#1
So I've been playing for 8-9 hours+ each day, I'm going to bump it up to 10. I love playing the guitar, I don't know why I can't put it down.


I've put together different ways of training techniques, I'm trying to find the best way to make my technique razor sharp.
So far I'm trying this method:

Start day 1 at comfortable speed, practice for 1-2 hours, increase tempo by 5 bpm each day, do various speeds to ensure technique. Do not progress if it cannot be played perfectly cleanly.
I'm doing various sweeping techniques since I've been playing for a while and want to become amazing like Broderick/Loomis. I'm doing all types of practice. Pentatonic, alternate picking, economy (little of this since I can go 180bpm 16ths pretty easily, but see bottom with this), sweeping, string skipping, tapping, vibrato... etc.


How do you practice to achieve perfect technique so I can try it out and see how it works?
I've tried doing the 40 bpm thing and it doesn't seem to be helping. I feel that I already have the core down for the most part, and when i try to go faster I end up just playing slow because I condition myself for days on end to only go at 40 bpm.


As that note I made for economy picking
So far I can do like 180-200 bpm 16ths pretty good with them. I'm really comfortable with it and can do almost any scale (excluding odd ones like harmonic minor which I love). Though I'm at a point where I don't know how to improve my speed and accuracy.
For those of you with solid technique, how do you refine it further? I heard that you need to put tons of time in when you're at the later stages of the game just to barely notice even anything. I'm using as little pressure as possible [otherwise its impossible to get high speeds], so it's just a matter of finding out why occasionally there will be a little fudge up. Can a human play perfectly all the time? I know even the best of the best can only play great 99% of the time and we all mess up, and my goal is to be the guy who can do 99% instead of 95-96% success at fast speeds.

Please note that I'm not some kind of God, I probably guarantee I suck compared to the advanced/elite players. I just want to become one of them.
: )
Last edited by Cjk10000 at Apr 3, 2011,
#2
Careful not to hurt yourself. Even with perfect technique you can get tendinitis from over doing it. 6-8 hrs in separate 2 hr sessions is plenty enough.
#4
Quote by Tempoe
Careful not to hurt yourself. Even with perfect technique you can get tendinitis from over doing it. 6-8 hrs in separate 2 hr sessions is plenty enough.


Oh. Shit.

Where should I put breaks in? I do NOT want tendonitis or any type of injury.

I'm playing with a straight back and I'm using minimal pressure. What are signs of tendonitis? In fact, I don't really know what it is/means. Based on the latin I assume inflamed tendon? Does that occur in wrists? fingers? joints?

Thanks for bringing this to my attention, I never thought about anything like this


How the hell did Loomis and Broderick play like 14 hour days O_o
: )
#5
well you have that speed...what are you doing with it?

anyway my technique at the point im at isnt improving too much nowadays but what worked for me was always playing different things instead of drilling the same scale riff whayever that way my hamds are used to plying alot of different patterns so if i think of a new riff or see something odds are ive played some similar and i dont have to learn that riff if that makes any sence
#6
Quote by supersac
well you have that speed...what are you doing with it?


Funny, my brother asked me this question today:
My answer to him was "I have these thoughts in my head of music that I want to turn into music, but I can't do it without getting really good technique up to par. In addition, if I ever want to play live... I'm going to have to be able to do this in my sleep."

I think it was Zaphod_Beeblebr that said once how on a bad day certain musicians still are able to pull awesome stuff out of their ass. When I read that, I knew it was serious time and that when I want to play live, I'm going to have to really up the ante on my skills.
When I watch all these people on youtube, you can just tell when certain people spent tons of time recording that perfect shot (especially with how crap some of their technique is). When it's live unfortunately there is no rewind button
: )
#7
^ that was a good answer hahah

something i forgot to mention in my last post
you should also spend some of that time on learning theory and ear training (might count that as your break) i lessened up on techniue practice and more on thoery and ear training and i noticed that is also if not more importannt that perfect technique
#8
Quote by supersac
^ that was a good answer hahah

something i forgot to mention in my last post
you should also spend some of that time on learning theory and ear training (might count that as your break) i lessened up on techniue practice and more on thoery and ear training and i noticed that is also if not more importannt that perfect technique



How did you practice ear training?
Thats one thing I wanted to get better at... though I haven't found a viable way yet

I was thinking of taking an advanced song and tabbing it... what do you do if you don't mind me asking?


