#2
In my old band we didn't have a very efficient method but it worked. Me and the other guitarist would come to practise with a bunch of riffs that we had come up with, then basically we would all just discuss as a band which ones suited as an intro, verse, chorus, etc and we made necessary changes to riffs and stuff during practise. And then finally the singer would write his lyrics and add the vocals and voila, song complete. Keep in mind these songs weren't very good though and that's partly why i left.
#3
Just jam with them dude. Record what you play, improvise a beat and just add to it. And its not like whatever you first come up with thats how its gonna be you gotta change some shit up to make it all fit together. Just takes some creativity and patience
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#4
I am in your predicament. BUT so far me and the vocalist/rhtyhm guitarist write all of the lyrics, I write most of the music, and when we've practiced we swap ideas and such. I'll usually introduce a riff (Usually a lead and rhythm part), then our bassist will come up with a bassline, and the drummer will get a good beat going. Sometimes we'll have a more specific idea of what we want in our heads. Then we introduce the lyrics, but so far our singer or I will come up with vocal melodies on our own, then introduce them at practice and work on something good.

If anybody has other, potentially easier ideas I need to hear them!
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#5
we just pick an idea or subject for the song and then jam untill we find something we like for instrumentals find a melody and throw some words on it. hope that helps
#6
I usually write the guitar parts and lyrics myself, then show them to the guys at practice. After I teach a song to our rhythm guitarist our bassist and drummer write their own parts. It mostly works. Except that our singers always suck, so I'm thinking of just taking that over myself.
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#7
Well, I guess I'm kinda the main songwriter for my band. I'm the bassist and lead vocalist. I usually write the lyrics and bassline and crap then play it for the rest of the band, and then the guitarist writes the guitar line and the drummer the drum line. We thought it was a fair thing to just write what we play, so that nobody had to play something they didn't like. (Like, I don't write drum lines and shove them up in the drummer's face. He writes all the drum parts). When we first started doing this, I felt kinda like I was doing to much and I wanted us to try writing as a group, and we failed. We literally sat there for 2 hours and came up with absolutely nothing. So we just went back to our old thing of write what you play. It works for us...
#8
Practice is "generally" a time for just that practice. Any songwriting that happened normally took place outside of practice. If anyone came up with a song, they would develop it as much as possible, then bring it to practice and we would jam it.

When I was younger the bands I played with wrote by just showing up to practice and playing what ever, this always took forever to develop anything good. And people would get bored, there's no real direction because nobody has a real idea of what there expose to do, your just repeatedly jamming the same lick or lyric over and over again.

You need to come to practice, and be like, this is what I have for an intro, here's a bridge, here's the verse and a variation or two, the chorus is here, and a space for a guitar solo can go after the second chorus, and then have a way to end the song. You don't have to have everything note for note, but have a idea of chord progression and key and how the song is going to progress. Get some input, change a few things and bam you have a song.

Most of the time it's usually only one or two members coming up with the songs. It's sad to say, but it's hard to include everyone in the actual process.
#9
^^^^^

I agree with this.

Although on the few occasions where we have written music at practice, as a band, it's involved one or two people guiding people through what's needed, and a massive whiteboard to write the chords and song structure down.
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#10
Almost everyone writes on our band, so we'd all work on our own song as much as we could on our own before we brought it and jammed it. Personally I think that's one of the best ways, you songs become more "in and of itself" rather than just another part of your "sound"
#11
Quote by AlanHB
^^^^^

I agree with this.

Although on the few occasions where we have written music at practice, as a band, it's involved one or two people guiding people through what's needed, and a massive whiteboard to write the chords and song structure down.



Yeah, every once and a while, a decent jam will happen and something will progress, but at least for me; 9 times out of 10 nothing really came from it.

That white board is so necessary lol. We actually got one from my old highschool when they were remodeling the place. It takes up one full wall of our practice space. Use it for everything from writing songs, to memos, to brainstorming, to setlists.
#12
2112 wasn't written in a day, but most pop songs are written in under an hour. Keep that in mind.
#13
Have a formula that works for you and sounds good such as:
Intro
Verse
Chorus
Verse
Chorus
Solo
Chorus

Then have your lyricist write lyrics in the formula, find a catchy riff to base the song around (the "hook") then jam on it until everyone figures out their parts.
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#14
Quote by Punkrokkboi
Have a formula that works for you and sounds good such as:
Intro
Verse
Chorus
Verse
Chorus
Solo
Chorus

Then have your lyricist write lyrics in the formula, find a catchy riff to base the song around (the "hook") then jam on it until everyone figures out their parts.


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#15
Quote by Hail
sup slash


What?

I was just using the Verse Chorus method as an example. You can make the song structure as simple or as complex as you want, but you gotta break stuff down because trying to write a whole song as a band with everyone writing at the same time is a bitch. I've tried it and it isnt very productive in my case.
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#16
Depends on the band. I'm the primary songwriter in mine, so I just write songs on my own with an acoustic. I come up with a melody, chord progression, lyrics, and general structure and bring it to the table at practice. From there we plug it in (or keep it acoustic if it makes sense to) and build the song from there.
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#17
In my band, we all share writing duties, but we generally write independently. In between practices we'll show each other music and lyrics, and fit them together, or try to to write lyrics for each others' music or vice versa. then at practices we try them out, and change things that don't work.
#18
Have the drummer start a beat, any tempo, start playing to it (whether off the top of your head or already written), after the a few completions of the riff over and over, the drummer will get into it, start doing fills.. wah-lah. At least thats how I do it.
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#19
Typically I write the riffs and show my bassist what I've come up with. She'll tell me what she thinks, fuck around with it for a bit and add in that 'pop' element to my typicaly bluesy riffs. Often she helps write the chorus. Then she'll come up with lyrics and a vocal melody that goes over my music.

