#1
This is probably one of those things where someone says "Play C ionian" and you say "I don't know what that is, but I can play C major if you want"


I know music theory, but I don't know what a "1 4 5" progression is or what the numbers represent.

Does that mean you take 1 4 5 of lets say a C scale?

C D E F G A B C
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

1 4 5 = C F G


Is that a chord I should play?

Or does that mean I should play C major, F major, G major?

Is capitalization mean major and non-caps = minor?


Or is it something else?


Dump the theory on me.
: )
#2
If Im correct and dont take my word for granted but those are the root notes for those chords, again i may be wrong but im taking a guess that that.
#3
1. Dude, it's ok people gotta start somewhere.

2. They are indeed chords.

3. Capitilization is important. Uppercase means Major, lowercase means minor.

4. There are seven chords that can be derived from any given major scale; for example, C Major:

C D E F G A B

Forming triads out of these seven notes we get:

CEG (I)
DFA (ii)
EGB (iii)
FAC (IV)
GBD (V)
ACE (vi)
BDF (vii dim)

The major chords are always I, IV, and V. The minor are always ii, iii, and vi, and the seventh chord is always dimished. This applies to all major scales.
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#4
Quote by Cjk10000
This is probably one of those things where someone says "Play C ionian" and you say "I don't know what that is, but I can play C major if you want"


I know music theory, but I don't know what a "1 4 5" progression is or what the numbers represent.

Does that mean you take 1 4 5 of lets say a C scale?

C D E F G A B C
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

1 4 5 = C F G


Is that a chord I should play?

Or does that mean I should play C major, F major, G major?

Is capitalization mean major and non-caps = minor?


Or is it something else?


Dump the theory on me.


If you don't know about the numerals, then you don't "know music theory" lol.

Yes, a numeral is assigned to each note of the scale. Except there's not really "8"

You've got everything correct. This thread has basically been answered by itself in the original post.
#5
I is a chord built on the 1st note of the scale, iii is the third, etc. Upper case means major, lower case means minor, there's other symbols for diminished, augmented, etc.
#6
Check out something called harmonization. Basically it is building triads out of the notes of the major scale. Check out the musictheory.net link in my sig.

Yes, caps means major and non-caps means minor.
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#7
Quote by BlackNapkin
3. Capitilization is important. Uppercase means Major, lowercase means minor.

I just want to add something about this.

You might see all caps. It wasn't until the 1940's (I think) that people started using lowercase numerals. There are some people (like the awesome MikeDodge) that use all upper case and denote minor chords by putting an "m". Like IIIm, or Im, etc.
#9
Quote by jayx124
a I IV V is usually referred to the blues progression and in this case most likely all will be dom7 chords

id say its more an everything progression since you can find it in pretty much every form of music
#10
Quote by z4twenny
id say its more an everything progression since you can find it in pretty much every form of music

Yeah, I-IV-I-V is one of the original chord progressions, the pazzamezzo moderno...omitting the second instance of the tonic doesn't really change the feel an awful lot.
Actually called Mark!

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#11
I IV V means you play the chords of the first fourth and fifth of the scale which are all the 3 majors.
I is always the first note in the sca.e.
Also for modes in chord progressions the chord you start with is the mode like you play d in c major it's a II chord and is dorian.
Highlighting the dorian differences between a minor scale in soloing would be dorian soloing and ofcourse play the triad alot.
with major modes you compare it to the major scale.
As for dorian you have a sharp 6th in comparision with the minor scale.
and lydian has a sharp 4th in comparision to a major scale.
Hope you get it
#13
Is there a typo in the title?
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#14
Quote by Venice King
Is there a typo in the title?

Good obsevation. The title says "1 6 5". I'm guessing it's a typo
I hate my sig
#15
Yeah I just looked at it and realized I put 6 instead of 4 >_< my bad.
****.

Luckily most people knew what I mean xD
: )
#16
Quote by Sean0913
It means you should go learn the basics of Diatonic Harmony, really, to understand what these guys are saying.

Sean


At least we offered him something rather than taking up space.
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Why not chromatics? Chromatic harmony was the "new thing" in the romantic era.
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Problem:
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#17
I offered him advice, if he doesn't have the background to understand these things he needs to start further back.

Feel free to teach him. I've never seen you post here before, I've been "taking up space" in this forum for about 2400 posts and counting, helping people.

Have at it.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Apr 4, 2011,
#18
Quote by BlackNapkin
1. Dude, it's ok people gotta start somewhere.

2. They are indeed chords.

3. Capitilization is important. Uppercase means Major, lowercase means minor.

4. There are seven chords that can be derived from any given major scale; for example, C Major:

C D E F G A B

Forming triads out of these seven notes we get:

CEG (I)
DFA (ii)
EGB (iii)
FAC (IV)
GBD (V)
ACE (vi)
BDF (vii dim)

The major chords are always I, IV, and V. The minor are always ii, iii, and vi, and the seventh chord is always dimished. This applies to all major scales.



^ this
shred is gaudy music
#19
Quote by liampje
Also for modes in chord progressions the chord you start with is the mode like you play d in c major it's a II chord and is dorian.


Incorrect. In the key of C major you will always be playing the C major scale irrespective of the chord played.

