonnyxboy

Like a C to a C# is a minor 2nd, and a C to a D is a major 2nd.

technically it would be a C to a Db. I know its the enharmonic equivalent, but if you put that on a music theory test or on a score you'd be wrong.
Last edited by guy_tebache at Apr 3, 2011,
#4
Intervals are based on the Major scale: (where lines represent semitones which are 'missed out')

C|D|EF|G|A|BC

These intervals are Major/Perfect (Maj2, Maj3, P4, P5, maj6, maj7)
If you want notes outside the scale you have to go up or down in semitones

<-Down -> Up
Diminished - Minor - Major - Augmented

Diminished - Perfect - Augmented

C-> D is going to the 2nd interval of the major scale = Maj 2nd
C - > Db is going to the 2nd interval but 1 semitone down relative to the major = Min 2nd
C-> Dbb = going to second interval but 2 semis down = Diminished 2nd
C->D# = going to second interval but 1 semi up = Aug 2nd

NB C is enharmonic to (the same pitch as) Dbb but C-C and C-Dbb function as different intervals and can be distinguished in different musical contexts

NB2: The Major and Minor Scale have nothing to do with intervals per se - it just happens that the melodic minor includes mostly minor intervals relative to the root. The min2nd is NOT used in the minor scale

EDIT: guy Tebache said it well - a minor second interval = Flat Major Second

the 2nd note in a minor scale is different (and is a major 2nd interval just to be confusing)
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Last edited by doive at Apr 3, 2011,
#5
Quote by jonnyxboy
I believe that the minor 2nd is only a semitone, while the major 2nd is a whole tone.

Like a C to a C# is a minor 2nd, and a C to a D is a major 2nd.


Almost...
C-C# is augmented unison
C-Db is a min 2nd

Although C# and Db are the same pitch they are different notes and indicate a different musical context...
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#6
Quote by jonnyxboy
Like a C to a C# is a minor 2nd, and a C to a D is a major 2nd.

A C to a Db is a minor second. C to C# isn't considered a second, even though C# and Db are enharmonically equivalent.

And yeah, minor second = 1 semitone and major second = 1 tone.
Both the major and minor scales contain the major 2nd, and not the minor 2nd.
#7
Quote by guy_tebache
You're kinda right. The 2nd in a minor scale is the same as in a Major scale, but the term "minor 2nd" is often used to describe the interval a semitone higher than the tonic of the song. So basically, the minor 2nd in a major or minor key is always non-diatonic.

EDIT: it probably really needs a name like "diminished" or "dominant" 2nd, but its not diminished or dominant so you cant use those. Its just a flat major 2nd.

EDIT:EDIT:
technically it would be a C to a Db. I know its the enharmonic equivalent, but if you put that on a music theory test or on a score you'd be wrong.
Thanks, but what exactly means diatonic?
#8
Diatonic is the term used to describe the stepping pattern contained within the major scale and its seven modes (2-2-1-2-2-2-1, 1-2-2-1-2-2-2, 2-1-2-2-1-2-2, etc...all the possible configurations of seven-note scales where the two semitones are as far apart from each other as possible if the scale were to repeat at the octave forever)
Last edited by inf4nticide at Apr 3, 2011,
#9
In phrygian minor everything is trve minor.... but the rest ist just like in all the other modes...just one note that really counts.

Major is feelable in the major third and major sixth
minor in the minor third and sixth.
The Quint is clear and the second, too. I guess.

Aeolian and Phrygian modes differs mainly by the minor second which makes P even more minor....
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#11
It's been covered pretty well so far, but just to be sure, a min2 is only a half-step whereas a Maj2 is a whole step (or two half-steps). So, as has been said, C to Db is a minor second, whereas C to D is a major second.

And diatonic refers to anything that fits into key signatures without using accidentals. For example, if you're in the key of Ab (4 flats, Bb Eb Ab Db), Ab Bb C Db Eb F and G are all diatonic. These notes also happen to make the major scale (specifically Ab major), which is considered a type of "diatonic" scale. The other diatonic scale is the natural minor scale. If you were using that same key signature except resolving to F, you would be using the F natural minor scale. Some consider the harmonic minor and melodic minor scales to be diatonic too, even though they use accidentals, just because they are so commonplace for use in minor keys.
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