#1
I just recently started playin my acoustic again... it collects dust now and again.

But after playin electric for a while and now switching back to acoustic my finger tips seem to just get destroyed from playing, and they hurt constantly it seems.

Now I'm not tryin to complain, but I played that acoustic exclusively for over 2 years and my finger tips have never hurt this bad. WTF?
#2
try setting it up with lower action if possible. If not, it's just a matter of getting used to it all over again...only time can improve it
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#3
Umm... Rest?

Why not stop playing for the rest of the day and let them heal?
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#5
it's possible that due to humidity issues, your action is higher now than it was 2 years ago. it's also possible that your strings are now ratty and old, which can make them harder to play or even have tiny tiny rust on the strings that can cut into fingertips.

keep in mind that the average electric guitar strings are much lighter than the average light guitar strings. you might want to slap a set of extra lights on your acoustic for a while.
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#6
Practicing in short frequent sessions, rather than long marathons. That's what helped me develop calluses faster without destroying them after.
#7
There seems to be a topic on this at least once every week. Its gonna hurt at first.... and/or after a long hiatus. That's just the way it is. If it hurts for a year, then there's something to talk about.
#10
try switching to coated strings. Elixirs are sooo smooth and do not tear up my fingers much at all. while you're at it try lowering the action if you think it might help.
#12
You could take the bitch route and buy coated extra light strings and lower your action slightly above buzzing level.

Or you could just man up and get some callouses.

Your choice.
Sincerely, Chad.
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#13
It happen to me too and just passed after a few weeks. But if it's hurting that bad try lower your action as been said in above posts.
#14
Couple of guys I knew (Identical twins, actually) used to dip the tips of their fretting fingers in an epoxy resin to make them hard and not hurt.
It seemed to work :/
But I'm not going to do it.
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#15
One thing that I notice with beginners (myself included) is that you simply push down much harder than you need to. If I actually play attention I realize that I could use about half the pressure, or even less, than what I'm using. But I never really took the time to practice pushing down softer, so eventually I just got used to it. Now I've got thick calluses and can't feel my fingertips.

I'd recommend either get lighter gauge strings, lower the action, push softer, or just push through the pain until you're conditioned to it.
#16
I see a lot of people saying push through the pain. I don't necessarily agree with that.

When you play when there's a lot of pain, it's gonna condition your body to have a lot of tension from anticipating that there will be pain in the future. It's associating something really negative, pain, with playing the guitar. This is NOT WHAT YOU WANT.

Instead, I think you ought to make your sessions shorter but more frequent, so that you don't get to the point where the pain is agonizing and you wish you weren't even playing. You'll still be playing a good amount, but your calluses develop faster and boom... pain gone.
#18
Quote by no bs johnny
I see a lot of people saying push through the pain. I don't necessarily agree with that.

When you play when there's a lot of pain, it's gonna condition your body to have a lot of tension from anticipating that there will be pain in the future. It's associating something really negative, pain, with playing the guitar. This is NOT WHAT YOU WANT.

Instead, I think you ought to make your sessions shorter but more frequent, so that you don't get to the point where the pain is agonizing and you wish you weren't even playing. You'll still be playing a good amount, but your calluses develop faster and boom... pain gone.

Depends on the person.

Paganini, as a student, played the violin so often and for so long that he would get cuts in his fingers. He would play until it because unbearable, then eventually got his parents to bandage him up, then he would play some more.

That's an extreme example, but you get my meaning. Different strokes for different folks.
Sincerely, Chad.
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#19
Quote by Chad48309
Depends on the person.

Paganini, as a student, played the violin so often and for so long that he would get cuts in his fingers. He would play until it because unbearable, then eventually got his parents to bandage him up, then he would play some more.

That's an extreme example, but you get my meaning. Different strokes for different folks.


That's true, but I figured this particular person starting the thread about having a pain problem would not appreciate being told he needs to man up LOL
#20
Fair enough. I'm just playing Devil's Advocate.
Sincerely, Chad.
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