Music theory should be good, I love knowing what I'm doing/what note I'm hitting
: )
#9
I don't know where you get the time from, but when I was in high school I used to do 5-6 hours a day after school and into the night. Got me quite far, but never as far as I want to get someday, but breaks are an important part of practising as well. One thing I'd like to say, really, is that 'speed' should NOT be the main focus of your practising. I made that mistake too and there's tons of stuff out there that I can not play, because may focus wasn't on beint musical and broadening my styles. Speed is nice, but in itself, being able to play 1000 scale really fast is worth absolutely nothing. Anyway, good luck practising!
I do not want to have a signature anymore.
#10
Quote by RDSElite
I don't know where you get the time from, but when I was in high school I used to do 5-6 hours a day after school and into the night. Got me quite far, but never as far as I want to get someday, but breaks are an important part of practising as well. One thing I'd like to say, really, is that 'speed' should NOT be the main focus of your practising. I made that mistake too and there's tons of stuff out there that I can not play, because may focus wasn't on beint musical and broadening my styles. Speed is nice, but in itself, being able to play 1000 scale really fast is worth absolutely nothing. Anyway, good luck practising!

As an answer to the question of time; I have literally NOTHING to do until the university year starts in the fall. All my friends are gone, I don't have any online games I like to play and the weather sucks too much out for me to to anything. On a nice summer day I'm going to be in the backyard with a guitar getting some vitamin D.


I agree w/ what you say about speed. Unfortunately I need to achieve some level of speed, but I'm not going for it alone-- I'm trying to achieve speed through perfect technique so my live playing will be amazing. I could reduce my ideas by 20 bpm and it'd work, but at the tempo I have it at I really like
As I've learned from the past, attempting to get high speed will result in failure technique and inhibit the exact thing you're trying to achieve.
: )
#11
It'd be cool if you post some progress videos periodically so we can see how you're uh...progressing.

As for ear training transcribe some songs (start small) and try to identify chords by ear.

Also, make sure you spend some time just noodling around. I may sound counterproductive, but I was into the whole exercises+metronome all the time at one point, and when it came to improvisation and noodling all I knew how to do was play exercises, so that's what I sounded like. It may be cool to play a scale at 200 bpm or massive sweep patterns, but remember to be a musician before a guitarist.
#12
Yea, I agree with some of the guys here. You shouldn't over focus on having perfect technique. It should be ONE of the things you focus on, but not the main thing. It gets harder to progress if you lose your sense of having fun on guitar.

I also found that adding very frequent breaks makes long practice sessions much more doable, and effective. Then I did the research on why. It turns out that motor learning is more efficient when you practice in small chunks, then forget about it, then try to remember it again, etc. I've found this to be SUPER accurate.
#13
Quote by dr83

Also, make sure you spend some time just noodling around. I may sound counterproductive, but I was into the whole exercises+metronome all the time at one point, and when it came to improvisation and noodling all I knew how to do was play exercises, so that's what I sounded like. It may be cool to play a scale at 200 bpm or massive sweep patterns, but remember to be a musician before a guitarist.


Do this.
I feel that I do too much "noodling around" and not enough practice. Which is why I've just earlier decided to practice two hours everyday on scales, with small "noodle"breaks every once in a while.
..I was watching my death.
#14
How about taking a break from all the fast shred technique stuff and looking for a slightly different angle on the whole thing? Personally I've also practiced upwards of 8 hours a day on technique for an extended period of time, and it gets harder and harder to see progress (for me at least and apparently for you as well). When this happens I either take a break off the guitar (like a few days or so), or focus on stuff that doesn't require any sort of speedy shred stuff. And then coming back a week later I've found that I'm playing better and cleaner than I had been before. My theory on this is that there's only so much information your body can digest, esp when it comes to muscle memory so if you give it a few days to catch up it can yield great results
#18
Quote by fc89konkari
hes broderick.

I don't know why that made me laugh so hard. I'm sigging that.
#20
Blimey. I love guitar but ill get too annoyed with my playing to practice that long lol... 2-3/4-5 hours a day is long enough for me :P

Just a bit of advice though, its always healthy as a musician to have other things going on outside of music. Keep music as your main focus obviously, as i do with mine, but its good to have hobbies like... i dunno, Two of mine... Art and Astronomy lol. It helps develope your style aswell. I might sound a bit wacky but all that spiritual shit sorta works :P

Take care and happy guitaring my friend
Marshall Vintage Modern 2466 and Gibson Les Paul Custom is litteraly sex in my ear!!!

"THESE AMPS GO TO 11!!!!!!!!!!"


#21
Regarding avoiding injury -

Your left and right wrists should be fairly straight and relaxed at all times.

Avoid overpractising stretches, finger rolls and tough barre chords, as they are the most punishing on the hand. Take these a little every day.

Drink plenty of water and eat a banana a day.
#22
Quote by Freepower
Regarding avoiding injury -

Your left and right wrists should be fairly straight and relaxed at all times.

