#1
Hey,

I'm looking for some sort of site where I can punch in a set of notes and it returns a corresponding scale.

I found a couple via google, but none of them work.
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#2
You could try asking here.
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#3
This would be awesome. Also, if there was one that named the chord after punching in the notes.. Unless there are already ones on Google?
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#5
Is it C major?

The problem with "reverse-scale finders" is that whilst they may be "technically correct" insofar as the scale it pops out contains the notes that you put in, but in the context of a song a certain important factor is added - where the scale resolves to. This would make the difference between C major and A minor. You can't have both happening at the same time, it's either/or.

Why not take this opportunity to learn about theory yourself? That way you don't need any confusing "reverse scale finder".
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#6
what Alan said... the only thing I would add is that, this reverse scale finder maynot (and probably wouldn't) account for the use of accidentals. if a certian riff uses an accidental and doesn't use some notes, the finder may come up with a totally different scale then what the song is actually in.

for example if the song was in Cmajor and during the verse part of the riff hits an F#, realy quick at the end of it, but doesn't ever hit F, the finder may tell you it's in the key of G, where the artist may have just been implying a lydian feel before actually playing in key....

in all honesty there is no efficient way for this finder to actually work, at least not any better than your own mind would. it's really not too difficult once you learn the theory.
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#9
thanks guys.
i'm actually currently learning theory, all i've got down so far is c major/minor though. but really i've only learned to memorize the chords in the scale, (eg. for cmaj its cmaj, dmin, emin, fmaj, gmaj, amin, and bdim)... its seemed more practical for me because i usually just make riffs over chord shapes.

but yeah, the one i'm working on now is basically riffing on Em and Gminor7 (flat 7?) and Gmajor7 (flat 7?). The breaks are Amajor and the song resolves on a Gmajor(major7)
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#11
Quote by sysD
the song resolves on a Gmajor(major7)


Then the key is G major. You should employ an accidental over the a major to avoid a clash with the C#.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#12
Quote by sysD
thanks guys.
i'm actually currently learning theory, all i've got down so far is c major/minor though. but really i've only learned to memorize the chords in the scale, (eg. for cmaj its cmaj, dmin, emin, fmaj, gmaj, amin, and bdim)... its seemed more practical for me because i usually just make riffs over chord shapes.

but yeah, the one i'm working on now is basically riffing on Em and Gminor7 (flat 7?) and Gmajor7 (flat 7?). The breaks are Amajor and the song resolves on a Gmajor(major7)



First it sounds like you are making things too complicated or getting confused by a lousy theory instructor.

Look at a musical staff ... write down the triads ... Cmaj, Dmin, Emin, Fmaj, GMaj, Amin, Bdim, Cmaj and you will see .. voila -- simple!

If you start on Amin and do the same through the natural minor scale you will see all the same chords.

C major and A (natural) minor have the same notes.

The C (natural) minor scale has the same notes as the E-flat major scale.

In many situations, a song that employs C major AND C minor has some sort of key shift.

For example, "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" by George Harrison starts out in the key of A minor (no sharps no flats) over an A minor chord and the chorus ("I don't know why-y-y-y") is over an A major chord and the song moves into A major (3 sharps). This is a technique he uses often -- changing keys for some portion of a song -- in fact he wrote several songs where he goes from a minor key to a major key.

Now, get out your guitar.

Play the following:


E--------------------------------------------------
B--------------------------------------------------
G-------------------------2---------------4-------
D-------2---5--------3----------2---5-----------
A----3------------5-------------------------------
E--------------------------------------------------


E--------------------------------------------------
B-------------------------3------------5---------
G--------2--5--------4-------2---5--------------
D---3-------------5------------------------------
A--------------------------------------------------
E--------------------------------------------------


E-------------1------------------3----------------
B--------3-----------------5----------------------
G----4---------------5----------------------------
D--------------------------------------------------
A-------------------------------------------------
E--------------------------------------------------

You have Harmonized the C Major scale. A good exercise is to learn all of the note names that you are playing (say them as you play them) and learn to play them at least one other place on the fretboard (like starting with C on the 6th string, 8th fret).

What are the chord shapes that you are using?? Because riffing on Amin to G min then resolving to A and G -- sounds like a key change.

Also -- Emin7 and E minor flat 7 are the same chord -- look at the example above, when you play E G B adding a D at the third fret of the B string is third degree of the C major scale "harmonized in 4 parts". C Major 7 is a different chord that C7 (C Dominant 7). Look at G7 (G B D F) and G Major 7 (G B D F#) -- two very different chords.