Basically, I write the music, she does the lyrics and our drummer just sits there as drummers tend to do

Every once in a while we'll all jam together as a band to write something. Usually I'll have had a few riffs I've been fucking with and our bassist will improvise some lyrics. It's worked for us in the past, but typically our better songs are writen alone, without the band. We're all very anti-social
#20
With us, there's usually some kind of form - I'll have a fantastic idea, write it all down in guitarpro, then send it online to my bassist and guitarist - They'll tweak it, and help me finish it off, then we'll all keep sending it between eachother until we're all happy with it. Hooray for the internet!
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#21
I will come up with a melody or a few chords and then I just throw them in a bin.
I will keep doing this until I find something in the bin that I have an idea to follow up on or find two bits that go well together. Either way I will come up with a song with all the drum, bass and keyboard parts too.
I then record that with a drum machine. Then I take out the drums and the drummer records over it, then I re-record over the drummer and everyone else records their parts.
A bit long but that is how I do it.
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#22
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2112 wasn't written in a day, but most pop songs are written in under an hour. Keep that in mind.


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#23
My singer/keyboardist and I are the main songwriters for my band. With my stuff I'll record it on my own at home and present it to the rest of them and say here learn this so it's like learning a cover. In other cases, I'll meet with her personally and we'll come up with an arrangement that way, or I'll tell her to meet with the other guitarist or I'll meet with him and work on stuff. We try to make sure at least two people know a song before it's brought in.
#24
Usually, in my band one of the guitarists comes to practice with an almost completely written song (at least for his instrument, but sometimes we already have the parts for each instrument written out.) If you're capable of writing for each individual instrument it's a huge help and makes things easier and makes you look like a genious. If not, I usually get to gether and show the song to my other guitarist, he takes some time to learn it or write his own part on his own, and then when we practice as a full band we just have to put a beat and a bassline to it.
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#25
My friend/guitarist just writes music on his computer using TuxGuitar. Most of it's written without ever picking up an instrument. He'll write both guitars, the bass, keyboards/other random instruments, and usually the drums. Going into the project, the only parts he hadn't written were any vocal lines, a handful of the drums he had his friend write, and some bass lines I tweaked and/or wrote. Now that we've actually got other members going, they'll probably edit their parts, and contribute other ideas, etc. The whole writing without touching an instrument may not work for everyone, but he's damn good at it. And I've even taken a bit of a liking to it as well, so it may be worth a shot.
#26
With my band, the two guitarists and I use GuitarPro to write the guitar parts outside of practice. We finish the whole song before we show each other. Once it's complete the guitarists all sit down and learn it (at practice). Creative input is during this time as well. Then when that's done, we play it in front of our drummer. He thinks of parts while we run through it a couple of times. The drummer might have input as well. Then we just play it until we get good at it.
#27
Here's how my band does it: We either start with a jam, or a riff/ chords someone else already has written that a couple of us really like. If it's form the other guitar player in the band, I correct his timing since he has almost never written anything to a beat.

After that, we either keep grooving or stop halfway because we ask each other too many times if we like it or not. Sometimes our singer will get dramatic and say it's "not us" or other bullshit, and we spend an hour explaining to him why he's wrong.

The music is almost always done first, then we take the original jam and work out what we do/don't like. This can take anywhere form a month to over a year. If I'm feeling courageous and the band is open minded, I step up and make timing suggestions/ changes since we're not the tightest band and all I've cared about since the beginning is how tight we can be.

Then we write the lyrics. At one point we tried "we" then everyone gradually realized it is impossible for 5 people to write lyrics to one song. Our singer will try to improvise a melody, but usually just follows the chord progression, more or less lacking a melody.


That's our current song writing process. It's full of holes that need to be fixed, I know. I try my best, and sometimes it gets difficult/ I get perceived as annoying. Should I be working with more apt musicians? Maybe. Am I afraid to change the situation I have here though? There's some magic in what we've been doing... I love it.
#28
We write in a variety of different ways.

One song was done with the singer and I (we both play guitar AND bass in the band) at my house one day just dicking around, and he came up with something cool, and so we recorded it, and when he got home he finished writing the song.

A few songs have been the result of me playing a groove on bass or guitar, and the rest of the other two guys locking into it.

One or two are from the drummer playing something really cool, and then the singer or I coming up with something really great to match it.

A LOT of our stuff really just comes from us all in the same room and jamming together. It's what we get off on.

The rest of our songs have been written and demoed by either me or the singer and sent to the other guys in the band to learn, and then when we all meet next we figure out any difficulties.
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#29
Our band only gets together once a week, so our practice time consists of polishing up our timing as a group on songs we already know or have learned.

We do mostly covers, but for originals it pretty much requires showing up with a mostly finished product, even if it is a sloppy demo or riffs recorded on Audacity over a staple electronic drum beat. My most recent is in my profile, called "Sold Out". It only took 3 hours or so to record all the parts so the band could hear the total idea. Our bassist has done the same thing using Garage Band.

Our bassist usually gives some very solid tweaks since he has many years of music & gigging experience. But writing takes place for the most part individually since practice usually always turns into a waste if we try to hash stuff out on the spot.

On stuff I've written I record the whole thing on Audacity with multiple tracks. I do everything - guitar, bass, vox, and drums via Hydrogen. Not all of the tracks are high quality, but it gets my vision saved in the easiest way to communicate it. If the band likes my song and we decide to do it, I then mute out tracks as needed so they can isolate what they need to learn. They also give input and tweaks. But it's all done offline so we don't kill valuable practice time.