Avoid overpractising stretches, finger rolls and tough barre chords, as they are the most punishing on the hand. Take these a little every day.

Drink plenty of water and eat a banana a day.



this brings up these questions:

is practicing arpeggios and vibrato a bad idea for long periods of time? as thread starter said... i try arpeggios on frets 1-5... is that a bad idea when i never use them there ??

why a banana?
Last edited by TheChosen1One at Apr 4, 2011,
#23
Quote by TheChosen1One
why a banana?


Potassium, it's good for your nerves and your joints, and has been link to increases in the rate at which minor injuries will heal.

You could just take a supplement if you really hate bananas.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#24
Seems like you created this thread as an excuse to tell others the hours you practise and how great you are. This is the vibe (which seemed blatantly obvious) that i got. I know at your stage of guitar playing you realize that practise is the key to improving on anything. You don't need any of us to tell you that.
You're definitely overdoing it though. You're not gonna take in as much info as you would if you practise for just a couple hours a day. There's no race to become the best. There's no age where you can't be considered "cool".
I'd settle down on your playing because i think everyone would agree that you're overdoing it.
#25
is practicing arpeggios and vibrato a bad idea for long periods of time? as thread starter said... i try arpeggios on frets 1-5... is that a bad idea when i never use them there ??


Well, if the arpeggios contain big stretches then yeah, and if you're doing wide rock vibrato, then yeah, you don't want to overdo it.

If you're trying arpeggios on frets 1-5 and never using them... then start figuring out how to use them or stop practising them.
#26
Yep. Actually it gets quite boring after you've achieved your speed goal. Cuz you look ahead and see nothing... I tried and did 16ths at about 300+bpm, to try reach that brazilian guy on youtube, but now what? I really spend all the time playing random stuff that comes on to my fingers and I love it. And most of the time I'm at 80-140bpm with all lenghts of note as I feel like doin. However I've noticed an increase in speed threshold without really focused on doing so.
So, I guess after about 200-220bpm, one doesn't really need to push it further. It just happens.
+ Yes the muscles and ligaments do get strained, however tendon tear is not possible unless you are doing it crazily wrong. continuous 0.5 hour is more than enough for tough exercises and one should take a break after it as long as necessary.

Potassium supplements aren't required(unless a doctor says so) if your diet is normal. Just make sure you get required rest/sleep.
#27
Quote by vayne92
Seems like you created this thread as an excuse to tell others the hours you practise and how great you are. This is the vibe (which seemed blatantly obvious) that i got. I know at your stage of guitar playing you realize that practise is the key to improving on anything. You don't need any of us to tell you that.

Don't go into anything where you have to use your intuition, because you don't have any if you actually think that.
Sounds like you have an issue with other people practicing a lot, and if you actually read the opening post, you'd see that I admitted multiple times that I think I suck and I'm reaching out for practice. If I was that *great*, I wouldn't be making this thread now would I?
You got some issues to resolve man ^_^, or maybe it's a comprehension issue. Probably both.


You're definitely overdoing it though. You're not gonna take in as much info as you would if you practise for just a couple hours a day. There's no race to become the best. There's no age where you can't be considered "cool".
I'd settle down on your playing because i think everyone would agree that you're overdoing it.

Tell that to the guitar elitists like Loomis, Broderick, Gilbert, Malmsteen... they played WAY more than I did and look where it got them. Very high places.
Plus, you're speaking on behalf of people who don't share the same view as everyone else. Don't claim you are when you're not please and thank you. Makes you look like an even bigger idiot.

There is no overdoing it if you practice correctly, so once again youre wrong. There's been some great advice in this thread how to practice 9+ hours sufficiently. I managed to do it yesterday and today I've noticed an insane speed improvement in my skills-- which of course is a result of accurate technique-- which is a result of my hard work that I put in.
And once again, thanks to the advice in this thread -- my fingers feel awesome at the end of the day. No problems, I stretch them, take my breaks, noodle...etc. It's working out awesome. If I get any pain, I cut back the time. It's just logic, don't know what you don't comprehend. Then again, I'm sure there are tons of posts in guitar techniques that go "why is my joint 10x larger than yesterday"?


For the most part your whole post was butt-hurt, or re-hashing things other people said. I still haven't decided if you're trolling, or you're just a weirdo with a chip on his shoulder. ^_^
When you want to actually contribute instead of posting ragey posts, come back and try again. Mang.


I tried and did 16ths at about 300+bpm, to try reach that brazilian guy on youtube, but now what


I'd probably not want to get that far, I don't think anything would sound good at 300+bpm 16ths

The goal of getting my technique accuracy is up so when I play live, I'll be able to sound flawless for the most part, delivering the audience the kind of music I want.
The ideas I have for music are going to require some accuracy, so once I reach around 170+ bpm 16ths, then the music creation begins.