There is a min(maj7) chord (for example A C E G#) which is somewhat dissonant and related to the harmonic minor scale.

I will be posting a vid to YouTube about this exact exercise (harmonizing the C Major Scale and learning the fretboard), stay posted.
#13
Quote by AlanHB
Then the key is G major. You should employ an accidental over the a major to avoid a clash with the C#.



Do you mean a sharp/flat? Because, well, the Amaj kind of works here.

Here's the sequence I'm using:

Em
Gminor7 (i wrote flat7 above because it is, and to avoid ambiguities)
Em
Gmajor7 (flat7)

Quarter Rest

Amajor for a full measure

back to the last riff

The switch from the minor to major simply turns the Bflat in the Gminor7 chord into a B...not really that big of a deal. I'm not really sure what else I should do to augment that key change.


I guess the last poster was slightly relevant. Although his post read more like an advertisement.
Thanks for the lesson on relative minor scales, and, erm, good luck to ya buddy!
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#14
Are there rules to switching to another key?
eg. g major to minor
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#15
Quote by sysD
Do you mean a sharp/flat? Because, well, the Amaj kind of works here.


Sure it can work, but A major contains a note that's not in the key of G major, can you guess what it is?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#16
Quote by sysD
Are there rules to switching to another key?
eg. g major to minor


No rules, so long as you successfully change the tonal centre then you're all good. However, it is usually easier to change to keys that have a larger number of common notes; so keys that are 1 to 2 steps away on the circle of fifths. A common way to change the key is to find a chord that both keys share and using that as a pivot chord.
#17
It sounds to me like you're a little ahead of yourself. I wouldn't just learn C Major and C Minor. I'd learn and write out the scales in all Major keys first, without looking. Once I could do that, I'd take C Minor scale and chart out the differences, with my C Major scale, and using that observation, I'd write out every minor scale in all the keys. (Use the circle of 5ths to do this)

Best,

Sean
#18
Quote by sysD
Do you mean a sharp/flat? Because, well, the Amaj kind of works here.

Here's the sequence I'm using:

Em
Gminor7 (i wrote flat7 above because it is, and to avoid ambiguities)
Em
Gmajor7 (flat7)

Quarter Rest

Amajor for a full measure

back to the last riff

The switch from the minor to major simply turns the Bflat in the Gminor7 chord into a B...not really that big of a deal. I'm not really sure what else I should do to augment that key change.


I guess the last poster was slightly relevant. Although his post read more like an advertisement.
Thanks for the lesson on relative minor scales, and, erm, good luck to ya buddy!
Well that one note does make a huge difference to be honest.

Look up parallel keys though, worth knowing.
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#19
There is one in Guitar Pro. (Not sure if I understood the question)

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#20
Quote by AlanHB
Sure it can work, but A major contains a note that's not in the key of G major, can you guess what it is?


Umm, umm, is it... C# ?
(Thanks, Wikipedia)


Quote by Sean1913

I wouldn't just learn C Major and C Minor. I'd learn and write out the scales in all Major keys first, without looking. Once I could do that, I'd take C Minor scale and chart out the differences, with my C Major scale, and using that observation, I'd write out every minor scale in all the keys. (Use the circle of 5ths to do this)



Quote by Venice King

Well that one note does make a huge difference to be honest.

Look up parallel keys though, worth knowing.



Thanks for the tips guys, I'll definately start working on the circle of fifths and parallel keys.


Oh, and just a little side question, not really relevant to the original question...
I've got this chart that I've written out on a whiteboard. It includes the 12 notes and all of their intervals (major second, minor second, minor third, major third, and so on on 'til the major tenth (16 semitones up)). Would, say, a minor scale only include the minor intervals from this chart (minor second, minor third, diminish fifth, minor sixth, ect.)?
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#22
Quote by sysD

I'm looking for some sort of site where I can punch in a set of notes and it returns a corresponding scale.

I found a couple via google, but none of them work.


What about this:

Reverse chord finder
#23
Quote by Zanon
You could just learn the theory behind scales and that would solve all this AND you would have an understanding of how it's constructed / how to build chords from said scale / be able to apply it to your playing.

Just a thought though


Exactly my sentiments. I think many of us here seek to not only help people with questions, but to inspire these same people to learn how to answer their own questions, by acquiring the same skill sets that we have.

Best,

Sean
#27
Guys this is the necro bump of the century.
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