#1
Hey guys, I've read the stickies on modes (and bought tons of books that I've also read) but I'm trying to get a little clarification on something. If I'm playing a song that keeps resolving to G (and all the chords are in G major), would it be considered an E Aeolian if the lowest note was an E? I know that the two ways to define the root in the key of a song is look for the lowest note or the note it keeps resolving to. I'm getting confused when they're not necessarily the same thing. For example:

In Ben E King's 'Stand by Me' The song is in G Major key with the following progression (based on G Major scale):

I - I - vi - vi - IV - V - I - I.

So it starts and resolves on the GM, but the lowest root note is the E from the vi since its played in the 1st octave - occupying only the first frets 0-2 on 6th string only for GM. How should I look at this from a mode perspective? Is it a G major scale that just happens to have one of the scale degrees occupying a lower octave than the root and its no biggie? Or would it be considered E Aeolian? or something totally different?

Sorry if this seems like a dumb question, but I couldn't find any previous posts addressing priority when resolving and lowest key are in conflict. I wouldn't be too big on worrying about little things like this, but if I try to play the Em (vi) on the same octave as the GM (I), it sounds totally different (obviously) and not at all right, so it seems like an important point for me to get clarification on. Thanks in advance for anyone willing to help me out.
Last edited by stephenb at Apr 3, 2011,
#2
Quote by stephenb
song that keeps resolving to G (and all the chords are in G major)................... How should I look at this from a mode perspective?



^ well, it's in G Major. Talking about it from a "mode/modal perspective" would be inappropriate.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 3, 2011,
#3
The key of a song depends entirely on where it resolves to. Even if a song in G did start on the E note, it would still be in G major because it resolves to G.

I think you're confused on the idea of relative keys. G major and E minor are relative keys, meaning they share the same notes.

Also, E Aeolian has nothing to do with this. It seems when some people learn modes, they start referring to major and minor as Ionian and Aeolian, even when it is entirely inappropriate. That song is in G major. No modes involved at all.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
Last edited by rockingamer2 at Apr 3, 2011,
#4
if it resolved to e but had the notes of g major, then it would be E aeolian
#5
Quote by ExurKun
if it resolved to e but had the notes of g major, then it would be E minor

Fix'd
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#7
Damn, that was quick. You guys sure are on top of shit around here.

So stick to looking at the note it resolves to. got it, thanks guys.

Is there any special considerations that should be taken into account regarding the vi being in a lower octave when transposing? If I were to tell someone the scale progression, how would I communicate that the vi should be in 1 lower octave?
#8
Well, if it's really that important, just say, "the vi is in the octave below."
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#9
Quote by stephenb
Damn, that was quick. You guys sure are on top of shit around here.

So stick to looking at the note it resolves to. got it, thanks guys.

Is there any special considerations that should be taken into account regarding the vi being in a lower octave when transposing? If I were to tell someone the scale progression, how would I communicate that the vi should be in 1 lower octave?


How would you be communicating it in the first place? Tab, Notation, etc?

Best,

Sean
#10
Quote by Sean0913
How would you be communicating it in the first place? Tab, Notation, etc?

Best,

Sean


I'm not really planning on communicating it to anyone, it was more a means of posing my question. If there was a regularly used way of communicating that then it would help me to know it for when I encounter it myself.
#11
It would depend on the venue - if I were telling someone in person, I might just say the position of the chord, because function is the idea behind the chord, it can be in any register, however even an inversion. So there's not really any difficulty or means where I need to tell someone which chord to play and where. Usually in practice it never comes up, and I dont see that often being the case in your situation either.

Best,

Sean