#1
I've been playing guitar for a couple years and I I've always knew my timing is horrendous, but now I want to fix that. How do you guys do it? What process goes through your head? I know your all going to say use a metronome which is pretty obvious but if I try to play a song with a metronome I have no idea where to begin. How do you guys know how long each note should be and things like that? Please help me out here.
#2
Before learning a song from tabs n stuff I always ensure I know the song inside out first - I get a real feel for the song that way and stuff like rhythm and even improvising come much easier.
#3
Quote by funkymonk1985
Before learning a song from tabs n stuff I always ensure I know the song inside out first - I get a real feel for the song that way and stuff like rhythm and even improvising come much easier.


this.

listening to music is just as important as practicing it
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#4
As well as listening to the song to get the feel, using guitar pro helps with that, as well as a backing track, and most important of all if you have the backing track: tapping your foot to the beat, it's sooo handy, started doing it and all my timing issues went out the window.

If you're playing metal, headbanging helps too, not only does it help with presence, but you will subconsciously do it perfectly in time.
#6
Counting/subdividing tends to move to a subconscious level once you've gotten good at keeping time. That's not to say that you'll never tap your foot, bob your head, or count eighths/sixteenths for a syncopated passage ever again once you've become proficient, but for the most part you can listen and keep time without actively thinking about it.

How do you guys know how long each note should be and things like that?

Not sure what exactly you're asking here. Musical notation denotes different divisions with the beat with different symbols, so that's a start. Using a metronome gives you an aural ruler to measure note lengths against once you know this, as that note takes up a certain amount of time depending on the tempo (quarter note in 60 BPM common time lasts one second, at 120 BPM it would last 1/2 a second). Subtleties beyond this are a matter of style/sound and may or may not be indicated in your music - this is a matter of listening and/or thinking about how you want that note to sound within the given lick.
Last edited by Nightfyre at Apr 3, 2011,
#7
When I play rhythm stuff I can keep time ok but when it comes to the solos it's bad. What steps should I take to get good at staying in time for solos?
#8
If you absolutely have to, just tap your feet/heel/whatever to the beat. If you seriously have no idea on how to subdivide, use Guitar Pro and look at the standard notation and figure out what notes are how long.
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#9
Quote by Steelrz13
When I play rhythm stuff I can keep time ok but when it comes to the solos it's bad. What steps should I take to get good at staying in time for solos?

Get better at staying in time during rhythm parts, listening to other instruments for time cues, and developing your internal sense of time.
#10
If you practice scales or even chromatic exercises in 1 note per beat, then 2 notes per beat, then 3, then 4, then 8, etc.... using a metronome of course...

Your rhythm will improve. No doubt.
#11
You have two options
1) Play with a metronome
2) Learn the song perfectly and play to the song.


I honestly did #2 for like 5+ years and my timing is pretty solid now.
Recently I've been using #1, but I do this for exercise techniques.
: )
#12
if you mean solos are bad timing there's probably two reasons:

1) the solos are too tricky (like sweeps etc) and you need to keep practicing them til you build up speed

OR

2) you dont understand the solo - is the solo along a certain harmony line? is it complimenting the drums? what other indicators are there in the song that suggest where the solo may go? is there a key change?

Sorry to repeat myself again, but if it is not one of those two, I'd say you need to know the song better - either that or you have no rhythm. hopefully it's not the latter. it probably isnt coz you said your rhythm playing was ok.

Also, about the Guitar Pro stuff, I do use this a lot too, but remember that they are not perfect and even 5 star rated tunes have mistakes! so use your own talent too and play it as you feel right!

:-)

good luck dude
#13
Just practice along with a metronome dude. There are a few people i know who have poor timing and its because they never practice with a metronome. I suppose another good thing is to play along with stuff a lot. Im not meaning to sound cocky but a lot of people told me im very tight. That might be because im just natural with time, or because i play a lot along with songs from my itunes n stuff. But yeah, always practice with a metronome and it should come sooner or later and before you know it you will be asking yourself how couldnt you play in time?

Take care and happy guitaring... if thats a real word
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#14
I play scales and exercises with a metronome and I can do that easily, but then if you tell me to play a song with one I just get lost. I have no idea what to do.
#15
It might be that you need to listen to the song some more to get a feel for it. And if the song you're trying to play has a complex rhythm, you might wanna slow it down like half speed or more.
#16
I dunno. I just listen out with my ears and then put the beat in my body somewhere (everywhere). like if I have gum in my mouth, you can bet your ass I will be chewing it on the beat.

if I need to play something perfectly specific, in my brain I generally count it out at first, but once I get it, I just go with how my body feels like it should play it.
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#17
+1 to everything Nightfyre said.

If you can play scales/exercises in time it shouldn't be much of a leap to play your solos in time. Again, use a metronome, start out slow and play it absolutely perfectly (no matter how slow at first, even 4 seconds each note, it doesn't matter) then slowly increase the tempo. Repeat until you are at your desired tempo.

Then, once at your desired tempo, go a bit higher. This is kind of like over learning and is very beneficial, think of it as headroom.