Quote by liampje
Highlighting the dorian differences between a minor scale in soloing would be dorian soloing and ofcourse play the triad alot.
with major modes you compare it to the major scale.
As for dorian you have a sharp 6th in comparision with the minor scale.
and lydian has a sharp 4th in comparision to a major scale.
Hope you get it


You'll have to understand the difference between major and minor keys and modes to realise why what you're saying doesn't necessarily make sense.

What you're really doing is:

(a) playing the major or minor scale and calling it something else

or

(b) playing the major or minor scale, with accidentals, and calling it a mode (incorrectly)
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#20
Quote by AlanHB
Incorrect. In the key of C major you will always be playing the C major scale irrespective of the chord played.


You'll have to understand the difference between major and minor keys and modes to realise why what you're saying doesn't necessarily make sense.

What you're really doing is:

(a) playing the major or minor scale and calling it something else

or

(b) playing the major or minor scale, with accidentals, and calling it a mode (incorrectly)
I was talking about modes.
If you play D dorian like I said you're in C major but the phase the song is in is a minor scale with a raised 6th.
#21
Quote by liampje
I was talking about modes.
If you play D dorian like I said you're in C major but the phase the song is in is a minor scale with a raised 6th.


I have to interject here, concerning the way that you stated it. Many times well meaning people make statements that contribute to the confusion. That's the only reason Im calling you out on this.

If you play in D Dorian, you arent in C Major. You are in D Dorian. The Tonal center is a D not a C. This is fundamental. No matter what you play over C, Call it "G Grandma Paulies Favorite Strawberrytime scale" I don't care, you are still playing in C, not G.

Yes, a D Dorian has the same pitch collection as the notes of the C Major scale starting on the 2nd degree.

Yes, a Minor scale with a natural 6th (not a raised 6th, because it's a b6 in minor, and moving it one half step up, makes it a natural 6th) is the pitch collection of Dorian.

No, playing those does not mean you are playing "modes".

AlanHB is correct. I know what you are trying to say, but this distinction is important, because so many people think they know modes, and they don't. Ive spent a lot of time along with others trying to clear up the ignorance in this forum, and while modes doesnt have to be controversial, it is important that they be represented in an accurate manner. When those places arise, that mean well but are misleading, then we will post about it, because we dont want scattered confusion.

Thanks for understanding. Its nothing personal against you.

Best,

Sean
#22
Quote by liampje
I was talking about modes.


no, you weren't.

blacknapkin gave you everything you need to know.
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#23
Quote by Sean0913
I know what you are trying to say, but this distinction is important, because so many people think they know modes, and they don't.


Hey do you get a lot of questions about modes at your school Sean? Because I seriously have never encountered questions about modes in real life.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#24
That's a great question

Most of them know not to even try until Ive taken them there, because we have such a supportive student base, as well the "older veterans" reassure the newer ones that "Hey listen to him, believe me, he'll get you there, its worth the wait" in a sort of big sibling sort of mentoing reassuring way. So with that kind of peer reinforcement, and the respect I have already earned as a teacher through reputation, its made it considerably easier for me to guide people in a way that will be of the most benefit for them.

Best,

Sean
#25
Quote by Sean0913
That's a great question

Most of them know not to even try until Ive taken them there, because we have such a supportive student base, as well the "older veterans" reassure the newer ones that "Hey listen to him, believe me, he'll get you there, its worth the wait" in a sort of big sibling sort of mentoing reassuring way. So with that kind of peer reinforcement, and the respect I have already earned as a teacher through reputation, its made it considerably easier for me to guide people in a way that will be of the most benefit for them.

Best,

Sean


Ahh sweet. You should have a poster on the wall saying "If I haven't told you, you don't know it (especially about modes)".
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#27
Quote by Sean0913
What would I do with the "No Stairway to Heaven Allowed...Denied" Poster?

Sean


Put it next to the "No E Phrygz in Am Srsly" poster.
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#28
Look man, don't let anyone make you think it's complicated. That is just the basic progression order. My advice is if you don't know the seven modes, go look those up, there is a great lesson here on the sight under scales. There are seven modes, the first is the Ionian, or major yes, but your fourth and fifth will be lydian and mixolydian, so in essence I'm saying no, don't just play the f major, and g major for four and five, play f lydian, and g mixolydian.
#29
Quote by slowlybilly
Look man, don't let anyone make you think it's complicated. That is just the basic progression order. My advice is if you don't know the seven modes, go look those up, there is a great lesson here on the sight under scales. There are seven modes, the first is the Ionian, or major yes, but your fourth and fifth will be lydian and mixolydian, so in essence I'm saying no, don't just play the f major, and g major for four and five, play f lydian, and g mixolydian.

But in a song that resolves to C major those don't exist, it's all just C major.
Actually called Mark!

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#30
Quote by AlanHB
Hey do you get a lot of questions about modes at your school Sean? Because I seriously have never encountered questions about modes in real life.


Same here.

The times I have mentioned modes to brass, wind and keyboard players I have gotten an odd look -- it is something they might have studied for an hour in a music theory class, but only guitar players go on and on and on about modes -- and guitar players usually have not studied music and can seldom read a note -- it make me believe that almost all talk of modes is basically BS.