The irritating thing for me is that the speed and accuracy I desire from technique are a prerequisite for the music I want to make.
Whats even worse, is it's only going to be used in the solos. I can play all the riffs and slow songs I want right now (I've tabbed a bunch out), but 1/2 of them are solos that sound awesome to me personally in guitar pro but I can't quite do it yet on the guitar. Sometimes I feel like I'm training for 15-20 seconds out of an entire song.
: )
#28
man I can never play for longer than 2 hours even though I loev guitar lol, I admire your dedication sir.
#29
Please don't forget about developing your 'ear' so can express yourself properly in music - that will make you a far more real, expressive and genuine musician than all the sweep picking and string skipping in the world.
#30
Quote by no bs johnny
Yea, I agree with some of the guys here. You shouldn't over focus on having perfect technique. It should be ONE of the things you focus on, but not the main thing. It gets harder to progress if you lose your sense of having fun on guitar.

I also found that adding very frequent breaks makes long practice sessions much more doable, and effective. Then I did the research on why. It turns out that motor learning is more efficient when you practice in small chunks, then forget about it, then try to remember it again, etc. I've found this to be SUPER accurate.



+1 on the second part of this. I'm only a beginner, I've only been playing for 8 days. I pick up my guitar, I play my 5 chords that I know. I just practice going back and forth between them randomly. Then I put down the guitar, watch some TV, then pick my guitar up like 5 minutes later and do it again. I've gotten a lot faster switching between those chords now.
#31
Holy crap, 10 hours a day? I'm lucky if I play a couple hours a week. But that's what happens when you have a job, a family, and responsibilities.

Stupid responsibilities...
Current Gear:
2002 Gibson Les Paul Standard
'57 AVRI Fender Stratocaster
MIJ Fender Jaguar Special HH
Marshall JVM410
Vox AC15 C2
#32
Quote by 57Goldtop
Holy crap, 10 hours a day? I'm lucky if I play a couple hours a week. But that's what happens when you have a job, a family, and responsibilities.

Stupid responsibilities...


Thats why I'm getting this stuff done now before I get those responsibilities. Once I get a job, and even a family (if that comes my way)... then there goes all my free time
: )
#33
Quote by TriviumisEpic
+1 on the second part of this. I'm only a beginner, I've only been playing for 8 days. I pick up my guitar, I play my 5 chords that I know. I just practice going back and forth between them randomly. Then I put down the guitar, watch some TV, then pick my guitar up like 5 minutes later and do it again. I've gotten a lot faster switching between those chords now.


See, i wish I tried that when I was beginning. I went the opposite approach and did the 6 hour marathon practice sessions.

Didn't work out so well at first.
#34
I think some people respond well to those marathon practice sessions. But you have to have the right personality for it.

For a lot of people that's a perfect recipe for getting discouraged quickly. Learning is a result of repetition over multiple times, not necessarily the length of time that something is done in one session.

In other words, if you fumble though something incorrectly for 3 hours in a row, you could very easily get discouraged and stop trying. But if you try to learn it in smaller bursts of time over several practice sessions then there's a better chance you'll stick with it.
Current Gear:
2002 Gibson Les Paul Standard
'57 AVRI Fender Stratocaster
MIJ Fender Jaguar Special HH
Marshall JVM410
Vox AC15 C2
#36
The ideas I have for music are going to require some accuracy, so once I reach around 170+ bpm 16ths, then the music creation begins.


I'd just like to point out that music creation should always be integral to your practice. Practising and putting off music is totally pointless, you'll end up with monster chops and nothing interesting happening. Make sure the process is always

brain/ears/heart -> hands

And never the opposite!
#37
You are learning songs and working on your reading chops, right??

As well as ear training.

Just my $0.02, but technique is only as good as the musical aptitude of the guitarist employing it. It is important for me to try to keep things fresh -- work on a tune, get some finger exercise in, play with a new chord progression, pick apart a solo as best I can, spend some time listening to something new ... etc etc.

Maybe that's some food for thought.

Cheers!
#38
You won't get tendonitis if you practice properly and with good technique. People get tendonitis from playing because they have too much tension in their playing or their posture is bad (most people don't even notice the tension or bad posture).

You can easily practice 10 hours a day without having to take a break but it's a bit silly to go through a 10 hour block, you'll benefit far more by practicing for half an hour then taking a ten minute break then starting again. <<<Try do that for 10 hours instead.

Lots of the guys at the Conservatorium I go to practice 10 hours a day without a problem at all, no tendonitis or hints of injuries because they have no excess tension in their playing and their posture is fantastic.